Why should screen always be on shorter wall?

Praetorpwj

Active Member
I'm designing a new build media room and I'm settling on a 5m x 4.5m x 2.6m finished shape but with a 132" AT screen on the longer wall.

Although it will be a dedicated room I want to have a single row of four seats with comfortable clearance space either side which will benefit from this orientation. Also the longer wall will enable me to position L&R speakers outside the AT screen giving a wider sound field and also reduce the visual impact of subs positioned in front corners which won't be behind a baffle wall.

My understanding is that it is better to have screen on the shorter wall but I want to understand why. It is a squarish room but not square and seating will be at 0.62 room length which should deal with room modes?

Just don't understand why most rooms seem to be a choice between squeezing seating in a narrow width or else having a second tier which messes up projector throwing angles and ideal viewing height?

Can produce a sketch of proposed if that helps?
 

kevin7sub

Active Member
I say it's your room do what's right for you! If you are only going to need or want one row of seats go ahead and have the screen on the wider wall. Same if you decide you want a screen width that would only fit on the wider wall etc etc. There is an ideal but the ideal will not work for most because of one variable or another. What you have written suggests you have thought about it and are going with the layout that suits you 😊. I guess one thing to be aware of would be the throw distance of your chosen projector and making sure it can project the image size you want inside of the throw distance you will have.
Edit: Spelling
 
Last edited:

Praetorpwj

Active Member
I say it's your room do what's right for you! If you are only going to need or want one row of seats go ahead and have the screen on the wider wall. Same if you decide you want a screen width that would only fit on the wider wall etc etc. There is an ideal but the ideal will not work for most because of one variable or another. What you have written suggests you have thought about it and are going with the layout that suits you 😊. I guess one thing to be aware of would be the throw distance of your chosen projector and making sure it can project the image size you want inside of the throw distance you will have.
Edit: Spelling
Thanks for comments.

Throw distance will be 4.5m as the equipment will sit in a recess outside the basic dimensions.

I’m just interested in why it’s considered better to orientate towards the shorter wall. I imagine it’s something to do with base timing. But having reworked this thing through about 25 times now I can’t seem to reconcile all the best practise ‘rules’ unless you are happy with only 2 or 3 seats or have a gigantic room.
 

Joe Fernand

Distinguished Member
AVForums Sponsor
If you have the space and some kit to hand try experimenting/listening wide vs. narrow, arranging temp seating positions etc and if you can experiment with a projector/image 'in room' that will always beat doing things 'on paper'.

Joe
 

Praetorpwj

Active Member
If you have the space and some kit to hand try experimenting/listening wide vs. narrow, arranging temp seating positions etc and if you can experiment with a projector/image 'in room' that will always beat doing things 'on paper'.

Joe
That’s good advice and when I get the room built I will definitely be experimenting but I wanted to be sure that I wasn’t making a big mistake planning that orientation.
 

shodan

Distinguished Member
I'd have thought it was more to do with the audio. If it is firing widthways then I'd imagine there is more chance phase issues, standing waves, reverberation etc etc
 

Praetorpwj

Active Member
I'd have thought it was more to do with the audio. If it is firing widthways then I'd imagine there is more chance phase issues, standing waves, reverberation etc etc
Yes that's what I was assuming but I have used modelling software where swapping the length and width dimensions gives you the same 'Bolt area' ratio.

I think there are lots of advantages to going with the screen on the wider wall if you can accommodate the throw distance:

1) Can rely on a single row of seating rather than tiered rows requiring screen to be set higher overall.
2). Can have more clearance around end of row seats and less localisation with surround speakers.
3). Can set L & R speakers outside width of screen for wider soundfield.
4). Less claustrophobic room in general.

Anyway I am backing away from this idea and will probably revert to a conventional shape :(
 

shodan

Distinguished Member
Yes that's what I was assuming but I have used modelling software where swapping the length and width dimensions gives you the same 'Bolt area' ratio.

I think there are lots of advantages to going with the screen on the wider wall if you can accommodate the throw distance:

1) Can rely on a single row of seating rather than tiered rows requiring screen to be set higher overall.
2). Can have more clearance around end of row seats and less localisation with surround speakers.
3). Can set L & R speakers outside width of screen for wider soundfield.
4). Less claustrophobic room in general.

Anyway I am backing away from this idea and will probably revert to a conventional shape :(
After 14 years, I moved my living round 90 degrees just for your Point 3.
Absolutely best thing I've done for the home cinema!
 

Dobbyisfree

Well-known Member
I'm not in your league here (just setup in the lounge) but recently changed round to have the front speakers much wider apart. It makes a huge difference.
 

Praetorpwj

Active Member
I'm not in your league here (just setup in the lounge) but recently changed round to have the front speakers much wider apart. It makes a huge difference.
This is a prospective room, at the moment I’ve a lounge setup as well. My screen is 2.92m wide and it cost a fortune so I’m not changing it! My L&R speakers fit tight inside so about 2.6m apart centre to centre.

The new room shape if I go with the conventional option is 4.2m wide. Due to screen bevel if I fit speakers outside they will be less than a foot from side walls but 3.4m apart.

If I go with the long shape then they can be installed 4m apart and still be 2 feet away from the wall. Just seems the better option.

How far apart are yours?
 

