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Independence Day Steelbook User Review

  • lucasisking
    Today we celebrate
    Review of Independence Day Steelbook blu-ray by lucasisking, Jun 7, 2016.
    A thrilling fusion of disaster movie tropes and alien invasion schlock, Independence Day is a modern B-movie masterpiece and the daddy of destruction porn. Remastered ahead of the imminent Independence Day Resurgence; ID4 comes to remind us all how a real summer blockbuster is done.

    With no pretences towards deeper meaning, moral introspection, or totting up collateral damage; Independence Day is one of those films that simply sets out to entertain; gleefully embracing its B-movie origins and revelling in its clichés; with a host of enjoyably daft characters: Jeff Goldblum on top quirky form, Will Smith just the right side of stereotype and in his Fresh-Prince prime; Randy Quaid as the well-meaning drunk; and Bill Pullman wonderfully wooden (also delivering one of cinema's most hairs-on-neck uplifting inspirational speeches) as the US Prez. It's funny, inspirational, heartwarming, and guiltlessly enjoyable from patriotic start to cheesetastic finish.

    What you might have forgotten however, (especially in these anything-is-possible cinematic times) is how downright exhilarating the film is. Swarms of alien craft; destroyers as big as cities; a mothership the size of a continent; vast aerial dogfights; nuclear strikes; cities pulverised and landmarks obliterated: it's awesome on a scale beyond anything this side of a galaxy far, far away. Emmerich really knew how to put everything up on screen, and he lets the camera linger on each and every gobsmacking frame (no fast-edits or shaky cam here). The first half of the movie is a masterclass in the art of build-up; first as the aliens arrive in all their screen-filling immensity; and later in the panic-inducing countdown to you-know-what. The eventual payback, and our heroes refusal to 'go quietly into the night', is as fist-pumpingly brilliant as it is dazzlingly implausible and silly. This is a huge, no-expense-spared behemoth of a movie that pushes it’s genre to its limit; if you don’t enjoy it you are missing several pleasure centres of your brain.

    The bluray presentation is also a crowd-pleaser. I missed this on its initial bluray release, and I'm glad I waited for this special ed. It's not uniformly perfect, but for the most part it looks like a blockbuster film that came out a year ago. Faces and close-ups are especially impressive. Some of the SFX are also starting-inevitably- to look rough round the edges, but the imagery is mostly so stunning it doesn't matter. I enjoyed the sound too although didn't have the opportunity to let loose with it; its a fully immersive sound-field. A disc fully of extras (which I haven't tackled yet) adds further value to an already essential purchase.
    This item was purchased for 7.00 from Amazon UK in 2016. The reviewer still owns this product.

    Pros

    • A thrilling, crowd-pleasing B-movie extravaganza
    • Excellent remaster yields stunning image quality for the most part
    • Immersive sound
    • Added value

    Cons

    • Might be too corny and silly for some
    • Some of the special effects havent aged well
    • Some scenes betray the film's age

    Movie

    9

    Picture Quality

    9

    Sound Quality

    9

    Extras

    8

    Overall

    9
    1. bruce-leroy and Hixs like this.
    No comments have been posted on this review yet.
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