Wifi router recommendation for fibre optic network ?

4jbl7

Standard Member
A couple of years ago our village was linked to Gigaclear fibre optic cable, we joined and the package included a Genexis DRG router. The network is fine but the router is barely ok and we need something that will give a better/more efficient wifi coverage to the bungalow. We have to use an extender to get a signal away from the router.
Gigaclear now supply the Linksys router to new installations so ...

1. is this a decent router that has a good output signal, in which case the easy option is to get Gigaclear to supply/fit one.
2. what other routers are efficient and have a good signal output ?
3. is replacing the router an easy job, ie a DIY ? The old telephone broadband was easy but I have never connected a router to a fibre cable. Is it best left to someone who knows what they are doing ?

Any advice much appreciated.
Cheers
Brian.
 

oneman

Active Member
Do you have a separate box connect to the fibre line and then to router via ethernet ?

If you want something basic then try out the Linksys, it may be ok if it's free then it's worth giving it a try, not going to cost you anything but time.
 

4jbl7

Standard Member
Hi, the cable comes from the street "pot" and underground to a box on the outside wall, it then comes through into the bungalow and that is where the Genexis box is. No ethernet cables at all, all wireless.
Cheers
Brian.
 

oneman

Active Member
Hi, the cable comes from the street "pot" and underground to a box on the outside wall, it then comes through into the bungalow and that is where the Genexis box is. No ethernet cables at all, all wireless.
Cheers
Brian.
There is a thread here saying that you need to keep the genexis but switch off its WiFi and get a router that supports bridge mode.


Personally I have a Asus RT-AX88U that easily covers my 4 bed semi and even reaches a couple of houses away outdoors. What you might need to do is run a Ethernet cable from Genexis router to a more central location in the house and plug the new router in there. They are pretty simple to install, I think the instructions are only 2 pages long for quick setup.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
I suggest it may help comprehension of how to solve your problem if you first adjust your mindset a bit:

There's no such thing as "Wi_Fi Signal" as if it's some ethereal energy field like The Force or Ley Lines generated by your "router" that you kind of "hook on" to like some strap hanging commuter.

Wi-Fi works like sound, only using radio waves instead of sound waves. Just as there is no "audio signal" (field) wherever you are reading this, there is no "Wi-Fi signal" (field.)

Wi-Fi is a two-way radio "conversation" between communicating peers, not a one-way radio "lecture" like television. I speak, you listen, you speak, I listen. Same for Wi-Fi.

In order to maintain a conversation, both parties need to be able to "hear" each other clearly. If they cannot, then you either need to make (both) parties shout louder, remove any physical obstructions between them, move closer together or some combination of the three.

Wi-Fi transmit power is limited by law and most kit is, and always has been, transmitting as loudly as permitted. There's no magic "uber-router" out there with "much better signal" than everyone else. Even if there were, that only "fixes" the problem one way (and actually creates other issues.) It does nothing for the client-->router transmissions.

Taking down the walls is probably inconvenient, so the only remaining option is to move the communicating peers closer together. Either you need to go sit nearer your router, or deploy additional Wi-Fi hotspots closer to where your client devices are.

99% of the time that means putting up additional Wi-Fi Access Points (AP's) closer to the target areas and creating a "cellular" coverage pattern of Wi-Fi HotSpots. On big sites, we put up hundreds.

The "trick" with a deployment of multiple hotspots is how you establish the "backhaul" link between the outpost AP's and the rest of the (wired) network. Proper wired ethernet is by far the best (fastest and most reliable) backhaul, but it's also possible to backhaul using things like HomePlugs and Wi-Fi itself (using things like "Repeaters" - sometimes given silly "marketing" names like "Extenders" and "mesh" nodes,) though HomePlug/Repeaters both have their own vices.

So a forklift router replacement might give you a few percent improvement, might be the same, might be worse and will need to be "compatible" with you ISP. You simply don't know until you try it - it's a gamble. For the same money, an additional Wi-Fi hotspot(s) gives you a guaranteed 100% coverage area improvement wherever you deploy it with the benefit that you don't have to do a thing to you existing "router" or "worry" that it's replacement is compatible with your ISP.

Wi-Fi is facilitated by AP's not "routers." This isn't just hair splitting over nomenclature, in the field of data networking an "AP" and a "router" are very different things; it just happens that the SOHO "get-you-on-the-Internet" omni-box contains both and a bunch of other stuff. To deploy more Wi-Fi hotspot, you "only" need more AP's, not more "routers." AP's get built into lots of "other" things e.g. Super/Virgin/BT "hubs" Homeplugs, even phones. What makes an AP and AP is the software it's running more so than the hardware - though the hardware does "matter."

As discussed, the hard part with multiple AP's is establishing the backhaul - we can get into the weeds of that if you select that option.
 
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noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
Put simply, some better extenders would be your solution.

Something like TP-Link Deco Mesh system - they do various types, but unless you are very heavy users, the cheaper 2 frequency band type will be fine, and then turn off the wifi on your existing router.

The Mesh systems work by forming a connection - either wired or wireless between the access points and then one unit is hard wired back to your router. By spreading the access points around your home, you will get a much improved signal and your devices will roam happily between them.

They are set up using an app, so very easy to use and it will just be the task of switching off your existing wireless signal on the router and either entering the same wifi name and password into the new Mesh system or changing the wifi details on your devices, whichever is easier for you.
 

oneman

Active Member
Looks like Gigaclear are supplying Linksys Velop system which is actually a pretty resonable system. What you haven't mentioned is if they are free, if they are then definately worth trying them.


As Mick said and I mentioned, try and position the router part of the near a central location for best coverage though you will need a Ethernet cable from existing Genexis router to the new Linksys one. And if possible try and connect the access points with a Ethernet cable if possible as well. It probably not the end of the world if you can't connect the access points with Ethernet, good news is they are tri-band WiFi 6 mesh so what that means is they will probably a lot better than what you have today and for your needs may be OK without Ethernet back haul. Try them and see how it goes.
 

groen

Member
Check out this WIFI 6 WAP, it is expensive but it will be my next WAP.


Also you may want to check out the Ubiquiti line of products.

If your existing router has gigabit ports then you can just plug a WAP directly in to it and turn off the wifi on the router and configure the WAP in standalone mode with DHCP from the router and it will work fine.

I use the older version of the TP-LINK, CAP1750 11ac
 

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