Which NAS should I choose?

D

Deleted member 926328

Guest
Hi guys,


It's just sorta a general wondering, so recently I've been thinking about purchasing a NAS for audio storage and stuff, I used to just simply store music with USB, but I read some articles about NAS, it seems to me that most audiophiles possess one to cooperate with their Hi-Fi gear at home, so maybe it does help further improve the sound quality(?


As you all may know, there are several brands of NAS out there, which one is the best fit for me as a NAS newbie haha? Synology and QNAP are quite popular I suppose, but what about others, what's the difference?


If you can also kindly share what's your system(like what device you use to connect to NAS) with me, that'd certainly be a great reference to me then.


Best,
 

Nico72

Well-known Member
The NAS is a solution for sharing your media library (music, videos, photos) with other devices on your home network.
It is convenient, but it does not improve sound quality over storing your media on a PC or hard drive.
I invested in a Zyxel years ago but I do not recommend it. The advent of windows 10 rendered it unusable. Now it is an expensive brick full of music that can't be played.
Other brands may give better support for ageing models. IT move at a much faster place than hi fi.
 
D

Deleted member 926328

Guest
The NAS is a solution for sharing your media library (music, videos, photos) with other devices on your home network.
It is convenient, but it does not improve sound quality over storing your media on a PC or hard drive.
I invested in a Zyxel years ago but I do not recommend it. The advent of windows 10 rendered it unusable. Now it is an expensive brick full of music that can't be played.
Other brands may give better support for ageing models. IT move at a much faster place than hi fi.
Thanks for the information man, I recently bought a Silent Angel M1T, it's a Roon Ready certified streamer, and it got GbE Ethernet interface, so it's supposed to work with NAS smoothly, hahaha, once of my concerns is that the execution of NAS might be tricky to me, cuz it's definitely more complex than just inserting a USB...
 

Cribbster

Active Member
As Nico said - the purpose of a NAS is not to improve musical quality. It is (mostly) a storage device that will allow you to access your content from your local home network or from the wider internet if you choose to set it up that way. The big boys also include the capability to install / add various apps to the NAS including allowing it to be a DLNA server. They're not cheap cheap (are more expensive than a USB drive) but will offer significantly more storage and some form of data redundancy / protection ie RAID. Personally, I have a Synology with 2 x 4TB hard drives. Configured with disk mirroring means I have 4TB of storage for ripped music files plus backup for our home computer. Being mirrored means if one of the disks should die I haven't lost all my data. My Synology is a 2 disk NAS which means mirroring is really the only protection option I have. A bigger device that houses 4 or more disks gives me additional redundancy options (RAID 5, 6, 10) where I get to have more of the available disk capacity for "stuff". But that also makes it a lot more expensive.

I use a Pioneer N50 streamer that connects to the NAS and allows me to search and play my FLAC files for my hifi listening but my wife can also connect to it and stream the files via her mobile phone to her wireless speaker. My Yamaha AV Receiver can also connect to the NAS and occasionally I can stream my music that way as well if I fancy it.

Having said all that, a lot of people these days are happy enough to stream their music from Spotify or Tidal or Quobuz or.... and will use cloud storage (OneDrive, Box, Google, Apple etc) as their backup store. Arguably cloud storage is more durable and should give you better disaster recovery than a local NAS box but is probably not the best place to store FLAC file to stream to your hifi. Depending on what you want to achieve, you may not need a NAS at all. :)
 

Mark.Yudkin

Distinguished Member
If you get a NAS with DLNA, you'll be able to address it from any of the DLNA audio devices in your hi fi (e.g. any recent AVR). Since DLNA is pretty well universal, you'll probably have more trouble finding a domestic-use NAS that doesn't have it.

Any decent NAS will sound the same as any other NAS -the streamer / DAC is responsible for quality. This means you can choose your NAS based on 1) manufacturer reliability, 2) storage capacity and 3) RAID. RAID brings reliability against data loss in the case of failure, at a cost. Alternatives to RAID include cloud backup services. I have a 4 disk RAID-5 NAS.
 

Timmy C

Distinguished Member
I have been using Qnap for years but have now retired them in favour of a USB hard drive attached to a Raspberry Pi and sharing my music and video files across the network that way.

NAS units from the likes of Qnap and Synology come with all sorts of potentially useful features but unless you need them and know what you are doing, there are also dangers, as I recently discovered when my Qnap was hit with ransomware and all my files were encrypted. It turns out, in the case of Qnap at least, that a lot of potentially dangerous things are turned on by default, even if not needed, which is how I got hit. Now I'm not saying never buy a NAS but if you take that route then do learn about all the settings, sign up for security advisory bulletins and log in regularly to check for latest firmware and app updates. For my needs I realised it just wasn't worth the effort any more.

You can read about the most recent Qnap attack here. Mine was encrypted by the previous attack (different ransomware) only last December and it seems this is becoming all too common.

 

Cribbster

Active Member
Frustrating to hear that news although I am guessing you got hit because your NAS was internet accessible? How were you doing that and is any of your other home network stuff vulnerable to attack?
 

Timmy C

Distinguished Member
Frustrating to hear that news although I am guessing you got hit because your NAS was internet accessible? How were you doing that and is any of your other home network stuff vulnerable to attack?

I can't say for sure exactly how it was hit but I'm guessing same as you. It turns out UPNP was enabled by default for a start which isn't good. I also hadn't realised that you could disable the default admin account as it couldn't be disabled in the usual way as with other accounts. So once they could access my login screen they just need a password which I assume was done with a brute force attack. Thankfully I had made a full backup of everything only a few weeks beforehand so lost nothing bar a couple of albums that I wasn't worried about anyway.
 

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