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Which technology best for displaying HD?

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by Wilt, May 13, 2004.

  1. Wilt

    Wilt
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    Hi

    When HD finally arrives here, which out of plasma, LCD, DLP or CRT will give the best picture quality? I plan to buy a 50" screen which I know is not possible for a CRT but if lf the others aren't that good for sharpness and detail i'd rather stick with a small CRT.

    Regards

    Wil
     
  2. Starburst

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    It could be a few years before the UK gets a dedicated HD channel so it's impossible to choose which display technology will be performing better.
    If you do not intend to make use of Euro1080 or aquire HD content via the net or the odd DVD (with HD content) then buying a 50" plasma or LCD panel now might not be the best use of your money.

    Take a trip to the nearest dealer and demo the panels, you might be surprised how well they perform when set up correctly:)
     
  3. beeblebrox12

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    If you want big screen, then rear projection is the only way right now, because of the prohibitive prices of HD plasma or LCD FP displays. And on top of that they are only 1280x720.
    After reading posts on this forum, it seems to me that rear projection TV sets are not popular in England at all. I don't know what the reason is. Flat panel displays need to drop at least 60% of their current price to be able to successfullly compete with RP sets right now.
    As for which technology for RP is the best - there is no conclusive answer to that question. Value for money - CRT. You can get a very high quality 57'' 1080i RP CRT TV for $2,500 that will be good enough for HDTV in the next few years. DLP and LCD RP are also quickly taking market share, but their prices, black leveland motion smoothness cannot beat CRT.
    Unless prices and availability for RPTVs in Europe are very different from America, I would definitely recommend RP for now.
     
  4. StooMonster

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    That's right they are not.

    The sales figures show that British people don't appear to want them -- no matter how cheap they are! This is even considering that the UK has the world's highest penetration rate of 16:9 "television" (CRT, plasma, LCD), 40% of European Union's "widescreen" displays are sold in UK alone, so it's not about education of "widescreen". But this would explain why even fewer 4:3 RPTV are sold than 16:9 ones.

    I think the reason British people don't want those monolithic monsters is because of their size; whereas a RPTV may only take up a corner of an average American/Canadian living-room, they would take up a large portion of a typical British living room.

    StooMonster
     
  5. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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  6. beeblebrox12

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    If size is the issue, then I would definitely recommend DLP or LCD rear projection TV for the next few years. The latest 50''+ DLP and LCD RPTVs are slim almost as plasmas at 40% the price. Besides the large viewing angle, plasmas and other FPs have no picture quality advantage over DLP and LCD RP.
     
  7. MikeTV

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    Size is definitely a factor. But also, the quality of RPTV's in the UK is awful, compared to the many HDTV's that are available everywhere in the U.S. I'm lucky enough to have US HDTV, and I wouldn't trade it for any current UK TV - RPTV, plasma, or not. Unfortunately, most in the UK don't what they are missing. But I guess the UK TV technology will catch up eventually, and perhaps even leapfrog the US.
     
  8. StooMonster

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    Hrm...

    DIGITAL TV PENETRATION End of 2004 (percentage of households)
    UK 59%
    US 47%
    Canada 42%
    Ireland 39%
    Malaysia 36%
    New Zealand 36%
    Sweden 35%
    Norway 34%
    Everyone else below Norway.
    Source: Informa Media Group

    UK only country where digital television penetration is above half the total TV households. Who is lagging behind whom?

    Hopefully your american monolith runs at 50Hz and doesn't frame rate convert all signals to 60Hz and judder the picture. ;)

    StooMonster
     
  9. CKNA

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    You can't compare conversion of only regular analog tv to digital to US HDTV. If in US conversion was only to digital tv from analog tv, US would be at 90% now.

    BTW, judder in a picture is much worse when going from 60Hz to 50Hz. :hiya:
     
  10. Branxx

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    The only technology that is currently fully compatible with the HDTV is PC based.

    Any 50" plasma with VGA (DVI) input and square pixels (look for usual resolutions like 1366x768). Such screens will fully resolve 720P material while the 1080 would have to be be downscaled.

    Larger computer monitors like 24" Sony GDW-900W displays 1920x1200.

    JVC D-ILA projectors like SX-21 with panel resolution of 1400x1050, their new model HD2K with native 1920x1080 panel, or Sony Qualia-004 also with 1920x1080 native resolution.

