Yamaha R-N602 connecting to old iMac as a server?

oldschooly

Standard Member
I have a Yamaha R-N602 and thoroughly enjoying all of its various connectivity options. I store all my music (mp3/FLAC) on my old Apple iMac (2009) macOS Sierra 10.12.6 is the latest OS it uses.

Rather than purchase an actual NAS, is it possible to use File Sharing option on my old iMac to stream music to the R-N602?

I tried myself by selecting File Sharing on in the iMac system preferences, and then selecting a music folder as a shared folder. When i selected Server on the Yamaha I wasn't sure what to do next.

Is what I'm doing possible? if so, what is the best way around it?

BTW I assume streaming music this way will prove to be better quality than using Airplay from the iMac?

Thanks
 

jamieu

Well-known Member
BTW I assume streaming music this way will prove to be better quality than using Airplay from the iMac?

That very much depends on what your trying to achieve and how you want to manage and control playback of your music files.

If you're currently using iTunes/Apple Music on your iMac to mange and playback your music there will be very little benefit to using anything above AirPlay. It works well on Apple devices and supports CD resolution (44.1Khz/16bit).

What do you find cumbersome or limiting about your current setup? That might give a better insight into what alternatives could be suggested to get round those niggles.

Rather than purchase an actual NAS, is it possible to use File Sharing option on my old iMac to stream music to the R-N602?

Yes it is totally possible to use your iMac instead of a NAS. There is nothing inherently special about a NAS with regards to what it can do.

But your Yamaha can't see a standard shared network volume. This would also be true with a NAS.

Instead you have to install a DLNA server on your iMac to index your music files and make them available to the Denon. Universal Media Server and MinimServer are two of the most popular.

You'll then need to use a DLNA control app like BubbleUPnP or mConnect or maybe even the app that comes with your Yamaha to control playback.

You can also install Plex and configure it to act as a DLNA server. Although before you get too excited you can't use the nice Plex apps/interface to stream to a DLNA renderer like your Yamaha. It simply exposes the backend Plex library to 3rd party DLNA control apps and DLNA renderers. The native Plex interface/apps can only stream (directly) to a device running the Plex client or (last time I looked) to a Chromecast Audio (CCA).

If you're looking for a direct iTunes/Apple Music replacement then Audirvana may be an option. As it can handle FLAC files, stream directly to a DLNA renderer (like your Yamaha) and also allows you to control it via a mobile app (iOS/Android). It also integrates support for Qobuz and Tidal.

Context: One of the main reasons people use DLNA servers (or any other client/server based streaming solution) is that they don't want to keep their computer on 24/7 to play music. By running a DLNA server (or similar media server) on a NAS (which are normally left on 24/7) you effectively remove the iMac from the picture. But the problem then becomes how to control playback of your music given the NAS most likely won't have a monitor attached. The solution is to separate your music system/architecture into three components: 1) the server (indexing of music, running on the NAS), 2) the controller (select music/play it, running on a Mac/PC/Mobile) and 3) the renderer (get the stream from the server and play it, ie. your Yamaha). That allows you to control playback from multiple control apps (ie. mobile/desktop) and to stream to multiple renderers (if you have multiple audio playback devices). But if you're just playing music back from your iMac to one audio device that's probably overkill — just stick with AirPlay.
 
Last edited:

Cebolla

Member
Your Yamaha R-N602 does not support ordinary computer network file sharing and instead uses industry standard UPnP/DLNA media file streaming in order to play the music files over the network.

So if AirPlay isn't for some reason working for you, as @jamieu says, you need to install UPnP/DLNA media server software on your MAC (Windows computers & most NASs come with one pre-installed) to enable its stored music files to be streamed over the network to the Yamaha.
 

oldschooly

Standard Member
@Cebolla @jamieu

Thank you for the replies.

Apple Airplay is working fine from my iMac to the Yamaha. Combined with using MusicCast app and Apple iTunes Remote from my iPhone, I am able to control and listen to music from the iMac quite comfortably. It also sounds better than Bluetooth.

However, my original post was because I wondered if streaming music from my iMac as a server would improve the already good sound made by Airplay.

Also I have plenty of FLAC files on my iMac so i envisaged placing them all into a nice foldered system so i can access using the MusicCast app. iTunes does not support FLAC.

From what I have read from you both it seems like Airplay is sufficient enough to maximise the best possible sound through wireless from my collection. My FLAC files i'll place on a USB and source directly on the Yamaha.
 

jamieu

Well-known Member
@Cebolla @jamieu
Also I have plenty of FLAC files on my iMac so i envisaged placing them all into a nice foldered system so i can access using the MusicCast app. iTunes does not support FLAC.

From what I have read from you both it seems like Airplay is sufficient enough to maximise the best possible sound through wireless from my collection. My FLAC files i'll place on a USB and source directly on the Yamaha.

As you point out the FLAC files are an issue with iTunes that's a reason a lot of users migrated away from using it. It also doesn't integrate well with any streaming services other than Apple Music.

No need to put your music into folders if you're using a UPnP/DLNA server or an application like Audirvana as it will look at the metadata contained in each file and create suitable year, genre, artists lists/views for you automatically. Some of the more advanced music servers can even look at the Acoustic fingerprint of each file and then use online metadata catalogues to pull in extra metadata and artwork.

If you don't mind paying then Audirvana is a halfway house as it can index your FLAC (and Apple ALAC) files, has both desktop and mobile apps with well built interfaces (you can also switch between them while music is playing) and can stream to your Yamaha (via UPnP/DLNA).

