Xarus 5000's give off to much bass

qwazew

Standard Member
I am quite new to mixing and matching a hifi, so please bear with me. My Xarus 5000 speakers give off too much bass.

I have tried turning the bass down and raising the treble trying to improve and have invested in an equaliser which has helped somewhat. The speakers are bi-wired so I have turned off the two lower bass cones. The volume knob rarely goes above a 1/8th, any louder and the bass reverberates around the entire building.

I have come across pair celestion F2 speakers on gumtree for £55 which look as if they will give more mid/treble with minimal bass. Would these be worth buying? I listen to hendrix, the white stripes, space buddha at weekends but mostly listen to :blush: radio 4 during the week.

My current setup is

amplifier denon pma-500ae
cd player denon dcd-825
tuner denon tu-260
equaliser technics sh-e50
speakers wharfdale xarus 5000
 

Ben Jammin

Active Member
You bought DJ speakers, what did you expect? :)

Nearly any hi-fi speaker will give much less bass. I happen to have the Xarus and the Bass is great fun but sometimes overwhelming.

If you really want light bass get some small standmounts.
 
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BlueWizard

Distinguished Member
The end result is the same, but you are short on quite a few details. Like where are the speakers placed? If the are pushed back against the wall or shoved into the corner, then no wonder the bass is overwhelming.

However, if you've got a bit of space around them, then it is odd you can't find a reasonable balance using a graphic equalizer.

Next, describe the room from an acoustic perspective. Is the bass too much everywhere in the room, or only in the spot you happen to be sitting it. It is possible the reflected bass wave are re-enforcing each other in just that precise spot. If so, there should be a comparable NULL in some other part of the room.

How big is the room?

Is very bare with lots of hard surfaces?

Any chance you've got a spare £40 laying around you could dedicate to the problem. I would suggest you get a Radio Shack SPL meter (Sound Pressure Level or loudness). Available in digital read out or analog meter read out, both are good, it is just a matter of personal preference. I have the digital readout version.

Run a frequency sweep from say 50hz up to about 200hz, and see if there is a peak in the spot you normally sit in. If nothing else, that will tell you what frequency needs to be adjusted on the Equalizer.

Here are some links to Audio Test Tones, though a search of Google will turn up hundreds of these. Depending on your equalizer, the 1/3rd octave test tones should perfectly match the controls on the equalizer, which is very convenient.

http://www.avforums.com/forums/speakers/925527-audio-test-tones-several-sources.html

In your case, just for the bass problem run the sweep as I described above. Use the test tone from RealTraps. This runs in 10hz increments with the frequency increasing precisely 1hz every 10 seconds.

Warning, keep the volume modest, and take a break every now and then to keep the speakers from overheating.

For general quick testing, use the 1/3rd octave tones (31 tones across the full range). For more detail, use the 1/6th octave tones (63 tones across the same full range.)

Some times seeing a list of numbers is not that informative, but graphing it out on paper or in a spreadsheet can give you a good visual representation. Ideally, you want to graph it on paper, or a spreadsheet, that has a log-rhythmic scale on the horizontal axis (frequency), and standard linear scale on the vertical axis (amplitude). If that is too complicated, don't worry about it.

Also, try plugging the ports on the speaker with some foam, or a towel or sock will do, as long as it truly plugs the port. This can soften the bass nicely. I had some JBL Stadium speaker that were very bass dominate, the only way to reasonably tame them was to plug the ports.

So -

- The room?

- The placement of the speaker in the room?

- Measure the bass response, and the broader frequency response with an SPL meter. Graph the results for a nice visual representation. Use these results to set your Equalizer.

- Plug the Ports. Definitely try this, it is virtually free and can make a real difference.

Just a few thoughts.

Steve/bluewizard
 
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