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yamaha 430 rds

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by ewin, Aug 20, 2003.

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  1. ewin

    ewin
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    Does anyone have any reviews about this amp as it`s selling for £179 at r.s and want to know something about it as like the sound,power,set up,dsp,matrix 6.1 ,etc.
    Please don`t ask me to save up and get the 440 as i`n tie to their cashback deal.
    thanks
     
  2. blackcat

    blackcat
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    http://www.whatvideotv.com/testbench/frame.html?http://www.whatvideotv.com/cgi-bin/reviews.php?reviewid=2455

    Having been slimmed down to hit a £290 price point, is Yamaha's RX-V430RDS an AV lightweight? Is it hell, says David Smith
    It's possible to get a little carried away with the latest sound formats, upgradeability and endless connection options. For many home cinema enthusiasts these things are the very breath of life, but for others a more modest product is just the ticket.

    Yamaha's RX-V430RDS is a budget receiver which casts aside some of the trappings of home cinema to get its price below £300. So what are you expected to do without? For a start, amplification is limited to five channels, each of which gets 65W.

    There are no preamp outputs, so upgrading with a power amp is out of the question. The lack of a sixth channel of amplification rules out Dolby Digital EX and DTS ES sound formats (although there is a virtual 6.1 format available).

    Next, there's no S-video support. For those who like to route video through their receiver (using it as a central switching box) this is a blow. But if you're happy to hook video sources directly to your TV it's irrelevant.

    Finally, there are no front-panel inputs. These make it convenient to hook up a games console or camcorder, for instance, but their absence isn't a disaster.

    So much for what Yamaha is asking you to do without. What is left on the menu? Dolby Digital, DTS and Dolby Pro-Logic II decoding, a raft of 21 DSP sound modes (with 41 total variations), an RDS tuner and Silent Cinema for headphone listening. Rounding off the useful features are 6.1 Matrix settings for a phantom centre-rear channel in 6.1 or 5.1 sound modes.

    Connections stretch to two digital inputs (one optical, one electrical) and a decent selection of stereo analogue inputs. Six-channel inputs make it possible to connect up an external decoder or an SACD/DVD-Audio player.

    Setting the V430RDS up is straightforward, and you can select from a standard set of speaker adjustments. A test tone helps you adjust the settings to your taste.

    Bass and treble dials are sited on the front panel, so you don't have to delve into a menu to make these most basic of sound adjustments.

    For those who fancy a little extra from their audio, Yamaha's usual generous selection of DSP modes includes Concert Hall, Jazz Club, Rock Concert, Entertainment, Movie Theatre 1 and 2, Mono Movie, TV Sports and Enhanced, with variations available on many.

    PERFORMANCE
    Thankfully, no corners have been cut in the most crucial area - performance. Hooked up to Primare's V10 DVD deck and fed our standard selection of test DVDs, the V430RDS's soundstage bursts into life.

    This receiver's sound is warm and rich, which may not appeal to those who like a more urgent, raw quality but is sure to please more people than it disappoints. On crash-bang movie soundtracks the action flies from the speakers with real power, making Yamaha's 65W-per-channel power rating seem rather modest.

    Bass is particularly fulsome, but never strays into the realms of muddiness, nor does it swamp the higher frequencies. In quieter moments the dialogue has a wonderfully resonant tone and background music is smooth.

    Music sources benefit from the warm tone, making them extremely easy to listen to. Complex passages, for instance in classical music, are still portrayed with admirable delicacy and accuracy.

    To sum up, in the RX-V430RDS Yamaha has served up a brilliant receiver for anyone with simple tastes. Its performance is way better than you have any right to expect at this price point. The truncated feature and connections count may put some potential buyers off, but those who aren't troubled by the omissions will be amply rewarded.


    Hope that helps:smashin:
     

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