But Universal Media Server (UPnP/DLNA) is free so you could always give it a go and see how it indexes your music collection and displays it up to the MusicCast app. Just point it at the root of your music library (under 'Shared Content'). If you like using the MusicCast app, this (or a similar UPnP/DLNA server installed on the iMac) would be the simplest way to handle your FLAC files.

In term of sound quality if all you're playing is CD rips then the 44.1Khz/16bit provided by AirPlay is all you need. No point or need in going higher as the original CDs will only have been encoded to that rate.
 
Last edited:

oldschooly

Standard Member
But Universal Media Server (UPnP/DLNA) is free so you could always give it a go and see how it indexes your music collection and displays it up to the MusicCast app. Just point it at the root of your music library (under 'Shared Content'). If you like using the MusicCast app, this (or a similar UPnP/DLNA server installed on the iMac) would be the simplest way to handle your FLAC files.

I will continue with Airplay, but I also downloaded the Universal Media Server. It's a very straight forward software. What I like about it is it gives you a choice to navigate music through its own indexing or iTunes own. It's a little slow compared to using other sources on the MusicCast app.

I'll use a designated folder exclusively for FLAC on the iMac and use USM for that purpose only. And Airplay for standard mp3's.

Thanks for the solution
 

oldschooly

Standard Member
As you point out the FLAC files are an issue with iTunes that's a reason a lot of users migrated away from using it. It also doesn't integrate well with any streaming services other than Apple Music.

No need to put your music into folders if you're using a UPnP/DLNA server or an application like Audirvana as it will look at the metadata contained in each file and create suitable year, genre, artists lists/views for you automatically. Some of the more advanced music servers can even look at the Acoustic fingerprint of each file and then use online metadata catalogues to pull in extra metadata and artwork.

If you don't mind paying then Audirvana is a halfway house as it can index your FLAC (and Apple ALAC) files, has both desktop and mobile apps with well built interfaces (you can also switch between them while music is playing) and can stream to your Yamaha (via UPnP/DLNA).

But Universal Media Server (UPnP/DLNA) is free so you could always give it a go and see how it indexes your music collection and displays it up to the MusicCast app. Just point it at the root of your music library (under 'Shared Content'). If you like using the MusicCast app, this (or a similar UPnP/DLNA server installed on the iMac) would be the simplest way to handle your FLAC files.

In term of sound quality if all you're playing is CD rips then the 44.1Khz/16bit provided by AirPlay is all you need. No point or need in going higher as the original CDs will only have been encoded to that rate.
Just a little update as it's been a week of using both Airplay vs UMS.

The user experience of using Airplay/Yamaha MusicCast app accompanied with Apple iTunes Remote, is practically flawless with the added bonus of being allowed to scan back and forth on any song. The sound quality is very good.

The user experience of Universal Media Server with Yamaha MusicCast app is quite somewhat limited and slow to browse through its indexing system. No ability to scan through a specific song.

However the sound quality of streaming standard mp3 files from the UMS to the Yamaha is clearly better and punchier than Airplay. I've done direct comparisons on many songs and streaming via UMS always comes on top. I even compared USB vs streaming from the UMS and I couldn't tell any difference... Streaming may have pipped USB.

So I'm going to continue using both and try and find a 3rd party app that will support streaming from UMS to the Yamaha with a better indexing and browsing UI. I'll also look into Audirvana as per your post.

Thanks
 
Last edited:

Jamie

Distinguished Member
You could use Logitech Media Server with the DLNA bridge plugin. This will use your DLNA capable Yamaha as an emulated squeezebox.

You can then either use one of several LMS control apps, ipeng is probably the best for iOS but TBH if you also install the material skin plugin for LMS the browser interface is pretty good.
 
Last edited:

oldschooly

Standard Member
So I've tried UMS, Plex and LMS for the past 2-3 weeks.

LMS seems to the most reliable and works well with MusicCast app or mConnect. Although MusicCast app doesn't allow search or track scanning/scrubbing.

Seems that scanning/scrubbing through songs using any app via the server is not possible.
 

Jamie

Distinguished Member
Using it this way LMS is simply acting like a DLNA server, it's a valid way of using it but you're not making the best of LMS like this as you're still reliant on musiccast for functionality.

If you're using LMS try setting up the "UPnP/DLNA bridge" plugin. Once setup your amp should appear as a squeezebox player in the LMS interface.

I'd also suggest enabling the material skin which makes the web interface much better and usable on a mobile browser.

Once LMS is setup this way I believe you'll be able to scrub tracks as desired, if you're lucky you may even get gapless playback, there's a direct stream option you can tick in the bridge plugin configuration which will allow gapless but may then stop your amp showing track information.
 

oldschooly

Standard Member
Using it this way LMS is simply acting like a DLNA server, it's a valid way of using it but you're not making the best of LMS like this as you're still reliant on musiccast for functionality.

If you're using LMS try setting up the "UPnP/DLNA bridge" plugin. Once setup your amp should appear as a squeezebox player in the LMS interface.

I'd also suggest enabling the material skin which makes the web interface much better and usable on a mobile browser.

Once LMS is setup this way I believe you'll be able to scrub tracks as desired, if you're lucky you may even get gapless playback, there's a direct stream option you can tick in the bridge plugin configuration which will allow gapless but may then stop your amp showing track information.

I'm confused to how you get the LMS interface on my iphone? I opened the mysqueezebox.com url on my iphone but could not see a way to view the actual amp.
 

Jamie

Distinguished Member
My squeezebox server has a fixed up address on my network of 192.168.1.220 and the webinterface is available on port 9000 so I use the following address in my browser

192.168.1.220:9000
 

The latest video from AVForums

AVForums Movies Podcast: Which is the best decade for horror movies?
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom