Wired Network - checking what I need

Discussion in 'Networking & NAS' started by PST, Dec 28, 2011.

  1. PST

    PST
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2009
    Messages:
    37
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +0
    I'm going to be adding cat5e cabling to my new house. This will be run through the walls and outside the house on the ground floor, to create a network across 3 rooms of the house.

    Living Room
    Samsung Smart TV
    HTPC (probably an Acer Revo 100 when I get round to this)

    Study
    Desktop Computer
    BT Homehub

    Gaming Room
    HP Microserver (running as a NAS)
    Xbox

    I also have Sonos (and laptops, tablets, phones) which I believe should be able to access the music files on the server.

    Looking at the above It would appear I need 2 runs of cable to each room. I'm sure it would be advantageous to add more.

    Because of a lack of tools and not having done this before, I'm having a company install this for me but I want to make sure I'm covering myself for what I need and what I should cover for the future.

    As such, if anyone can suggest specific equipment or set up to cover my needs, I'd appreciate it.
     
  2. mickevh

    mickevh
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    6,924
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Location:
    West London
    Ratings:
    +1,610
    In no particular order...

    Are you "having it done" by a company that installs data network infratructure for a living, or is the local spark doing it for you. I'd ensure they have tested the install and certified it to cat5e standard if that's what you are paying for. Most reputable installers will vertify and guarentee their work for 10 years or so.

    Just because "cat5e" cable (faceplates, panels, etc) have been used, doesn't mean you have a "cat5e" install and you just won't know unless it's been tested. That said, cat5e is pretty hard to get wrong.

    If running outside, ensure they either use "external" grade cable or run it through conduits. Received wisdom has it the UV "does"for UTP after some number of years if you use cable that's designed for "internal" use where sunlight isn't expected to be much exident.

    Looks to me like you need about 4 cable runs to each room. There's 3 devices and it never hurts to have a spare (or two.) Cable is cheap - the "cost" is the labour to install it.

    Label all (or have it labled) too. I's amazing how fast you forget what goes where, even in a small install.
     
  3. PST

    PST
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2009
    Messages:
    37
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +0
    It's an IT company who mostly seem to do this for business, after having two installers either not show or not answer their phones I decided to stop looking for a 'home' installer.

    My BT Homehub is a v3 which means 1 gigabit port on it, am assuming that means I need a switch to plug into it, then put everything else connected into the switch?
     
  4. rs6mra

    rs6mra
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2011
    Messages:
    634
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +63
    I would recommend you future proof by going for Cat 6 instead of 5e as that is what i have done. You will also be better off going for a gigabit switch probably a 16 port. Not all your devices would have gigabit ports but this will be the case in future.
    It is always best advice to have at least 2 cables running to each room and if you need to connect up more than 2 devices that you could use a 5 port switch.
    I have a switch on all 3 floors as i tried to be wired as opposed to being wireless whenever i can
     
  5. rs6mra

    rs6mra
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2011
    Messages:
    634
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +63
    Should you decide to go with Cat 6 then it is imperative that Cat 6 RJ45s are used. They look like cat5e but they are different when you take a closer look. If they are not used it would affect the data transfer speeds.
     
  6. PST

    PST
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2009
    Messages:
    37
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Ratings:
    +0
    With 2 wires into the Living room, two into the gaming room and the 4 coming into the study (where the home hub is), why would I need a 16 port switch, surely a 5 would cover everything (4 wires and the computer, then the switch going into the router)?

    And, assuming I can get by with a 5 or an 8, Amazon has some tp-link ones at what seems to be a reasonable price. Any specific reason not to go with a tp-link switch, or recommendation on another brand?
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2011
  7. rs6mra

    rs6mra
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2011
    Messages:
    634
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Ratings:
    +63
    Actually a 5 port would be fine and then you would have the others to use on the Homehub. I mentioned 16 earlier as and I didn't take the homehub into account and the chances are that you may want to have something else installed at a later date; Sky, Sonos, TVs in!

    I cannot comment on the TP-Link products. I had D-Links & Netgear installed as they are supposed to be 'greener' and power down when a port is not being used.
     

Share This Page

Loading...
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice