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Zoom Aspect Ratio

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Nobber, Jun 7, 2002.

  1. Nobber

    Nobber
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    Sony VPLVW11HT

    If I watch movies (16:9) using the Zoom aspect ratio am i loosing any picture quality?
    thanks
     
  2. LV426

    LV426
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    First, lets suppose that you have your DVD player set such as your (TV) is a widescreen (16x9) TV. This means that it will output an anamorphic signal where the DVD disc has such a signal on it.

    If the above is true, then:

    If the DVD has an anamorphic signal on it, you should use the "Full" setting.

    If the DVD does not have an anamorphic signal on it, but the film is widescreen (ie is letterboxed) you should use the zoom setting. What this does is enlarge the 4x3 video signal both vertically and horizontally so that it occupies the full width of the screen, but the picture is too large in the vertical direction so the top and bottom of the picture get cropped off. However, because this part of the picture contains the black padding, you don't loose anything important.

    If you watch an anamorphic DVD in zoom mode, you will not loose any definition. But you will get a picture that is incorrectly shaped. Objects in the picture will be vertically stretched.

    If you have your DVD player set as if the (TV) was a 4x3 TV, then all widescreen films will be output in non-anamorphic mode irrespective of the disc format, and you will need to use zoom mode for all widescreen films. However, in this case, you WILL lose definition.
     

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