Answered Xeon vs i7 cpu for gaming

PC5354uk

Novice Member
Hi I need some help i have 2 xeon e5-2630 v2 cpu wondering would they be anygood for gaming ? or am i better off selling them and buy a i7 cpu ? thanks for help
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Depends which i7 CPU you are getting as there a lot and what you are going to spend.

Is it a dual CPU MB or just single? With Xeon's you often have to use ECC memory which drives up the cost even more.

However the main problem is the relatively low clock speed its turbo is only 2.8GHz (2.3 non) so compared to a more recent i7 its going to be relatively slow and you won't be able to overclock.

To an old school i7-4790k

Intel Xeon E5-2630 vs Core i7 4790K

I use an overclocked i7-5820k 3.3 -> 4.5 which should in theory outperform a 4790k but the link below is stock speed.

Intel Xeon E5-2630 vs Core i7 5820K
 

PC5354uk

Novice Member
Depends which i7 CPU you are getting as there a lot and what you are going to spend.

Is it a dual CPU MB or just single? With Xeon's you often have to use ECC memory which drives up the cost even more.

However the main problem is the relatively low clock speed its turbo is only 2.8GHz (2.3 non) so compared to a more recent i7 its going to be relatively slow and you won't be able to overclock.

To an old school i7-4790k

Intel Xeon E5-2630 vs Core i7 4790K

I use an overclocked i7-5820k 3.3 -> 4.5 which should in theory outperform a 4790k but the link below is stock speed.

Intel Xeon E5-2630 vs Core i7 5820K
Thanks for replying, i have 32gb ddr3 ecc memory already am thinking to sell the CPU and the memory but not too sure if i should go for i7 or ryzen cpu.
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
You're looking at the Sandy Bridge varient there Chuck, the v2 variant is Ivy Bridge and has (slightly) faster clockspeeds at 2.6Ghz base, 2.9Ghz six core turbo.

An E5-2630 V2 would be a perfectly acceptable CPU for gaming (the second CPU would add very little).

Generally games are strongly dependant on single threaded performance for consistent frame times, so do tend to run at their best on the highest clocked CPUs (particularly if you want high frame rates, rather than normal frame rates and high resolution). Most aren't particularly highly threaded, so four or six cores is perfectly acceptable.

Whether it's worth selling them and replacing depends on what you'll get and how fussed about top end performance you are.
 

PC5354uk

Novice Member
You're looking at the Sandy Bridge varient there Chuck, the v2 variant is Ivy Bridge and has (slightly) faster clockspeeds at 2.6Ghz base, 2.9Ghz six core turbo.

An E5-2630 V2 would be a perfectly acceptable CPU for gaming (the second CPU would add very little).

Generally games are strongly dependant on single threaded performance for consistent frame times, so do tend to run at their best on the highest clocked CPUs (particularly if you want high frame rates, rather than normal frame rates and high resolution). Most aren't particularly highly threaded, so four or six cores is perfectly acceptable.

Whether it's worth selling them and replacing depends on what you'll get and how fussed about top end performance you are.
I see so i guess its better for me to get a fast clockspeed CPU would be better if i want higher frame rates, maybe i should get rid of the 2 xeon cpu and use that money to buy a higher clock CPU for gaming.
 

PC5354uk

Novice Member
Any good recommendations on older i7 generation cpu still good for gaming and worth the money ???
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
You're looking at the Sandy Bridge varient there Chuck, the v2 variant is Ivy Bridge and has (slightly) faster clockspeeds at 2.6Ghz base, 2.9Ghz six core turbo.

An E5-2630 V2 would be a perfectly acceptable CPU for gaming (the second CPU would add very little).

Generally games are strongly dependant on single threaded performance for consistent frame times, so do tend to run at their best on the highest clocked CPUs (particularly if you want high frame rates, rather than normal frame rates and high resolution). Most aren't particularly highly threaded, so four or six cores is perfectly acceptable.

Whether it's worth selling them and replacing depends on what you'll get and how fussed about top end performance you are.
Oops, the v2 according to Intel is 2.6 and 3.1 turbo but hey ho.

For most games as you state you would benefit from the higher clock speed. That does become the limiting factor, I can notice if my proc decides to revert back to stock on the fps.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
I am still not convinced it would be that good a choice for gaming, sure it depends on what games etc. and the GPU but in general.

Whilst I am not overly keen on artificial benchmarks on Firestrike it gets 7770 which is pretty down in the pecking order and you can't overclock in an easy manner so you are stuck with it.

If you are spending around 180 on a processor then that's about the going rate for a i7 4770k on the bay which would get you around 9330 on stock but there is plenty of room to overclock that and get a higher score. (Those are user submit scores so buyer beware :))

Also you tie yourself into a particular type of motherboard.
 

EndlessWaves

Distinguished Member
I am still not convinced it would be that good a choice for gaming, sure it depends on what games etc. and the GPU but in general.
I didn't think Firestrike gave CPU scores? Only framerate-dependant physics scores? Restricting it to a GTX 1080ti GPU on Firestrike Extreme it gets similar scores to an i5-4460, so not exactly slow.

If you really wanted to push the boundaries then you'd want the latest and greatest, but for just enjoying games it's fine

Looking at the prices:

X79 motherboards on ebay are averaging around £150. Your CPUs seem to go for about £80 each.

So your current setup would cost you around £70 to get working if you sold one of the two CPUs. Maybe a little more for ECC memory support.


If you sold both CPUs for £160 and added the £70 you'd be able to spend £230 on a new motherboard, memory and CPU. I think you'll struggle to get anything significantly faster for that, even if you went for 8GB instead of 16GB of memory.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
The memory he already has so can sell that too so the 230 would be MB and CPU only. He has 32GB of ECC ram which he could sell.

It depends on the games he wants to play really and what GPU he is going to plug in.
 

PC5354uk

Novice Member
Thanks guys for the help, looking to play games like pubg overwatch call of duty thinking 1050ti or 1060.
I think i will try sell bother my cpu for £160 and i could sell my 32gb ddr3 ecc ram as well.
 

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