Question Yamaha RX-V685 odd problem with speaker distances when calibrating with YPAO

CraftyClown

Active Member
Hi all,

So I've just upgraded from the Yamaha RX-V381 to the RX-V685 and I'm having a strange problem when calibrating my 5.1.2 setup via YPAO.

Most of my speaker distances are measured correctly, apart from my surround speakers and my front presence speakers, whose distances are wildly off.

My two fronts are roughly 9 feet away
My centre is about 7 feet away
My sub is 10 feet away

all of which are pretty accurate

My left surround is about 9 feet away, but it measures as 25 feet
My right surround is about 6 feet away, but it measures as 23 feet
My right atmos is about 9 feet away, but it measures as 13 feet
My left atmos is about 9 feet away, but it measures as 24 feet

I guess my first question is, does it matter if the distance readings are wrong? The level results all seem to make sense, relative to the speakers actual distances away, but I just want to make sure this doesn't factor into anything else, like the parametric eq for example.

My presumption is that reason the atmos speakers are wrongly reported is because they are not direct and are bouncing off the ceiling and the reason for the surrounds being incorrect is that they are bipoles and may also be bouncing sound around causing issues with distance measurement.

Does that sound about right?
 

dante01

Distinguished Member
The distance the AV receiver arrives at is calculated by measuring how long the test tone took to reach the calibration mic. AV receivers are pretty good at this and the fact that the distance they arrive at being different to what you mat get using a tape measure is by no means an indication that the receiver is incorrect. Other factors may be influencing how long a signal takes to reach you listening lcation and it is the time taken that is of importance as opposed to the physical distance.

You should try ensure the mic is mounted on a stable surface or preferably on a dedicated stand where possible. Not doing so can sometimes result in inaccurate distance measurements.

Other than the above, do not worry too much about the results not being the same as physical distances you may have measured with a tape. A tape measure cannot measure audio delay or the time audio takes to arrive at the mic and this is what the receiver is in fact measuring in order to syncronise the associated speakers.

If using upward firing Atmos speakers then I'd not expect you to be getting results that appromiate physical distances. AS suggested, the distance setting will be indicative of how long the su=ihnal took to reach the mic. THe settings are correct as long as the measurements are actually indicative of how long that audio took to reach the mic.
 
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CraftyClown

Active Member
The distance the AV receiver arrives at is calculated by measuring how long the test tone took to rach the calibration mic. AV receivers are pretty good at this and the fact that the distance they arrive at being different to what you mat get using a tape measure is by no means an indication that the receiver is incorrect. Other factors may be influencing how long a signal takes to reach you listening lcation and it is the time taken that is of importance as opposed to the physical distance.

You should try ensure the mic is mounted on a stable surface or preferably on a dedicated stand where possible. Not doing so can sometimes result in inaccurate distance measurements.

Other than the above, do not worry too much about the results not be the same as physical distances you may have measured with a tape. A tape measure cannot measure audio delay or the time audio rakes o arrive at the mic and this is what the receiver is in gact measuring in order to syncronise the associated speakers.

If using upward firing Atmos speakers then I'd not expect you to b getting results that appromiate physical distances. AS suggested, the distance setting will be indicative of how long the su=ihnal took to reach the mic. THe settings are correct as long as the measurements are actually indicative of how long that audio took to reach the mic.
Thank you dante01. Greatly appreciated
 

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