Would a FullHD tv make a big difference compared to...

Discussion in 'General TV Discussions Forum' started by lapino, May 1, 2007.

  1. lapino

    lapino
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,474
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    Oudenaarde
    Ratings:
    +57
    ...my Pioneer 436FDE. This plasma, which I'm very happy with btw, only has a resolution of 1024x768. HD content looks fine, but I cannot deny the feeling that somehow I'm missing quite a bit of the details from BluRay/HD-DVD movies. After all, my plasma only displays about half of the available pixels.

    Would going to a 'real' FullHD tv make a big difference? Or is it even with 1080p/i content not that obvious/logical that a FullHD would necessarily display more detail as my Pioneer plasma?
     
  2. kingo

    kingo
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    Messages:
    273
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +5
    To be honest this has been covered in many previous posts and the answer is NO most people would be hard pushed to see any real difference between a very gd SD plasma and a 1080p plasma but again everyones eyes are different.

    search the posts in the plasma section their are a few covering this area, I or one have HD playing through my Panny PE50 sd panel and that looks awsome I have also watched the same films through my friends px60 and at normal viewing distance I cannot see any real gains so for me I am more than happy to stay with my Sd panel. and I believe it will be the same going from a 720p plasma to 1080p.

    If anyone else can say otherwise please correct me
     
  3. mclean007

    mclean007
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2007
    Messages:
    114
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Ratings:
    +11
    Depends on your own eyesight, the screen size and how close you sit. If you're 20 feet away from a 30" screen, you're not going to notice any difference, but from a proper viewing distance of 2-3 x screen width, you'll notice the improvement with 1080i/p content if you have good eyesight.

    Also, I don't know what your TV is like, but some TVs make a proper balls of scaling video to fit. The great thing about a Full HD set is that it obviously needs no scaling for 1080 line content, so it displays it perfectly. 720p also displays exceptionally well, because the scaling is a nice 2:3 ratio vertically and horizontally, rather than the somewhat messy conversion needed to fit 1280x720 onto 1024x768.
     
  4. NicolasB

    NicolasB
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2002
    Messages:
    6,686
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    137
    Location:
    Emily's Shop
    Ratings:
    +1,067
    If your source material is standard-definition then there will no advantage to using a higher resolution screen. But if your source material has a resolution higher than your screen (1080i, for example, is 1920x1080) then you will be losing detail, and buying a better display certainly will make a difference.
     
  5. Neil Watson

    Neil Watson
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2001
    Messages:
    971
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Bracknell
    Ratings:
    +78
    The thing that always intrigues me with these types of threads is that from what I can ascertain very few TV's even FullHD ones displayed 1080i/p at 1:1 mapping even over HDMI. They all seem to by default scale it a bit so the picture is overscanned slightly. Why I am not sure as you'ed think that this is only required for analogue sources but apparantly not?
     
  6. NicolasB

    NicolasB
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2002
    Messages:
    6,686
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    137
    Location:
    Emily's Shop
    Ratings:
    +1,067
    The presence of overscan doesn't necessarily indicate the absence of 1:1 pixel mapping.

    But yes, it's annoying.
     
  7. Neil Watson

    Neil Watson
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2001
    Messages:
    971
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Location:
    Bracknell
    Ratings:
    +78
    True and I was going to say that some have 1:1 mapping as a choice or implemented retrospectively.

    But as you say its annoying as most people assume that if you put in 1920x1080 you get 1920x1080 when you really get the around 1-5% lopped off the input 1920x1080 and then the rest resized to fit the panels 1920x1080 res. Not such a problem for SkyHD (which I gather has a green border around it a 1080i which you wouldn't want to see) or other films/movie sources but a right royal pain in the posterior when you are trying to display a full 1920x1080 desktop from your HDMI (or DVI) equipped PC through the HDMI port.
     
  8. Stephen Neal

    Stephen Neal
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Messages:
    6,595
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Ratings:
    +920

    Watching Sky HD on a Bravia 40W2000 via HDMI in 1080i with 1:1 pixel mapping - and no green borders.
     
  9. NicolasB

    NicolasB
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2002
    Messages:
    6,686
    Products Owned:
    1
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    137
    Location:
    Emily's Shop
    Ratings:
    +1,067
    The point I was making is that there are two different kinds of overscan.

    Type A: a 1920x1080 image is resized to slightly larger than 1920x1080, then the edges are cropped and the remainder is displayed as a 1920x1080 image.

    Type B: a 1920x1080 image has the edges cropped without being resized, and is then displayed as an image that is a little smaller than 1920x1080, but still preserving 1:1 pixel mapping with the original source image.

    My 55A2000, for example, has type B overscan: you lose the edges of the picture, but you don't lose 1:1 pixel mapping: there is no upscaling or resizing, only cropping.
     

Share This Page

Loading...