Dobbyisfree

Well-known Member
This is a prospective room, at the moment I’ve a lounge setup as well. My screen is 2.92m wide and it cost a fortune so I’m not changing it! My L&R speakers fit tight inside so about 2.6m apart centre to centre.

The new room shape if I go with the conventional option is 4.2m wide. Due to screen bevel if I fit speakers outside they will be less than a foot from side walls but 3.4m apart.

If I go with the long shape then they can be installed 4m apart and still be 2 feet away from the wall. Just seems the better option.

How far apart are yours?

If you read some of this thread, you'll see the Dolby recommendation. Then you see (once I've worked out which angle it's referring to!) that we are just over 44 degrees now.

So, we are only just in the recommendation.

It looks like there isn't anything you can do about it anyway but it would be wrong of me to not at least agree Shodan's comment.

I guess that, when people are using such huge screens, it becomes a lot more challenging to achieve anywhere near the recommendation.

 

Triggaaar

Distinguished Member
Can produce a sketch of proposed if that helps?
A sketch to scale will help a lot (you and others).

Typically having the screen on the shorter wall allows the seats to be a good distance from the screen and also a fair distance from the rear speakers. But your room isn't long and thin, it's almost square, so it is possible your would be better the other way around.

Also, you want a row of 4 seats (which is what I've gone for) and the extra width helps keep the side speakers a bit further away.

I made a scale drawing of the room, and scale cutouts of furniture, speakers etc, and moved them around.
 

Triggaaar

Distinguished Member
No it’s 2.92m wide (132” dia). Also 3m is the minimum recommended viewing distance for XD fabric.


3). Can set L & R speakers outside width of screen for wider soundfield.

1) You can stick with a single row of 4 whichever what you have your room. I was originally planning my main 2 seats at the front, and second 2 at the back, but then I found audio would be better if they were all on the same row, and screen size would work better that way too. I'm actually adding a 2nd row of 4 seats, but that's only for when there's a group of us watching footy, or we have friends over for a film etc, so those seats don't matter, and don't affect how I setup the room.

2) That's a close call between giving you more space to side speakers, but putting you closer to the rears.

3) My room width is <4m and I'm also making it smaller with soundproofing.
I'm also using XD material.
My screen is wider, so that I can get the speakers behind the screen, and then mask down.
But with a 4.5m wide room, you already have space either side of a 2.92m screen for speakers don't you?

4) Really? I don't think so. You've only got 50cm difference between length and width.
 
Last edited:

Triggaaar

Distinguished Member
What projector do you have?
and is it possible you'd ever want a larger screen?

Here's a thought for you:
My room (before sound-proofing) is 5.14m x 3.96m, and I'm putting my screen on the thinner wall.
I was just thinking, if I could have my room either 1 foot longer, or 1 foot wider, I'd actually choose 1 foot longer.

I'd like it wider too, but I can just manage a row of 4 with the width, but the room length limits the size image I can get, due to projector throw. Now if future projectors have shorter throws, that would no longer be an issue, but looking at the new JVC laser projectors, it's an issue for my room.
 

Praetorpwj

Active Member
If you read some of this thread, you'll see the Dolby recommendation. Then you see (once I've worked out which angle it's referring to!) that we are just over 44 degrees now.

So, we are only just in the recommendation.

It looks like there isn't anything you can do about it anyway but it would be wrong of me to not at least agree Shodan's comment.

I guess that, when people are using such huge screens, it becomes a lot more challenging to achieve anywhere near the recommendation.

I’m sitting 3.1m away from the screen.

My understanding is that the recommended angle is 22 - 30 degrees. I can achieve 22 degrees if the speakers sit inside the screen at 2.5m apart. Or I can fit outside screen up to max 3.8m apart but then angle increases to about 33 degrees. Better to follow the Dolby guidelines or go for wider sound field?
 

Dobbyisfree

Well-known Member
In my opinion, wider sound field, all day. Do you have the facility to toe in the speakers?
 

Praetorpwj

Active Member
What projector do you have?
and is it possible you'd ever want a larger screen?

Here's a thought for you:
My room (before sound-proofing) is 5.14m x 3.96m, and I'm putting my screen on the thinner wall.
I was just thinking, if I could have my room either 1 foot longer, or 1 foot wider, I'd actually choose 1 foot longer.

I'd like it wider too, but I can just manage a row of 4 with the width, but the room length limits the size image I can get, due to projector throw. Now if future projectors have shorter throws, that would no longer be an issue, but looking at the new JVC laser projectors, it's an issue for my room.
I’ll sort a sketch as this thing is forever evolving.

I’ve got a JVC X7000. I’ve got 5m finished depth so applying the .62 rule for room modes means I’m sitting at 3.1m. Can’t see myself going for a larger screen as I’d have to pull back seating which affects modes and rear Atmos etc.

Projector will be recessed in adjacent room so I have full 5m throw distance. I need 4.2m.
 

The latest video from AVForums

AVForums Movies Podcast: Streaming Theatrical Releases And The Future Of Cinema
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Latest News

Magico announces Titan 15 subwoofer
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Ajax Systems adds UK Socket to expand smart home options
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Best TVs of 2021 - Editor's Choice Awards
  • By Phil Hinton
  • Published
Melco update improves N10, N100 and N1 EX digital libraries
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published
Loewe launches We.See TVs under new 'We. by Loewe' sub-brand
  • By Andy Bassett
  • Published

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom