will 4:3 burn on plasma??

tf5

Standard Member
hi
i am looking for a new tv 37"-40". still not decided lcd or plasma.

95% of the times i will be watching 4:3 sources (sat tv in sd quality) , i will set it to normal aspect ratio where there is two black or grey bars on the sides, will this going to do the "burn in" on the tv? so if this what will happen then i should shop only for lcd-tvs?

also another question, which one (lcd or plasma) is less likely to do damage to the eyes, especialy in a dark room...?
 

kingfats

Distinguished Member
hi
i am looking for a new tv 37"-40". still not decided lcd or plasma.

95% of the times i will be watching 4:3 sources (sat tv in sd quality) , i will set it to normal aspect ratio where there is two black or grey bars on the sides, will this going to do the "burn in" on the tv? so if this what will happen then i should shop only for lcd-tvs?

QUOTE]

Hi tf5. :)
95% viewing 4.3 on a plasma would (?) result in uneven wear over time :( maybe look at LCD.
All the best.
 

Kyo6JM

Novice Member
If you use the grey bars with automatic brightness adjustment, you should be fine - that feature is meant to prevent uneven wear (Kingfats, you should know that stuff...). Just don't think about changing those bars to black (it's only possible through the secret service menu of the TV anyway).

Some people are bothered by those grey bars though...


Btw, why are you so sure that most of the programming will be in 4:3? No reason why SD shouldn't be 16:9 depending on the material.
 

kingfats

Distinguished Member
If you use the grey bars with automatic brightness adjustment, you should be fine - that feature is meant to prevent uneven wear (Kingfats, you should know that stuff...). .
Hi Kyo6JM. :)
I know :( sorry mate. :D
95% is a lot,but like you say :smashin: grey bars and auto-adjust (which i use) then...........why not,i guess. ;)
Cheers.
 

golden void

Novice Member
Yes if you only watch 4:3 TV with grey bars up the sides on a plasma it will eventually burn in, but it will take AGES with the anti-burn tech available, and using lighter bars (as most TVs do).

However, most TVs can blow up 4:3 to fill your screen either by cropping the sides or stretching the picture. BUT if you are as particular as I am about this sort of thing, you will find this unacceptable and prefer the grey bars. Still, there is hope...

You mentioned you will be watching Satellite TV in SD? If so, 95% of what you watch will be 16:9 anyways, with no grey bars, so there really is no issue here.
 

tf5

Standard Member
thanks for your answers
i don't live in the UK, and 99% of the sat channels available here are on 4:3 format.

about the second question, does anyone know about it?
which one (lcd or plasma) is less likely to do damage to the eyes, especialy in a dark room...?
thanks
 

badbob

Banned
which one (lcd or plasma) is less likely to do damage to the eyes, especialy in a dark room...?
A LCD on full backlight is incredibly bright, if I leave my M86 on 100% I need to squint my eyes in a pitch blank room, or wear sunglasses.
 

Mr_Movie_Dog

Standard Member
It won't take long to burn a shadow line(s) with plasma even if you have pixel shifting and gray bars this is the biggest problem with Plasma other then the dark scenes issue that both LCD and Plasma have. LCD's unless you get the latest Sony, Samsung, and others that use the higher refresh rates won't display sports and fast moving screens well you could end up with motion sickness and blurring images which gets worst towards the outer parts of the screen. LCD's are much lighter weight wise and you don't have the burn-in problem but Plasma for the cheaper sets will work better for you will just need to run a shade sweep from time-to-time to clean up the annoying burn-in lines or watch distorted TV and stretch the 4:3. I've have had many Flat Panels and will suggest you don't believe anyone that tells you Plasma doesn't burn-in, no matter what the new technology is like pixel shift, but they still perform better then LCD, again unless you buy the best LCD's which really do work great but your almost paying double for them.
 

albertz

Novice Member
neither lcd or plasma will damage your eyesight, its a myth to think that low light conditions lead to eye wear. The main reason for eye wear is looking or focussing on the same area for long periods of time.
 

wHoMe

Active Member
You mentioned you will be watching Satellite TV in SD? If so, 95% of what you watch will be 16:9 anyways, with no grey bars, so there really is no issue here.
Not true I have a multi sat system and a hell of a lot of the content is in 4:3 including movie channels which are 4:3 letter box so depending on his location
I'm not surprised by the 95%


wHoMe
 

andrewfee

Novice Member
If you're watching 4:3 content 95% of the time, you will definitely see uneven wear on a plasma, even with grey bars/bars that change brightness.

