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XGA non-480P, or SVGA with 480P?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Goof, Jan 21, 2003.

  1. Goof

    Goof
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    I got my first Pj a couple of months ago and was delighted with it - though humble, I got a great image on a 8ft screen from 14ft!

    I'm connecting via HCPC so get Prog Scan, but now that I know a little bit more, I've realised my Pj is a data projector and tho it is XGA it doesn't have 480P.

    I've got a bit of upgraditis so am thinking about taking the plunge for 480P, however, on my budget there's more SVGA models with the specs I like rather than well spec'd XGA's.

    So, basically the question is: stick with XGA non-480P, or SVGA with 480P?
    Or if I do come across a well spec'd XGA at the right price, will the 480P make a big difference?

    TIA :)
     
  2. olaiho

    olaiho
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    Goof,
    it looks like you are a bit unsure about what 480p is.

    480p is what you call a progressive NTSC component video signal. NTSC has a resolution of 720 x 480. PAL progressive component is known as 576p, and has a resolution of 768x576.

    Your projector, while being a data model, is able to display both NTSC and PAL as progressive, when you use it with your PC. You ARE getting 480p, and even better because 1024x768 is enough to display the full PAL resolution, unlike most of the inexpensive HT projectors at the moment!

    VGA connection is also way better than a 480p component connection, because it is able to bypass the internal scaler electronics of the projector. Thus, when you have your PC properly set up (see my advice in the "other" thread), you have the best option: a direct feed into the projector.

    So, tweak that PC and enjoy your NTSC and PAL progressive picture!

    Best Regards,
    Olaiho

    p.s. If you wanna delve deeper into progressive scan, read this: Progressive Scan
     
  3. Goof

    Goof
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    Thanks again Olaiho...I should've just got your email addy last time ;)

    You're right, I wasn't quite sure about 480P but assumed the "p" was for progressive - as Projector Central said my Pj wasn't 480P I figured my Projector (no matter if fed a Progressive signal) would still not display PS at any resolution, higher or lower.

    So basically, a 480P/576P/HDTV(?) enabled projector isn't going to give me any further benefits when I connect using VGA (but will if I use component)?

    So the only things I could improve on are noise level (40dB+ yes please!!!!), brightness etc?

    Oh, and I did tweak with your page/link last week and had noticable improvements.

    Thanks again :)
     
  4. olaiho

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    Every new LCD and DLP projector has a deinterlacer, which when fed an interlaced signal, will turn it into a progressive picture. Yes, your projector has a deinterlacer too.

    The deinterlacer in a projector is usually quite bad, and is only designed for video based material. It's like the "Bob" deinterlace algorithm in software DVD players. Film material doesn't look too good. Why don't manufacturers include a proper deinterlacer, then? Cost reduction, maybe. However, the deinterlacer is NOT in use with a progressive component or a VGA signal, because the source is already progressive. EDIT: Forgot to add: not all projectors are able to display a progressive component signal.

    Progressive DVD players and some of the newer projectors have adaptive deinterlacing circuits such as the Faroudja DCDi, which are optimized for both video and film. It's better to have the deinterlacer inside the player, because then the deinterlacing is done digitally inside the player-> one less DA conversion.

    In addition to the deinterlacer, all projectors have a scaler. What the scaler does, is take any form of picture that is fed into the projector, and make it fill the panel. Imagine feeding a 640x480 picture to your XGA projector: it's the the scaler that stretches the image to fill the whole screen. The scaler is always in use with a composite, s-video or component connection, and also when feeding the projector a non-native VGA signal. It's also the scaler that does all the refresh rate conversions.

    With VGA/DVI, you can bypass both the scaler and the deinterlacer. With a progressive component signal you can bypass the deinterlacer.

    So, a properly adjusted PC is the best picture source for any projector, because it is as straight a feed into the projector as possible. Progressive component comes second, then interlaced component, s-video and composite.

    But the PC isn't nearly as user friendly as a standalone player... And with the new widescreen models it takes a bit of tinkering to get it work in 1:1... Decisions, decisions.

    So what would you get if you upgrade your projector?

    - better contrast
    - better lamp life
    - better black levels (your current PJ is a data model with a high light output)
    - better noise levels
    - better color reproduction
    - better connections

    Of course a projector upgrade will bring you some improvement, but you have to consider: is it really worth the required ~2000£? Ask your dealer if he will lend you a, say, Sony VPL-HS10 for testing: always see for yourself how much better the picture actually is! Don't trust forums or marketing. Your current projector might even come quite close to a new projector...

    Well, I'm just rambling but I hope that some of this will make the whole thing clearer for you to understand.

    Regards,
    Olaiho
     
  5. Goof

    Goof
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    Thank you for clearing that up Olaiho - I completely understand now that I can get PS with my Pj by feeding a PS signal that by-passes the scaler and the deinterlacer :)

    As for the upgrade issue, I don't want it to seem like I am just doing it for the sake of it and that I have loads of cash (far from it :eek: ) but the way I see it I can get back roughly what I paid for my Pj and add £100 and improve on the noise level (which at 40+dB has to be sorted) and may get component/better contrast into the bargain.

    Regards,
    Goof :)
     

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