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Zone 2/3 explained + examples

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by sapkan, Oct 11, 2004.

  1. sapkan

    sapkan
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    I am having my flat rebuilt and want to integrate an AV system seamlessly. I noticed that most modern receivers have a Zone 2/3 option. I want to make sure I am getting this correct as I consider putting some in-ceiling speakers around the place (terrace, kitchen):

    Zone 2: If your receiver is 7.1 and you are only using 5.1 you can have 2 speakers somewhere else in the house and play something on them from completely different source even when watching 5.1 material in the main room. I am planning a 6.1 set-up so in my case only one powered channel is left = not good enough

    Zone 3: Here I am bit more confused: You can hook up a second amp (I have an older Pioneer stereo item) even if your system is set-up for 7.1 and drive speakers in a different room. Whats the real benefit here? Why not have a separate system altogether? How do you control volume? Presumably you have to go and turn on the other amp separately.

    Please give me suggestions and let me know if I am missing something out or have misunderstood the terminology
     
  2. sapkan

    sapkan
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    elp, elp, elp pls
     
  3. BrianC

    BrianC
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    I can only really comment on the yamaha 1400 but that allows you to either use the B speaker pair (assuming you do not bi-amp your front speakers as I have done) as zone 2 or the presence speaker terminals (which are powered, just not as powerful as the main 7 speakers) as zone 3. So with the yamaha you do not need a seperate amp for zone 3.

    The main point of a seperatley powered zone 3 would be the use of a single batch of sources (cd, tuner, etc.) all stored in a single location, rather than having to purchase multiple cd players and so on. A stereo amp would be much cheaper than a stereo amp and a new cd player etc for the zone 3.
     
  4. booktrunk

    booktrunk
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    Hi,

    With regard to the third Zone, the benefit is that you do not need a second inpout device. So you don't have to have a seperate CD Player with your seperate amp, and you can presumably play the same thing in all the zones at once.

    So there is a limited benefit from the third Zone but if you do want to have the same thing playing everywhere or you don't want to have a extra source with your other amp then thats what the advantage is.

    I hope that makes some sense.

    Cheers

    Steff
     
  5. sapkan

    sapkan
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    Ok, makes sense now.

    Brian are you saying that with the Yamaha I can have a 7.1 configured in the main room and still power even more speakers in a different room through the so-called Presence speakers?
     
  6. BrianC

    BrianC
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    thats correct, you can actually power a 2 speaker mirror of the main 7.1 output via the speaker b terminals and have a seperately selectable sourcing driving an additional zone via the Presence speakers and the record dial on the front of the amp.
     
  7. sapkan

    sapkan
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    but you cant have A and B running at the same time, right (its either A or B)?

    assume I'm watching 6.1 in the main room but want to pop over to the kitchen and still listen to whats goin on in the movie I would connect the extra in-ceiling speakers to the presence outputs.
     
  8. BrianC

    BrianC
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    No, you can have A and B speakers running at the same time (other wise Bi-amping like I'm doing wouldn't work for a start), its just that the B speakers HAVE to output the same as the A speakers, while you get a choice of source (via the record dial on the amp) with the presence outputs.
     
  9. John Dawson

    John Dawson
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    You can do something like what you want with the Arcam AVR300 and 250, whereby you can run 5.1 in one room and a separate 2 channel set of speakers (with composite video support) in another, using the remaining channels 6 and 7 of amplification. Alternatively you can run a 7.1 system in the main room and send zone 2 at line level to a separate integrated or power amplifier (both are supported). Volume control can be via IR and a Xantech Dinky Link or similar through jack points on the back panel.

    You will need to provide an analogue 2 channel feed to the AVR for anything you want to send to the second zone as there is only one set of DSPs in the receiver. Most Arcam source components (CD, DVD, tuners) provide 2 pairs of analogue outputs to help enable this very easily. The same applies to video - you will need a composite video feed from your source components to the AVR if you wish to support video in zone 2.

    We don't support a zone 3 as such though you could use a tape send signal to duplicate zone 1's output and feed this to a suitable integrated amp. This works well except when playing zone 1 in multichannel or from a digital input.

    There's an AVR250/300 handbook at www.arcam.co.uk/handbooks.cfm

    HTH.

    John Dawson (Arcam)
     

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