LCDs are easier on the eyes in a dark environment as long as you turn down the backlight to an appropriate level. They don't flicker like Plasmas do, and are lower contrast.
 

Kyo6JM

Novice Member
Not true I have a multi sat system and a hell of a lot of the content is in 4:3 including movie channels which are 4:3 letter box so depending on his location
I'm not surprised by the 95%
Why would you watched letterboxed 16:9 material as 4:3 instead of zooming it to the full screen size?
 

wHoMe

Active Member
Why would you watched letterboxed 16:9 material as 4:3 instead of zooming it to the full screen size?
Its broadcast letterbox 4:3 and I never said I wouldn't zoom it to 16:9 I only made the comment that a lot of European satellite is in that format


wHoMe
 

Mr_Movie_Dog

Standard Member
On my LCD I won't distort the screen by zooming or stretching and I would prefer not to on my Plasma but the burn-in lines also drive me nuts so unfortunately I'm stuck there.

I don't know why people obsess over letter box, it's not hard to get use to and is much better as you see the content as it was meant to be seen, no pan and scan, zoom, cropping, stretching distortion.

With exception to the higher contrast higher refresh rate LCD's they don't tend to handle dark scenes as well as Plasma but Plasma also doesn't do well with dark scenes a Cathode Ray Tube is still the best but way too much weight and 36" just doesn't cut it any more and I can’t imagine a 40” tube you would need a fork lift to move it.

[TF5] Look at the new LCD's with 15K contrast they should have the 120 refresh as well and will work very good for sports as well as viewing TV in a normal mode without burn-in problems. If you want to get by cheap then your smart bet is to go with Plasma if you buy a cheap LCD you probably won't like it. I bought an Akia which had great color but sports were a real problem unfortunately. I returned it and got a Visio which works pretty good for a cheap LCD but doesn't have the vibrant color that the Akia had or even comes close to my Samsung Plasma.
 

audiphile76

Well-known Member
LCDs are easier on the eyes in a dark environment as long as you turn down the backlight to an appropriate level. They don't flicker like Plasmas do, and are lower contrast.
I think neither of the Plasmas or LCDs can cause any problems to the eyes as long as they are not displaying too bright images. I dont agree that plasmas flicker in dark environment either. Lower contrast has nothing to do with eye damage. This means that a plasma with 10000:1 is not more damaging that an LCD with native CR 800:1. They just show more contrast.

If you're watching 4:3 content 95% of the time, you will definitely see uneven wear on a plasma, even with grey bars/bars that change brightness.
I have to agree here. 95% of the time the side bars are always grey/black. Moreover, 95% viewing is too much of a percentage not to create uneven wear.
 

andrewfee

Novice Member
I think neither of the Plasmas or LCDs can cause any problems to the eyes as long as they are not displaying too bright images. I dont agree that plasmas flicker in dark environment either. Lower contrast has nothing to do with eye damage. This means that a plasma with 10000:1 is not more damaging that an LCD with native CR 800:1. They just show more contrast
The higher the display's contrast is, the more frequently your eye will have to adapt for changes in brightness in the picture content.

Eg on a low contrast display, your eye may not have to adapt much at all between medium brightness and dark images, but with a high contrast display there will be a bigger difference and your iris will be changing a lot more.

This is why it is recommended not to be viewing in a completely dark room as it keeps your eye from having to adjust as much. A black image in a dark room is totally dark, whereas with the lights on your eye may not have to adjust at all from a medium brightness image.


As for flicker – it's not just viewing in a dark environment, Plasmas have a visible refresh rate, just like CRTs. It's not as bad as a CRT, but it is visible, unlike LCD.
 

Mr_Movie_Dog

Standard Member
I think neither of the Plasmas or LCDs can cause any problems to the eyes as long as they are not displaying too bright images. I dont agree that plasmas flicker in dark environment either. Lower contrast has nothing to do with eye damage. This means that a plasma with 10000:1 is not more damaging that an LCD with native CR 800:1. They just show more contrast.



I have to agree here. 95% of the time the side bars are always grey/black. Moreover, 95% viewing is too much of a percentage not to create uneven wear.
Let's get by this percent BS and look at something a bit simpler. If you have Plasma and watch a 1 hour 4:3 program in standard mode, with bars on the side, you will get faint lines after that little bit of viewing. Not everyone will see them as not everyone is a concerned viewer, my sister wouldn't notice them but I sure do.

