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Which projector should I buy ????

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Vassago_m, Jun 26, 2003.

  1. Vassago_m

    Vassago_m
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    :confused:

    There are so many products out there I'm just lost. I have spent hours on the web and looking through mags.

    I have seen one, PT-AE100E and would love a 12" screen, but Kramer has said it wouldn't happen.

    So my question is to you folks :

    What projector shall / can I get with a res of 1200+ x 768+ for a cheap price and will do the job on a 6 foot or 12 foot screen.

    I'm already a skin head, and I'm pulling my FOLICALS out due to this little dilemar....

    :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:
     
  2. nathan_silly

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    I guess a CRT PJ with 9" lenses should provide enough brightness for a 12' screen. But that won't be cheap.


    Are you sure you want a 12" screen? My laptop screen is bigger than that! :p
     
  3. Klippie

    Klippie
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    Vassago_m,

    Just two things you need to decide first, how much you are going to spend and whether you go for an LCD or DLP projector.

    My advice would be to take your time and get as many demo's as possible of the models favored on this forum because spending upwards of £1000 and then a few days later regretting your purchase would be a nightmare, everybody has an opinion to what is the best projector but the only one who can tell you what you like is yourself.

    I really enjoyed looking going round all the shops and dealers with a small collection of dvd's to check out their machines it took a few weeks but you get a feel for whats right for you in the end.

    I eventually settled for a Sony HS10......ABFAB by the way, in my opinion of course.

    Have fun
    Klippie.
     
  4. theritz

    theritz
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    Don't agree with that........

    Following is from an ISF guy (Kevin Miller) about CRTs and screensizes:


    Front projectors, however, are another story. For optimum picture quality on CRT based front projectors follow these guidelines. For 7-inch CRT front projectors the optimum screen size is a 72-inch wide 16:9 aspect ratio screen. For 9-inch CRT projectors the optimum screen size would be an 84-inch wide 16:9 aspect ratio screen. Can you go larger? Yeah sure. Most projectors are capable of producing 15-foot wide 16:9 aspect ratio screen sizes. However, once you begin to exceed the optimum screen size you have to drive the projector harder and harder, which has two real nasty side effects. First the tubes will burn out much faster than with more reasonably sized screens, and secondly picture quality begins to suffer in a number of areas. When you crank contrast beyond a projector's linear operating range you introduce geometric distortion, and color fidelity goes all to hell. Not to mention that retubing a CRT projector is very expensive. Finally, the larger the picture you create with a CRT projector the more visible the scan lines that make up the picture become. Properly setup on a reasonably sized screen, CRTs can last up to about 10,000 hours. If you severely overdrive the projector to accommodate a larger screen, tube life is cut by 60% or more.


    These are his comment on digital projectors and screen size:


    The two main categories of fixed pixel projectors are LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) and DLP (Digital Light Processing). Neither of these technologies suffer from the same problems as CRT based projectors when projecting too large an image, but they have their own set of problems. Both LCD and DLP based projectors have plenty of light output to drive big screens. In fact, in the case of DLP projectors, there is plenty of light to spare.

    However, both LCD and DLP projectors, being fixed pixel displays, have picture elements that make up the structure of the picture. When you blow up the size of the picture these elements become increasingly visible. In the case of LCD tiny little pixels make up the picture. With DLP it is micro-mirrors that make up the structure of the picture. In both cases, the higher the resolution of the panels the smaller the picture elements, and therefore the better the picture quality. But even the highest resolution LCD and DLP projectors will show the structure of the picture if producing too large an image.

    The largest size screen I would recommend for either of these devices would be an 84-inch wide 16:9 aspect ratio. For other 4:3 LCD and DLP projectors stick with an 84-inch diagonal screen for the best results. If you go beyond these recommendations depending on how far you are sitting from the screen you will get what is commonly referred to as the "screen door" effect. It's literally like looking through a screen door. You'll see the little square pixels or mirrors that make up the structure of the picture, which is very distracting

    Seating distance from the screen is also key to the best possible picture

    The last thing to take into consideration when deciding on the size of the screen you want, for any of these types of projectors, is how far from the screen your main seating position will be. Generally speaking the farther you are away from the screen the better the picture will be, but you don't want to be so far away that you loose the cinematic impact of the home theater experience. There are some basic guidelines that you should consider. Assuming there is video processing (line doubling, tripling, scaling etc.) the ideal seating distance would be 3 to 4 times the picture height from screen surface to seating position. For example, with a 7 or an 8-inch CRT projector using the ideal screen size of 72-inches wide, 121.5 to 162 inches (10 to 13.5 feet) from screen surface to seating position would be ideal. Provided you have a high quality projector with good video processing this should yield excellent results. If you're seating position is going to be any closer than that you should seriously consider down sizing the screen.

    So do yourself and your projector a favor and resist the temptation to go with too big a screen size, just for the sake of size. Take into serious consideration the type of projector you will be using and the room constraints. For the best home theater experience, bigger is not always better.



    Vassago,

    Why in heavens name do you want a 12' screen ?? this is confused further by mentioning( in a different post) a 6' screen....... the fact that practically any projector ( other than stacked high-end stuff, out of reach of the vast majority of people) is going to look pants when projecting such a big image, you'd need to be sitting a minimum of 18' away from the screen - probably more like 24'.

    The AE100 has been surpassed by all of the current PJs on the market, in terms of colour fidelity, contrast and panel resolution. It still produces a fine picture, and is now a very inexpensive introduction to front projection. Other current market projectors such as the AE200, AE300, Sanyo Z1, Sony HS2, Sony HS10, Epson TW100H/Yamaha 500, as well as a range of DLP projectors are all steps upwards in the projector food-chain. Output in lumens is not the be-all and end-all of issues by which to judge a projector...... (thinking of your comment re 800 - 1000 lumens in other post)......... issues such a colour uniformity, LCD resolution and fill factor, contrast, noise levels, light-spill and a load of other stuff are all considerations. And most of all........ do you actually like the image thrown by the projector ????? All the facts and figures and other opinions (including some of the stuff in home cinema magazines....) may well give you information, but at the end of the day you have to decide yourself how to spend your money and the best way is to see the bloomin' things in action.

    The only way you are likely to make a decision on a projector is by deciding how much you have to spend on it and then see some projectors (in that price range) in action. If you give an idea of whereabouts you're located, some members who are local to you might offer a demo of their setups to give you a better idea of what might suit you.

    In general terms, it is better to read than to post an endless series of "help me" posts...... go see some projectors...... then come back if you need to refine your view.......


    Sean G.
     
  5. Vassago_m

    Vassago_m
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    Well thanks for the material, as this has opened a few doors, and I am going to take ur advise and go and see some projectors, but there are not that many in Manchester, so I'll have to venture out.

    Looks like I have a busy weekend testing the projectors.

    I know they/some have problems projecting black so I'm gonna take Pitch Black, and blade (for the quick pan scenes), other than that I'm not to sure, but I will think of some thing.

    vassa
     
  6. Klippie

    Klippie
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    Vassago_m,

    Sci-Fi is always a good tester for PJ's and dont forget a good selection of older stuff because they are generally shot differently than modern day movies, I have found the R2 version of Kellys Heroes is a very good example to try out when auditioning PJ's.

    One other tip try to get your demo shown using a dvd player using pal progressive scan as this makes one hell of a difference to the picture quality.

    Klippie.
     

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