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Wooden back door swelling up

Lee

Moderator
Got a wooden door on the lean to that leads to outside. It has swollen up that much that I couldn't open it. I've had to buy a handle to give me something to yank on.

I've run the saw down the edge of it and can now close it. Trouble is, when the door shrinks back there will be a bit of a gap.

The door is painted with a wood preserve and when I throw water over it it looks like it runs off OK but some must be getting into the wood..

Any idea how to prevent further swelling? Just to get through the damp months I've thought of nailing a sheet of plastic over the door or nailing some polythene over it. Smearing something like vaseline over the door would probably work but could mean a divorce if it gets on the clothes.
 
As a short term solution you just need to seal it from the elements namely water, just apply some sillicone to the affected parts and it should hold out until you decide to replace it. It should be simple no mess.

In regards to the shrinkage, as its temporary just shove some rags if required or you could buy a draught excluder?

Sid
 

ps3mad

Banned
Remember my old wooden front door used to swell up so bad you had to kick it open :rotfl:.Shaved so much off that in the summer you could come in without opening it lol.A new double glazed uPVC one was a godsend.
 

Lee

Moderator
Sometimes the easiest solutions are hardest to see. Never thought about using silicon. Thanks. :smashin:


.Shaved so much off that in the summer you could come in without opening it lol.
:D
 

PJTX100

Distinguished Member
I'd hazard a guess you typed the title "back door swelling up", then thought about the clientelle of GC, and added "Wooden" to keep the thread on-topic.

Which it has.

Up to now. :D
 

Lee

Moderator
is the frame similarly treated?

could be your problem
It is on the side of the hinges but for some reason I didn't do it on the side of the lock. Oh maaaan, I hope it was the door after taking a saw to it.

I'd hazard a guess you typed the title "back door swelling up", then thought about the clientelle of GC, and added "Wooden" to keep the thread on-topic.
Haha, you're so right. There was a couple of titles I put in that would have ended with the thread being closed very quickly :D
 

John

Moderator
Remember my old wooden front door used to swell up so bad you had to kick it open :rotfl:.Shaved so much off that in the summer you could come in without opening it lol.A new double glazed uPVC one was a godsend.

Until its in direct sunlight in the summer when it expands :rotfl:

is the frame similarly treated?

could be your problem

Are all 6 sides of the door treated ?
 

whatsupdoc

Established Member
Being an old fogey, I recall that a cure for this used to be rubbing a candle down the edge(s) of the door.

Treatment needs to be repeated occasionally.
 

deckingman

Prominent Member
Timber, being a natural product, will expand and contract with moisture content. Up to 2% depending on the timber. Not usually a problem inside where the moisture level in the air is fairly constant but outside it is an entirely different matter. If it is a solid door, the best you can do is ensure the door fits without sticking when it is "wet", then use some form of draft excluder to deal with gap when it is dry.
 

Lee

Moderator
Are all 6 sides of the door treated ?
I think so but am not 100% sure about the bottom

Being an old fogey, I recall that a cure for this used to be rubbing a candle down the edge(s) of the door.

Treatment needs to be repeated occasionally.
:smashin:

If it is a solid door, the best you can do is ensure the door fits without sticking when it is "wet", then use some form of draft excluder to deal with gap when it is dry.
it is a solid door. After sawing it, it would open fairly easily but now it's starting to go tight again. It's been a very wet and damp day. It's still expanding arrrrggghhhh.

Going to borrow a plane tomorrow and shave some more off.

At this rate it i'll be better off nailing the door shut and going in and out the window.
 

27neth

Distinguished Member
If the door is sticking again after just planing the edge are you sure the screws in the hinges are tight...

John..
 

deckingman

Prominent Member
If you look at the doors on any old antique or properly made cabinet, you'll see that they consist of a frame and panels. The frame has grooves which the panels sit in (loosely). It's the only way to make an external door IMO. Most of the expansion and contraction due to variations in moisture content will be taken up by the "slack" in the grooves.

BTW, that's also why you may notice large gaps between planks on badly built garden decks. When the timber arrives, it is freshly tanalised (or should be) and that is a wet process. The recommended gap is 3 to 6 mm but if you start with 6 mm, then in dry weather, the gap will "grow" to 9 mm. So, always start with 3mm (wet).
 
D

Deleted member 30535

Guest
When I saw the title I thought it was a plea for help from Pinnochio with piles.

/coat
 

Lee

Moderator
:D A taxi is on the way M.I


If the door is sticking again after just planing the edge are you sure the screws in the hinges are tight...

John..
Checked and the screws are all fine and dandy :smashin:
 

PJTX100

Distinguished Member
When I saw the title I thought it was a plea for help from Pinnochio with piles.

/coat


See? You should have been more specific. :facepalm:

"This thread is not about piles or any other afflictions of the anus. It's about the door, which happens to be at the back of my house, and it's swelling up".

Does the forum allow a thread title that long? :D
 

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