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Widescreen PC gamning-What resolutions??

Discussion in 'Desktop & Laptop Computers Forum' started by Mickey123, Sep 13, 2005.

  1. Mickey123

    Mickey123
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    Hi

    I am most confused re this and have searched the net for days to no avail. Think the main prob is, I dont know what Im asking google to find:/

    I recently bought a del 2405 widescreen monitor and am most pleased with it.

    Apparently it is capable of 1080P

    How do I get this to happen??

    Also are there specific resolutions for widescreen? IE can 1920x1080 also be "normal" screen or will 1920x1080 always be a widescren format???

    What other widescreen formats are they?

    If i set windows to 1920x1080 is that always Progressive?????

    Ow - my head hurts.


    PLEASE - any replies in simple english if poss:)

    Mickey
     
  2. richjthorpe

    richjthorpe
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    Hi Mickey,

    Hi Def Widescreen resolutions are 1280x720 or 1920x1080 and both will always be a widescreen (16:9) resolution. Normal resolution (4:3) is 1024x768 or 1280x1024 as they keep the ratio of 4:3 (Exceptions to the rule are new Hi Def Plasmas where they have a silly resolution of 1024x768 and widescreen. They manage this because the individual pixel is wider than it is tall. Eg, On an LCD screen, one pixel might be 1mmx1mm (HeightxWidth) whereas on the Plasma it might be 1mmx1.2mm (HeightxWidth). This means it loses 256 lines (128 on each side)).

    LCD panels (And Plasmas for that) are natively Progressive but they can accept an interlace signal and convert it to Progressive. Personally I would keep any signal processing in the PC and send the signal as a native resolution (In you case 1920x1080) progressive. You will need a powerful graphics card to do 1920x1080p at a high detail though.

    You should just need to set the resolution to 1920x1080 in the settings and the game and graphics card will sort the progressive signal.

    HTH,

    Richie.
     
  3. Mickey123

    Mickey123
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    thanks richie

    so if i set my gfx to 1920x1080 then it will always be progressive? how would I go about getting interlaced as i have read this can also be 1920x1080 or am i totally wrong???:/

    I thought 1920x1080 or1280x720 was the amount of Pixels and not necessarily wheather HD or not IE prog or Interlaced??

    Mate, you've really shone some light here but I just need to get my head around the few above mentioned.


    I am upgrading my PC and buying a 7800GTX next pay day to hpefully manage this resolution in game.

    Thanks Richie


    Mickey
     
  4. Mr.D

    Mr.D
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    The dell panel is 1920x1200 . Its 16x10 not 16x9.

    I've got an X850 XT PE ( most powerful AGP card available) and it can handle most games with decent settings at this resolution. Apart from BF2 which will only really manage 1280x768 with decent image quality.

    Whilst I like the panel its less impressive for video.

    Unless you are specifying an interlaced display the output from the graphics card will be progressive.
     
  5. Mickey123

    Mickey123
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    Hi Mr D

    so when I set any game or windows to 1920x1080 it will always be in Widescreen and in progressive scan mode IE 1080P @ 16:9 (you say 16:10???)

    Mickey
     
  6. Mr.D

    Mr.D
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    It will be 1080p unless you have made some sort of decision to output interlaced.

    The dell panel is 16x10 (1920x1200) if you feed it 1080p it will either display with black bars top and bottom or rescale to fit the panel ( I'm not sure which I think the former).
     
  7. Mickey123

    Mickey123
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    Gotcha

    to recap the 1080P is 1980x1000

    where as the dell 2405 does 1980 x 1080

    so what does that make it?? IE XXXXP??

    Thanks

    Mickey
     
  8. Mr.D

    Mr.D
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    No mate the resolution coming out of your PC is likely to be 1920x1080.

    The dell panel is 1920x1200.

    1080p is 1080p its a standard 16x9 resolution.

    The dell panel isn't XXXp anything its 1920x1200. Ideally you want to feed it 1920x1200 . 16x9 material will have black bars top and bottom ( hopefully) or will be stretched to fit the panel ( not ideal). If you are gaming aim for 1920x1200 if your card will handle it . If not try another 16x10 resolution (1280x768 etc).
     
  9. Mickey123

    Mickey123
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    @ Mr D


    I thought the max the dell 2405 could do was 1920x1080. From above are you saying it can do higer IE 1920x1200?

    Why have Dell made the screen a non 16:9 size?? Seems a daft idea??

    Like I say I thought the max the dell can do was 1920x1080 - confused:/

    Is there a list of all 16:9 resolutions you can have anywhere. I like the idea of gaming at 16:9 as opposed 16:10 seems as 16:9 is the standard.

    Thanks for all your help so far. Im half way there now :cool:

    Mickey
     
  10. richjthorpe

    richjthorpe
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    Hi Mickey,

    Just took a look at the Dell panel and as Mr D says, it's a 16:10 ratio. The resolution is 1920x1200.

    If you get the 7800GTX, you'll more than likely be able to output the full screen 1920x1200p resolution. If you want the correct ratio for 16:9 widescreen then set the gfx card to 1920x1080p but your desktop will have black bars at the top and bottom. Try both ways and see how you feel about it.

    Just a note on Interlace and Progressive. Interlace came about because the old TVs (CRT) weren't quick enough to display a picture in one hit. By the time it would get to the bottom the top would start fading. Therefore, to get around this, they introduced interlacing which displays lines 1,3,5,7,9 etc from top to bottom then starts again from the top but does 2,4,6,8,10 etc. It does this every 50th of a second for PAL or every 60th of a second for NTSC (American and Japanese). This is why you see TVs flicker sometimes, you can see the alternate lines being displayed.

