Y splitter for use with subwoofer interconnect query

rufio84

Novice Member
Hi peeps

First post here.

I have a query about splitters and sound quality for a 2.1 set up.

I've resisted a subwoofer for a good five years, but took the plunge on purchasing a second hand PV1 this evening.

My audio set up is: Marantz PM8005 stereo amp, Marantz SA8005 CD player, B & W CM9 S2 floor standers and now the B & W PV1. I'm using a "speaker A" cable set up, i.e. not bi-wired but may consider doing so in future.

As an aside, I'm slowly planning a surround sound set up as I only recently discovered that an optical connection from TV to amp means that the bandwidth is no where near the audio detail for films that I aspire to hear one day. Most likely that will be a separate post in future as I have many questions with seemingly conflicting answers!

In anticipation for the PV1's expected arrival on Monday I hastily purchased a subwoofer interconnect, namely a QED Performance subwoofer interconnect, which consists of one cable.

In hindsight, with weeks of also researching future AV receivers and staring at the images of the back panels it made me misremember that there was a single "subwoofer out" on my Marantz PM8005. I checked the back this evening and discovered that there are in fact two L and R pre outs, and not one subwoofer out as I had originally thought.

My question is: if I use a Y splitter to plug the interconnect from the sub into both L and R pre outs on the amp will this adversely affect sound quality? That is, if I spent money on a relatively expensive cable vs, say, an Amazon Basic cable, would using the relatively cheap Y splitter mean that I have wasted money on the interconnect, if it ultimately means annexing a cheaper product onto a more expensive one? Will plugging the interconnect into the splitter mean not getting the full whack out of the interconnect? That said, I couldn't find a subwoofer interconnect that splits from one single connection (line input) into two L and R pre out inputs.

Can someone please advise?

Thanks
 
Solution
You could use the 'B' speaker binding posts to make life simpler and either add a set of banana plugs to the B&W cable or as you say poke the bare wire through the hole ands screw down the binding posts.

Joe

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
With no dedicated Sub out on the Stereo amp you will want to run both the LR Pre Outs to the Sub via separate RCA to RCA cables and then use the Sub Crossover and level settings to blend the Sub with your Room/Front LR Speakers.

The 2 x RCA to RCA cables required for the Sub should not be overly expensive.

Joe
 
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rufio84

Novice Member
With no dedicated Sub out on the Stereo amp you will want to run both the LR Pre Outs to the Sub via separate RCA to RCA cables and then use the Sub Crossover and level settings to blend the Sub with your Room/Front LR Speakers.

The 2 x RCA to RCA cables required for the Sub should not be overly expensive.

Joe
Many thanks Joe. I have since found the manual online, which suggests a high level connection for a 2 channel set up, so have cancelled the interconnect purchase.

From researching this, apparently the sub's crossover settings only works with the high level connection.

You mentioned using the cross over and level to blend. I appreciate that there is no substitute for listening, but from what I understand, I THINK a sub is supposed to be set at 70% of the main speaker's frequency response (or is it frequency range?). The speaker's frequency response is 46 Hz to 28 kHz. For the purposes of crossover, do I therefore use the 46 Hz figure, and not the higher 28 kHz figure? I.e. 70% of 46 Hz = circa 32. Therefore the lowest setting on the low pass frequency control is 40 Hz... so presumably, in theory, this is the most appropriate crossover setting?

Apologies, this is all new to me.
 
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Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
PV1 - yes quite a unique set up, you will want one of the B&W supplied cables or a DIY equivalent.

Sub - you set the cross over to blend the Sub with the low frequency capabilities of the Front LR and try and avoid the Sub and Front LR 'doubling up' where you create the blend, the room/sub positioning will also affect what you hear so use your ears if you don't have any form of metering/callibration kit.

Joe
 
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rufio84

Novice Member
Thanks again Joe. Final question on this I promise.

I am a bit concerned if wiring the sub incorrectly may ruin the amp. The PV1 manual says to wire the red, green, yellow and black RJ11 connection wires to the speaker terminals but is silent as to where exactly wire them in. As you can see below, the speakers are plugged in to the amp via banana plugs. Do I attach the red, green, yellow and black wires through the holes in the connections?

I.e. feed and tighten the RJ11 wires where that hole is to the diagonal right circa 2 o'clock position is? So I keep the banana plugs in where they are but the RJ11 four wires to into these holes? As in I don't need to take apart the banana plugs and wire the RJ11 wires to each of the appropriate speaker cables?

Don't want to blow something up!
PXL_20210131_151425634.jpg
 
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Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
You could use the 'B' speaker binding posts to make life simpler and either add a set of banana plugs to the B&W cable or as you say poke the bare wire through the hole ands screw down the binding posts.

Joe
 
Upvote 0
Solution

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