'why Your Hdtv May Only Be Half As Clear As You Think'

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs Forum' started by the id, Mar 19, 2006.

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  1. the id

    the id
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    'WHY YOUR HDTV MAY ONLY BE HALF AS CLEAR AS YOU THINK':eek:

    Quote form the Daily Mail March 18th 2006....
    HD broadcasts offer up to two million pixels, 99% of 'HD-ready' tv's sold to British homes can show only 921,600 pixels, just 44% of the full potential. The number of pixels is key, the greater number the more detail in the image.

    Comment from Brian Robertson 'People are being misled. It is clear to me that the sales people pushing these TVs do not know about this issue themselves'.

    Manufacturers and retailers could end up cashing in twice. There seems to be a significant difference in HD-ready tv's and 'full' HDTV.

    HD-ready tv pixel count 921,000 approx pixel count.
    Full HDTV pixel count 2,000,000 approx pixel count.

    Your comments would be appreciated.

    I have just spent the better part of £2000 on a Samsung LE41M61BX.
     
  2. blakey1

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  3. rooster-x

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    Well my Plasma will do 1024*768 so that equals 786432 pixels, so I'm covered for 720p which is 1024*720 equals 737280

    1980*1080 equals 2138400 pixels, but there is very little on the market capable of displaying or generating this at progressive. Yes it is more picture, but to be honest you'll have to wait a few more years before it becomes the norm. Think there is a Fujitsu plasma that can handle 1080p and I expect there are some LCD's although I don't know of any. New plasma's from Panasonic and Pioneer releasing this year with 1080p, but at a premium price. Expect the new HD-DVD formats to support 1080p eventually (note not immediately).

    So as anyone else will tell you on the forum, enjoy what you have now, there is always somthing better coming around the corner.

    cya

    Rooster-X
     
  4. pixelated

    pixelated
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    What a crazy newspaper that can be at times. If number of pixels is key my LCD should look better than my Plasma with HD.... it doesn't.

    I'm not sure I agree with "true HD-Ready" either really... what does "true" mean? If you imagine a GCSE exam there's higher tier and foundation... higher tier doesn't mean it's a "true" GCSE and foundation isn't... just one has more potential to get more! 720p *is* HD, it just isn't 1080p...
     
  5. lexmeister2

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    That's not actually correct, 720p is 1280*720 so your screen will be playing with the image more than screens that have 1366*768 resolution, although i'm not sure how much of a difference it'll make.

    Its true that there aren't many screens (if any) currently available that can display a full 1920*1080 image, but its going to be a while before we have source material at that resolution so its not something I'm too worried about
     
  6. the id

    the id
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    There is a point where the human eye and ear cannot percieve a difference no matter how good a component is.
    After reading all the comments regarding the resolution of HD visuals it seems the conclusion is to not worry about specifics and the small details 'now'.

    At this moment in time native resolutions of HD-ready tv's is not that important.

    It may be the 'Daily Mail' getting it wrong again, but I see the reasons behind a large percentage of manufacturers giving us HD-ready not so called 'Full' HDTV is in their best interests.

    Broadcasts at HD will be output at 720p for the next 5-10 years but eventually this will change to 1080p.
    The tv's we purchase now will then truly be outdated, and like 2005/2006 - 2011/2012 will be the years we start to purchase our new tv?

    This keeps the perpetual consumer purchasing scenario going.

    Whatever individual views on the subject you cannot change the fact HD-ready is still not completely HD, even when a 720p picture is better than a 1080p one when up/downscaling are taken into account!
     
  7. Evil Engineer

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    Blame Sony for this one.

    I think they started using the "True HD" term first with PS3 as a way of saying our HD is more HD than Microsoft's.

    It seems that the rest of the industry is starting to adopt the term as way of pushing 1080p screens. You can't really blame them, with the constant price errosion in the market they need something more "high end" to restore their margins.

    And let's be fair. If you want to see every last pixel from a Bluray/HD-DVD disc or 1080i broadcast (deinterlacing issues aside) then you need a 1080p display. A 720 or 768 line display will always have to throw some of this information away.

    Obviously this doesn't address the screen size:viewing distance ratio. In the vast majority of domestic situations anything over 720p can't really be made out due to the limitations of the human eye (for a 50" screen you need to be less than 2m away to benifit from 1080p).

    I don't know what the right marketing term to use would be. 720p is a legitimate HD format so you could quite rightly describe a 720/768 line display as "true" High definition. But 1080 lines is always going to be "more" HD than 720 lines.

    Perhaps "Full HD" or "HD Max" would be better. It looks like "True HD" has stuck for 1080p displays, probably because it differentiates between 1080 line displays that can only take 1080i inputs and those that can take a full fat 1080p input.
     
  8. Argee1977

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    Daily Mail reports that anything under 1080p HD will affect house prices in the SouthEast due to the illegal immigrant problem. (thats more like the Daily Mail)


    :rotfl:
     
  9. bumper31

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  10. ninja168

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    My "HD Ready" Panny PV500 is only 1024x720. Does that mean I was misled as being even HD Ready let along Full Hd Ready :(
     
  11. hornydragon

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    What is HD ready? What does it mean ? Who cares? EICTA set out what HD ready means as it is their trademark the own the name and logo (they are a consortium of manufacturers) Oh and it only applies to Europe do a search for EICTA i have lost count of the number of times have explained and linked to what "HD ready" actualy is.

    Here is what it isnt! Any guarentee of PQ no reason a "HD ready" TV will look better than a none "HD ready" one its also no guarentee of being futureproof ( a nonsensical concept)
     
  12. pixelated

    pixelated
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    No - your PV500 is HD-Ready as far as the specifications go. :) The pixels are slightly elongated which is why it gives a 16:9 image rather than a 4:3!
     
  13. hornydragon

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    true but not the reason it is HD ready
     
  14. ninja168

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    Thanks. I recall seeing something about Panny having elongated pixels. Why is this and why does it not distort the picture beacuse of this? Can you direct me to guide explaining this phenomenon, I'm rather facinated to learn more about this.

    @Horny - Yeah, I also feel a lot of this HD Readyness is just marketing speil.
     
  15. hornydragon

    hornydragon
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    I dont know a site which gives better explination than this one....have a search
     
  16. iendicott

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    Horny does a TV to be full HD ready have to have a HDMI socket or something ?
     
  17. blakey1

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    Most people will say that to be full HD a screen need to have 1920x1080 pixels and also accept a 1080p signal. This I think is the only difference to the Standard HD ready logo. People need to remember that HD ready only means that the TV has the minimun needed to meet HD standards.

    As others have said HD ready is really there for the general public who know little about HD. In reality people should judge a TV on its PQ rather than simply on how many pixels it has.
     
  18. iendicott

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    This is what I found a HD Ready screen must be able to do.

    Display, display engine
    The minimum native resolution of the display (e.g. LCD, PDP) or display engine (e.g. DLP) is 720 physical lines in wide aspect ratio.

    Video Interfaces
    The display device accepts HD input via:
    Analog YPbPr. “HD ready” displays support analog YPbPr as a HD input format to allow full compatibility with today's HD video sources in the market. Support of the YPbPr signal should be through common industry standard connectors directly on the HD ready display or through an adaptor easily accessible to the consumer;

    and:
    DVI or HDMI HD capable inputs accept the following HD video formats:
    1280x720 @ 50 and 60Hz progressive scan (“720p”)
    1920x1080 @ 50 and 60Hz interlaced (“1080i”)
    The DVI or HDMI input supports copy protection (HDCP)
     

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