1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Widescreen VS 4.3 & Normal TV Viewing

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by malibu, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. malibu

    malibu
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    9
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    I was thinking of getting a widescreen but would this only be worth it for Movies and nothing else , is a 4.3 pan & scan TV BETTER at watching NORMAL TV as im thinking thats what there designed for, I dont know why discovery etc doesnt go widescreen, what are the pros & cons of both styles, maybe plasma is best for watching both movies and TV, ive heard about black bars either side, does using the zoom effect degrade or improve the image,

    Malibu :)
     
  2. LV426

    LV426
    Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2000
    Messages:
    12,752
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    166
    Location:
    Somewhere in South Yorkshire
    Ratings:
    +4,906
    What shape

    If you receive your TV via a digital platform then a high proportion of new TV material is shot and broadcast in widescreen (16x9) format. All of BBC News 24, the recent Dr Who, Start Trek Enterprise, Coronation Street...... are all just examples.

    If watched on an analog platform, then this is broadcast 4x3, and they crop off part of the picture to fit it in.

    Certain channels, in particular, those which broadcast music and/or mainly back-catalogue programmes broadcast predominantly 4x3.

    16x9 is the future and 4x3 is the past. Increasingly, material will be made as 16x9; high-definition is a 16x9 shape and programmes intended for this platfirm will therefore naturally be 16x9 shaped.

    Black bars

    If you have an image with a shape different to your screen, then you have to accomodate the difference. If you have a 16x9 screen, and a 4x3 image, then the only correct way to watch it, is at its correct size and shape. This means that the extra "width" of the screen has to be filled up with something benign - black bars for example. This is correct.

    Conversely, with a 4x3 TV, and a 16x9 signal, it is extra "height" that has to be filled up - again, with black bars.

    In other words, whichever shape of TV you choose, there will be instances when the signal doesn't fit. And, as I say, the future is wide.

    Other ways of watching incompatible shapes include (a) cropping off part of the image and filling the screen with what's left and (b) distorting the image in some way so as to make it fit. I see neither of these as the right way of going about it.

    Zoom

    Doesn't degrade the image necessarily. What it must do is crop part of it off. I'd contend that this is degradation of a sort.
     

Share This Page

Loading...