Zyxel 310 and the outside world - HELP!

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by tontoshorse, Aug 18, 2013.

  1. tontoshorse

    tontoshorse
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    So after mistakenly believing it would be "a good idea" to dip into the world of networking and after buying a Zyxel 310, plugging it into my BT home hub 2, I am now struggling to unleash this mysterious black box into the cyberspace world.

    For anyone familiar with the 310 NAS discovery screen, the NAS has been given a IP address and is visible to my PC although there is a red line from the NAS to the network. This suggests it isn't then visible to anywhere else.

    Having said that my Axis Xs, which is also on my network can play music which I have transferred over to the NAS. This is by good luck rather than anything else.

    I keep seeing "Port forwarding" as the solution but that is where my luck runs out. I have no grasp of this concept whatsoever!

    Clearly my IT skills may be slightly above writing in chalk on cave walls but no where good enough to advance from simply plugging things in and watching what happens.

    So can anyone assist in getting this sorted and getting my evenings back?

    Many thanks!
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2013
  2. cjed

    cjed
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    What exactly are you trying to acheive ? By that, I mean what task do you want the NAS to perform that requires a connection from outside your home network ?
     
  3. tontoshorse

    tontoshorse
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    I'm very much in the "I wonder how this works" stage at the moment. Looking ahead though I'd like to be able to download files remotely or at least allow guests/users to have access remotely. I've set up a no-ip domain name, although I already have a domain name pointing to Red Bubble. However I can't figure out how to port forward - the router doesn't even see the Nas as connected, so the drop down box on the Bt home hub doesn't include the Nas.

    You may gather that this isn't one of my strengths!
     
  4. cjed

    cjed
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    OK, the first thing to do is to get the Router to be aware of your NAS. The easiest way to do this is to set your NAS as a DHCP client (usually called automatic setting of IP address), so it's assigned an internal (local network) IP address by the Router. Then go onto the router and there should be a section that allows you to "fix" a devices IP address so it always gets given the same one.

    Now your Router should allow you to forward ports from the internet directly to the NAS. You need to find which ports are required for specific connection protocols (such as FTP for file transfers, port 80 for HTTP requests and o on)and allow these to be forwarded to your NAS. You will probably also need to use a service like dynDNS to resolve a domain name to the IP address assigned to your router by your ISP so you can access it from the Internet.

    There's an awful lot of technical knowledge required for this, a lot can be found by googling the specific task you want to accomplish, but it's not unusual for some trial and error to be involved.

    Finally, be aware that opening your internal network up to the internet like this introduces the very real possibility of hostile connections to your internal machines from the world at large. Make sure that you only forward the ports you really need, and that any service exposed like this has strong authentification in place to reduce this risk.
     
  5. tontoshorse

    tontoshorse
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    Hmmmmm, this is where the initial problem lies. The NAS has been allocated a dynamic IP address, and a dynamic DNS, however the BT router doesn't see it even though its connected via a cable directly. All other devices show up.
    It's strange as I have mentioned, the NAS is up and running over the network and I've successfully uploaded music files from a PC and can listen to them from a wirelessly connected device.
     
  6. mickevh

    mickevh
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    Routers don't need to be "aware" of what devices are connected to them to work - it's very much a bonus feature and only really there for reporting purposes. In normal operations, routers process traffic on a packet by packet basis based on the source and destination IP addresses of each packet.

    It's like letters in the post: The posties in the sorting offices don't need to be "aware" of any geography or presence (like whether you are "in" or not.) All they need to do is read the addresses on each package and ensure the package egresses each sorting office through the appropriate door to get the package towards its destination.

    Port forwarding rules are easiest to set up using IP addresses. To ensure the IP address of the target device in your LAN is always the same, you need to configure your DHCP server so that it always gives the same (internal) IP address to you NAS as advised.

    Dynamic DHCP and Dynamic DNS (DynDNS) are separate and largely unrelated processes - be sure not to confuse the two.

    Equally your router will include a both DHCP Server which issues IP addresses to the device inside your LAN and a DHCP Client which it uses to obtain a valid public Internet IP address from your ISP to use for it's external (WAN) inteface. Again, DHCP Server and DHCP Client functionality on your router are separate and unrelated.

    Because the external (WAN) interface of you router can change public IP address at any time, you need a way to be able to "find" your router from the public Internet. This is what DynDNS is about: It's a mechanism whereby you can register a name in the public Internet name space which is always yours, thence a process runs between your router & DynDNS provider to ensure your name always point to your router. (Note that not all routers support this, but if your does, it would be preferably to run the DynDNS agent in your router rather than a LAN side devices - it's a bit "cleaner" that way.)
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013

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