Yamaha RX-V761 - Getting hot

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by isdfe5, Jan 1, 2012.

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  1. isdfe5

    isdfe5
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    Hi All and Happy New Year

    I have just got a Yamaha RX-V761 amp to replace my Onkyo TX-SR606 that has the faulty caps problem... :(

    Anyway I love the Yamaha amp - far nicer than the old 606 IMO. The only issue I currently have is that when I play music at quite loud volumes (-13db ish) for a while, say 45 minutes or so, the amp gets pretty warm/hot on top. Not so hot that you cannot touch it (!) or it cuts out (I assume there is a thermal cutout built-in to these amps?), but it is hot enough to be a cause for concern.

    Should I implement some sort of additional cooling (unfortunately there is only around 3.5cm clearance above the amp) using PC cooling fans? And would it need to exhaust the hot air out of the back of the hi-fi stand? I did look at laptop coolers and also bespoke amp cooling solutions (mostly of these are made in America and expensive....). Any suggestions welcomed.

    The other option that might work is to lower the speaker impedance setting on the amp I guess? The speakers are rated 4-8 ohms (MS Alumni) and are supposed to be okay on an 8 ohm setting. I do also remeber reading that reducing the speaker impedance from the default, i.e. 8 ohms, does have an adverse effect on the sound as it just cuts the voltage somewhere in the amplifier circuitry, and this degrades the bass response, fidelity, etc. Even if I do this it may not reduce the heat sufficiently?

    Any advice gratefully received.

    Many Thanks
    Chris
     
  2. Badger0-0

    Badger0-0
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    35mm isn't enough clearance and I'd definitely look at a couple of fans sucking out the back.
     
  3. dante01

    dante01
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    Using the impedance switching on the amp will reduce the overheating, but at the expense of audio dynamics and fidelity. You are right in saying that such switching simply reduces rail voltage and this in turn makes your amp less proficient with audio.

    I can only suggest you not play audio as loud as you do. THis level of audio would have the environmental health officer paying you a visit and is probably damaging your hearing too???!!!

    If you really want and must have such high levels, you're ultimately going to have to look at the purchase of a more capable amp and/or sensitive speakers.

    As already noted, the lack of ventilation isn't helping matters.
     

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