    Now, moving to Progressive. Progressive panels (LCD and Plasma) have a 'cell' for each pixel that doesn't depend on any other 'cell'. Therefore, it can be on or off at any time meaning there isn't a need for alternate lines being drawn. This gets rid of the flicker and introduces smoother images.

    On my LCD, I have the option to change from Interlace to Progressive and on a still picture (The Freeview Tv Guide for example) I can see the difference with the icons flickering and not when I change.

    Hope I haven't fried your brain too much !

    Richie.
     
  11. NicolasB

    NicolasB
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    Probably because it allows you to run either 1920x1080 or 1600x1200, both at native resolution. If the screen were 1920x1080 and you wanted to run it in 4:3 mode you'd have to turn it down to 1280x1024.


    A few other clarifications:


    1) Virtually all signals going from a PC to a monitor are progressive. Even there is a way to make them interlaced, you wouldn't want to. If you're running Windows at any given resolution, then your output will, I am sure, be progressive.


    2) An LCD monitor is what's called a "fixed-pixel" display. That means that each pixel visible on the screen has an actual, physical structure. (This is different from the way an old CRT monitor works).

    The best way to drive an LCD monitor is therefore to run it at a resolution that is exactly the same as the monitor resolution - in this case, 1920x1200.


    3) If you run at less than 1920x1200 then one of two things will happen. Either the monitor itself will internally resize the image it is getting to fill the screen, or you will see black bars along the top, bottom and/or sides of the screen, with the active display in the middle.

    You can control which of these things happens with an option on the monitor itself. Go into the monitor menu called "image settings". There are three options in there, called "1:1", "aspect" and "stretch".

    If you use "1:1" then each pixel in your Windows output will be sent to one real monitor pixel, and there will be black borders round the outside.

    If you use "stretch" then Windows will be stretched to fill the whole screen - this means everything will be the wrong shape.

    If you use "aspect" then everything will be stretched as much as it can be without affecting the shape.

    For example: suppose something is running at a resolution of 800x600. In "1:1" mode, only 800x600 pixels in the middle of the screen will be used, and the rest of the screen is black.

    In "aspect" mode the display will be blown up to twice as big - each Windows pixel is now being displayed across 4 monitor pixels. So the picture is much bigger, but much less sharp.

    In "stretch" mode 800x600 will get stretched to fill the whole screen, which will make everything too fat and wide compared to its height.

    I usually leave my 2405FPW set to "aspect".

    An annoying habit of the monitor is that you can't change this setting while running at 1920x1200. Don't ask me why. You have to go to a lower resolution to change the setting.


    4) If a particular Windows resolution is "widescreen", all that means is that the ratio of horizontal pixels to vertical pixels is 16:9 rather than 4:3.

    Some common 4:3 (or approximately 4:3) resolutions:

    - 640x480
    - 800x600
    - 1024x768
    - 1152x864
    - 1280x1024
    - 1600x1200
    Some common 16:9 resolutions:

    - 852x480
    - 1024x576
    - 1280x720
    - 1366x768
    - 1920x1080



    5) As mentioned above, the best resolution to run Windows at is 1920x1200. If it’s possible to run a game at 1920x1200 then this is also best - but very few games will run at that resolution because it's non-standard.
    If a game won't run at 1920x1200 then you should set the monitor into "aspect" or "1:1" mode and choose a lower resolution.

    Many games will run at 1920x1080, which looks very good (black bars top and bottom of the screen). Virtually all modern games will run at 1600x1200, which also looks very good (black bars at the sides of the screen). Which you use is going to depend on the game - some games look better at 1600x1200, others look better at 1920x1080.

    If you can’t get the game to run at 1920x1080 or 1600x1200 then run it at the highest resolution you can, and set the monitor to "1:1" if you want a small, clear, sharp image, or "aspect" if you want a large, blurrier image.


    6) Windows resolutions are not normally described as "1080i" or "720p" or whatever - those are labels that describe recorded or broadcast video formats. But if you want a list of which Windows resolutions they correspond to, here it is:

    480i (NTSC DVD, non-progressive-scan player) is 720x480, interlaced.
    480p (NTSC DVD, prog scan player) is 720x480 progressive.
    576i (PAL DVD in non-prog player, Sky, Freeview, etc.) is 720x576 interlaced.
    576p (PAL DVD, prog scan) is 720x576 progressive.
    720p (hi-def) is 1280x720 progressive.
    1080i (hi-def) is 1920x1080 interlaced.
    1080p (beyond current hi-def) is 1920x1080 interlaced.
     
  12. Mickey123

    Mickey123
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    @ Richie

    Thanks for your info. Although I have subscribed to this thread I havent had any email to say this has been updated. I would have replied allot quicker had I known.

    @Nicholas

    Thanks for the PM to make me awares of the updates

    I loved your reply. Its like the dummies guide to the 2405- Just what I needed.

    To clarify in laymans terms

    1- forget all the resolutions. I need either 1920x1080 (16:9) or 1600x1200 (4:9)

    2- 1:1 and aspect (I didn't even know these exsisted :eek: )
    1:1 = sharp smaller picture
    Aspect = Larger blury picture.
    Fill = Dont even go there!!!!

    Everything from a PC to a monitor is progresive.

    Hows that for a summary ;)


    Thank you all for your help


    Mickey
     

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