    Displays/Projectors that are capable of highest HDTV recolutions are all very expensive, but fortunately the most sophisticated A/V component that is still reasonably priced and fully compatible with HDTV is HTPC.
     
  11. StooMonster

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    This data is all analogue television reception versus all digital (SD and HD) television reception and is current; where do you get your data that in USA 90% of households have digital reception rather than 47%, disputing Informa Media Group's study? Would you like to share it with us?


    Probably why "european" displays have been able to resolve 50/60Hz since before time, and a typical US television is only happy with 60Hz? :p

    StooMonster
     
  12. MikeTV

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    It's only 25 full frames/second, which is easily displayed @ 60hz. But admittedly the box is a monolith!!
    :rolleyes:
     
  13. Rimmer

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    I often wonder why so many European TVs support 60Hz when no one actually broadcasts in it. Euro1080 seems to be perpetuating the evil standards conversion process in HD, with all broadcasts locked @50Hz. Native 50Hz/60Hz looks so much better.
     
  14. hornydragon

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    There are a whole host of HD displays JVC even do 28" CRT capable of 1080i!!!!
    However it is all about purpose. If its rubbish in SD then making it HD wont help! If people actually new what they were talking about it would help! I think HDTV is something that we will see branded all over TV's in the next few years sounds like it is in the US but it will just be a repeat of 100HZ a marketing tool with very little benefit! Why people always think that the bigger the number the better i dont know! except when it comes to the price :rotfl:
     
  15. beeblebrox12

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    I think the statistics that 59% of the TV sets in the UK are digital will actually be delaying the switch to HDTV. If 59% of the households have bought an expensive digital non-HDTV set recently, how will you persuade them to do it again? In NA it's simple: digital TV set = HDTV set.
     
  16. ratam

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    Hi Folks. Its not too fair to compare USA to UK DTT using these statistics. My only backround on UK DTT is from the web but, aside from the geographical differences, it seems that there are valid reasons for people to add STB's to receive DTT on their existing SD TV's. There is little incentive to do this in the USA. Analog reception works fine for most people and only one broadcaster I know of, PBS, has any multiplexed DTT stations that would improve their programming options. More importantly, more than 80% here use cable or DBS instead of OTA reception. The DTT STB's are expensive but as they get cheaper and analog cutoff is threatened for 2006 (2010 - 2012 is more likely) then more people will add ATSC tuners. DTT is more attractive for owners of new HDTV's. The FCC is mandating them to include OTA ATSC tuners soon but few will use them since they have digital cable that either carries the same stations or DBS box that includes a tuner. There are currently 1,200 DTT stations in 230 markets in the US and, without getting drawn into the whole 8-VSB vs COFDM thing, it works fairly well and the new ATSC tuners are much better.

    HDTV is taking off here this year and I hope this will spread to your side of the pond soon. If people here had half the enthusiasm that you have shown in this forum, it would happen even sooner. I am amazed at the resourcefullness by which some of you are getting HD today. I have friends here with new plasmas displays that did not want to spend an extra $10 a month for HD content. Come SuperBowl Sunday, they may change their tune. :smashin:
     
  17. Rimmer

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    I'm not sure what you mean by 'digital' TV sets. The average UK consumer owns an inexpensive widescreen CRT with analogue tuner, and receives digital TV via an STB. A few TVs now have built-in DTT tuners, but the majority still do not.
     
  18. NicolasB

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    I don't believe that. :)

    I've no doubt they do a display that can accept a 1080i inout signal and produce a picture from it, but I'd be extremely surprised if the actual image on the screen allowed you to resolve 1920x1080 pixels.
     
  19. NicolasB

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    Are there any HDTV-capable RPTVs available in the UK that you regard as not being awful? :)
     
  20. beeblebrox12

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    Nevermind. I wrongly assumed that these numbers were for digital TV sets, but obviously they were about "Digital TV" (as means of delivery of TV signals) penetration.
     
  21. MikeTV

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    I can't say - I've never seen one in a UK store! ;)

    Seriously, I recognize there are some wonderful displays/technologies in the UK. All I was trying to say is that RP HDTV's (or is that HD RPTV's?) are not as widely available/popular as in the USA.
    :)

    (ps. for the record - PAL beats NTSC any day, and the British invented television!! :laugh: )
     

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