As far as watching TV in a dark room, this will not be hard on your eye's and in fact is preferred. LCD's or Plasma look just fine in a dark room with no problems encountered, you have to love myths. Now if you go from a dark room to the bright outside your eye's may be stressed some adjusting to the bright light, just like walking out of a movie theater you will be blinded for a bit. You're absolutely right audiphile76 the contrast is much better that is why it is a preferred viewing mode.
 

golden void

Novice Member
Let's get by this percent BS and look at something a bit simpler. If you have Plasma and watch a 1 hour 4:3 program in standard mode, with bars on the side, you will get faint lines after that little bit of viewing. Not everyone will see them as not everyone is a concerned viewer, my sister wouldn't notice them but I sure do.
That is retention and it goes away after a few minutes of normal viewing (or executing anti-burn sweep tools if necessary, like if you watched 4:3 for several hours straight).
 

choddo2006

Novice Member
Its broadcast letterbox 4:3 and I never said I wouldn't zoom it to 16:9 I only made the comment that a lot of European satellite is in that format


wHoMe
Sky in "doing it right" shocker.

A 95% 4:3 channel wouldn't get the airtime on my screen.
 

golden void

Novice Member
Well my Sammy must be better than that then. I've watched a lot of 4:3 and 2.35:1 during it's run in period (I'm about 65 hours in) and I see no retention of anything, and believe me I looked hard.
 

Mr_Movie_Dog

Standard Member
That is retention and it goes away after a few minutes of normal viewing (or executing anti-burn sweep tools if necessary, like if you watched 4:3 for several hours straight).
Retention - Burn-in it all works out the same you can call it either but it really is burn-in and it doesn't necessarily go away quickly. However a good shade scale sweep for a given period will even the screen back out again.

My sister couldn't see it either even when she tried on her own but as soon as I showed her how it works and where to look she now can see it. I have yet to see a Plasma panel that doesn't suffer from burn-in or as some like the P.C. (politically incorrect) term Retention and I've worked with and owned several but who knows maybe there is one out there that is perfect? I doubt it though. i.e., is it a “Time Out” or is it “Punishment”? I vote for punishment

Sorry to disagree:(
 

drpatterson

Novice Member
I'm thinking of swicthing to plasma from CRT and this is one thing that worries me a little.

I understand that 4:3 can be filled using grey bars rather than black and this will help. However, what about 2.35:1 material? As the player will be outputting black bars top and bottom these will be balck rather than grey. Which is how I'd want them. But will this cause problems if I watch a 3 hour film in 2.35:1 am I going to have to 'clean' the screen?
 

audiphile76

Well-known Member
The higher the display's contrast is, the more frequently your eye will have to adapt for changes in brightness in the picture content.Eg on a low contrast display, your eye may not have to adapt much at all between medium brightness and dark images, but with a high contrast display there will be a bigger difference and your iris will be changing a lot more.This is why it is recommended not to be viewing in a completely dark room as it keeps your eye from having to adjust as much. A black image in a dark room is totally dark, whereas with the lights on your eye may not have to adjust at all from a medium brightness image.
I always thought that higher contrast helps in displaying more range of colors and helps in shadow details. If there is more contrast,it helps the eye to identify the differences in various shades of same colors.

As for flicker – it's not just viewing in a dark environment, Plasmas have a visible refresh rate, just like CRTs. It's not as bad as a CRT, but it is visible, unlike LCD.
When i have my normal viewing with 100Hz enabled on my panny, i dont see any flickers. I usually have a tubelight on, which is directly over the plasma. How i can see flickers?

I'm thinking of swicthing to plasma from CRT and this is one thing that worries me a little.

I understand that 4:3 can be filled using grey bars rather than black and this will help. However, what about 2.35:1 material? As the player will be outputting black bars top and bottom these will be balck rather than grey. Which is how I'd want them. But will this cause problems if I watch a 3 hour film in 2.35:1 am I going to have to 'clean' the screen?
After a 3 hour movie in 2.35:1 mode, there will be some lines appearing(temporary image retention). Either you could use Zoom2 and not be bothered about anything or....clean the screen: aka watch something that is filling the whole screen for the next couple of hours. So, if you wanna watch two movies, its not sufficient to watch first one, switch the plasma off, and then a few hours later continue to watch the second movie in 2.35:1 mode. You should be watching something else so it cleans the screen.
 

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