Question Why does my turntable produce no sound?

MattLeblanc99

Novice Member
Hey Guys,

First time doing this, so I'll try my best to explain this properly.

I have a General Electric C-117 (made in Canada), and I'm not getting any sound from my speaker. I can only hear a small sound coming out the cartridge (the record's song).

I have the Turntable Schematic, and it doesn't look like there is any cables out of place.

Also, made sure that the Turtable was set to phono, and not radio.

Any ideas on where I should direct my troubleshooting next? I have a Multimeter, but I'm not quite sure where to test the circuit.

Thanks in advance !!
 

RBZ5416

Distinguished Member
At 70 years old could be almost anything. Does the radio work?

Seems to have 6 valves so first step would be to check they're all lit & replace any that aren't. But be careful, there's voltages in there that can easily kill.

Probably best to get it professionally checked as wiring is likely to have degraded over that time.
 

MattLeblanc99

Novice Member
No, unfortunately the radio doesn't work.

I see, Just how exactly can I test those Valve Tubes?

Also, I have attached a copy of the turntable schematic
 

Attachments

  • cnd_cge_1947_c117_c118_sch (4).pdf
    260.3 KB · Views: 24

RBZ5416

Distinguished Member
Just how exactly can I test those Valve Tubes?
As I said, just at the very basic level of do they glow? Beyond that you'd need a valve tester & they're not cheap.

What's the story with this, is it something you bought, found, inherited? Has it recently been working? If not & it's all original then as I said, I'd be concerned at the breakdown of cable insulation that could render it highly dangerous.
 

MattLeblanc99

Novice Member
I see. I bought it from an old folk that had no idea of it's history. It looks in decent shape, doesn't look like it was made in 1947-1948
 

DickyArt

Novice Member
Old circuitry of lead/tin have migratory hairs that grow from the source metal and can cause short circuits as they bridge contacts solder pads etc. Check any fuses and see if anything looks "furry".
 

dannnielll

Prominent Member
I would start with a known source.. so say a cheap transistor radio from the pound or dollar shop. Tune it to a station and get sound from the transistor radio. Then connect two wires from accross the loudspeaker and you have a working source... use this as a signal source Try each input in turn and generally twiddle switchs and knobs . Unless some input responds then tou have a dead duck. Twiddling swiches is a good idea, as sometimes layers of oxides build up on contacts and the movement dislodges them...
 

andy1249

Distinguished Member
I see. I bought it from an old folk that had no idea of it's history. It looks in decent shape, doesn't look like it was made in 1947-1948

GE electrical product from the 40’s ?
Needs to be checked for Asbestos.
 

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