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Whose product will you be buying?

Discussion in 'LCD & LED LCD TVs' started by Faust, Aug 22, 2005.

  1. Faust

    Faust
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    I came across this very interesting article on the net and thought others may be interested in the content - just shows that you have no idea whose products you are actually buying anymore.

    Hitachi, Toshiba and Matsush*ta Electric have formed a joint venture to manufacture large liquid-crystal displays for flat-screen televisions, escalating competition for a piece of the digital living room.
    The three Japanese giants said that they will pour $1 billion into the new company, which has yet to be named. The companies plan to build a manufacturing facility in Mobara, Japan, on a site owned by Hitachi Displays, an LCD unit of Hitachi.
    The plant is scheduled to begin operations in 2006, and will churn out 2.5 million 32-inch panels a year by 2008, according to the companies. The factory will cut panels from so-called sixth-generation "motherglass," which will measure at least 59 inches by 70.9 inches.
    The companies said they also plan to manufacture an Advanced Super-IPS (In-Plane-Switching) LCD panel, which is believed to produce better image quality.
    In a joint statement, the companies said they expect that demand for large flat-panel televisions will keep growing rapidly, from about 3 million units in 2003 to nearly 15 million in 2009.
    More and more, consumer electronics companies have been teaming up to invest in manufacturing plants as they seek a steady stream of supply for their TV businesses. The ebb and flow of panel production often leaves companies competing in the open market for screens, which has historically made the industry highly volatile when it comes to price. This often can unpredictably affect revenue for the companies.
    Instead of building expensive plants, often costing billions of dollars, companies have been forming joint ventures that spread the cost and risks. So far, it looks like the risk is worth the reward for consumer electronics companies, as the popularity of LCD televisions grows.
    S-LCD--a joint venture formed by Samsung and Sony--announced the completion of an LCD manufacturing facility in South Korea. Mass production of the LCD panels is slated to begin in the first half 2005. The plant is designed to churn out 60,000 panels a month.
    Meanwhile, Sharp, the current top seller of LCD televisions in the Japanese market, built its flagship facility in Kameyama in western Japan last year. It has already started shipping products built in that plant.
    Matsush*ta--better known for its Panasonic brand--and Toshiba said in a press conference that they will continue to purchase LCD panels from Sharp, even after the newly formed venture begins production.
    On the other end of the large flat-panel TV spectrum, Matsush*ta earlier this year said it plans to build a plasma display panel (PDP) plant in Amagasaki, Japan, that will produce 4.5 million 42-inch units a year.
    The company leads in sales of PDP televisions in Japan, followed by Hitachi, which has a joint venture with Fujitsu for PDP production, and Pioneer.
     
  2. clash33

    clash33
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    I think this may be true with many products, PC's for example have many of the same components in them, but the speed or in LCD display terms, the PQ comes from how the component parts are all put together and what software trickery is deployed by the end product company. We all know what a big difference the various picture enhancement engines have on the final image we see and I think that is what you are paying the extra buck's for. More than ever it's down to the programmers to come up with the goods. This could be one of the reasons the build quality may not be all it should be (thinking of sony) as it's easy to lose site of build quality in the hunt for top PQ. Sorry for going on a bit :boring:
     
  3. Faust

    Faust
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    Thing is though for all those going mad over the Panny 500, are they actually buying a Panny or a Sharp, and in the very near future will it be a Panny or an Hitachi or a Toshiba, we seem to be fast approaching badge engineering. Same goes for Sony, for Sony see Samsung or for Samsung see Sony. The most interesting part of the report for me though was the reported size increase - huge or what? Future panels are going to make todays 32" standard seem like a mobile phone screen by comparison.
     
  4. matt_p

    matt_p
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    To be honest, I don't see badge engineering as a problem. Only the screen will be a shared component, the other electronics involved will no doubt be unique to each manufacturers preferences.

    It's a bit like the modern car business. Under the skin, a Skoda Octavia runs on the same chassis and engine (in some guises) as an Audi TT. And a VW Golf, Seat Leon, Audi A3... They're all the same car. But they're not, because each brand takes the raw components, adds their own slant on things, and you end up with very different final products.

    Panasonic, Hitachi and Toshiba have obviously found cost and quality benefits of pooling their resources for developing and manufacturing the screens. If that means cheaper and better quality tvs for Joe Public, then that's great. I'm sure that there will still be a great deal of variety and competition between the brands.

    It will certainly be interesting to see what kinds of TVs we're all watching in 2010!
     
  5. neilmcl

    neilmcl
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    BTW, anyone know who makes the LCD panels for JVC?
     
  6. scrapbook

    scrapbook
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    JVC are part of the same group that own Panasonic, therefore I would assume they use Sharp LCD panels.
     
  7. neilmcl

    neilmcl
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    That'll do me :)
     
  8. RockySpieler

    RockySpieler
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    The associated electronics will differentiate the quality to a certain extent.
    I realise physical contraints like the number of pixels will be the same.

    However does any one know if response time is dependant on the LCD substrate, or is it influenced by the driving electronics?

    Would you rather have a good surgeon with a blunt knife, or a bad one with a sharp one??
     

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