Question Which Monitor?

Discussion in 'Computer Peripherals & Consumables' started by The Atheist, Oct 21, 2018.

  1. The Atheist

    The Atheist
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    Hi all

    I'm sure there have been many a question asked about whether or not to go for an Ultrawide monitor over a traditional widescreen, but my question is a little more specific. I have spent the last few days narrowing down my options for a home monitor to hook up to my laptop and I have decided on these two as front runners:

    LG 29UB67-B - Approx £220
    Dell P2719H - Approx £180

    I won't bore you with how I narrowed it down to these 2, but my primary use would be for 3D modelling/animation and 2D graphic work, so I am swaying towards the LG for the extra screen space. Only real question is whether or not it will work with my laptop. I have a Sony VAIO S from 2012 (I know, I'm well overdue an upgrade!) with a GeForce 640M LE and HDMI output. I think the HDMI is 1.4, but I can't find anything that states that definitively.

    This is where I'm hoping you guys can help me out; does anybody know if the LG will work fine with my laptop or would it be a risk going for an Ultrawide monitor?

    I live in Hong Kong so options are somewhat limited, but if anybody has any other suggestions, I'd be happy to hear them (preferably with height adjustable stands though, due to desk space limitations).

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. EndlessWaves

    EndlessWaves
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    Generally you can assume a computer is capable of outputting up to 2560x1600. You only need a newer machine for 3440x1440 and above.

    There have been exceptions, a few machines have had to limit it for technical or power saving reasons. I wouldn't expect a big mainstream machine with a dedicated card like that yours to be one of them, but only the manufacturer's specs would answer it definitively.

    Diagonal measurements are deceptive between different shapes of screens, so the 29" 21:9 is actually a marginally smaller screen than the 27" 16:9, although only by a couple of percent. (It's wider but shorter).

    So the consequence is that your extra screen space is achieved by shrinking everything down to the same size they'd be on a 23" 1920x1080 monitor, rather than through a bigger physical screen.

    So you may wish to consider a 23/24" 1920x1080 screen, or going up to a 34" 2560x1080 if you value the larger sizing of the 27" 1920x1080 (e.g. if you want to push it further away to give you more room in front of it).
     
  3. The Atheist

    The Atheist
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    Thanks for the reply. Regarding screen size, it's more the extra width I would benefit from with the ultrawide. It would allow a setup similar to how I have it at work, with dual monitors, without having to buy 2 screens. Not my ideal setup/size/resolution, but I'm working to a tight budget and it's only a temporary solution.

    I hear what you're saying re manufacturer's specs, unfortunately Sony stopped properly supporting my model of VAIO a few years ago. I've been trying to find a manual with detailed tech specs, but no joy so far. Best I have found is via the nVidia website. It says the 640M LE should support resolutions up to 3840 x 2160, but I have read elsewhere that HDMI output on a laptop is limited by the iGPU model, rather than the dedicated GPU and this could also determine the version of the HDMI port. My understanding is that it needs to be at least 1.4 in order to be compatible with ultrawide resolutions? It's a little confusing to be honest, I'd really like to try the ultrawide route, but I'm worried it might not work :(

    Maybe I should just take a punt on the Dell and save myself any headaches!?
     
  4. EndlessWaves

    EndlessWaves
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    Both the integrated and discrete graphics on your laptop normally support it and it will likely work.

    I take it the returns policies in Hong Kong aren't generous enough that you can try it and see?
     
  5. The Atheist

    The Atheist
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    If I could buy locally, it would probably be ok, but I can only find the LG at Newegg online, so return shipping would be the biggest issue. Hong Kong's tech prices are actually pretty high, especially for computer tech. I can usually find things a lot cheaper in the UK! There's not much of an online shopping scene here, either, so choice is limited quite a bit by that.

    I think the stores expect that all Westerners living here are making a fortune working in finance, so they don't care about paying over the odds for this kind of stuff :nono:

    Thanks for your input though, it's good to know my laptop will (most likely) be able to run the LG. Now I just need to find one in HK :D
     
  6. Spike_UK

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  7. The Atheist

    The Atheist
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    Thanks, that's a really handy comparison. The 29" 21:9 screen isn't that much wider than the 27" 16:9, the latter actually has more screen area, too.

    I've taken a punt on the Dell, it's slightly cheaper and was a lot easier to find in HK (could only find the LG on Newegg).
     
  8. Wala76

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    Before deciding on a monitor, it is worth reading the reviews of specialists, user reviews (always be careful, because there is no guarantee that the employees of companies dealing with sales do not write them) and go to the store yourself. Large electronics stores work pretty well, but you should not sometimes suggest poorer quality of what is constantly displayed. When you look for a model, ask an employee to connect only to it (without separating the signal) a movie player or console via HDMI - only then you will see how the image really looks like.

    Manufacturers choose between two technologies: LED edge and LED RGB. The first one allows you to place illuminated LEDs on the side edges, so that you can reduce the thickness of the equipment up to one centimetre. However, in order to feel a greater difference in quality compared to older models, it is necessary to take an interest in LED RGB.

    This technology is the only way to really improve image quality, as the LEDs are turned on and off locally. If there should be a black patch somewhere on the screen, nothing shines beneath it. It also benefits from the number of displayable colors, which is more than in the case of ordinary LCDs (the question of who with the naked eye is able to see the difference). With LED RGB, however, there are two problems. First of all, in the case of quite strong outdoor lighting (e.g. playing on a console in the middle of the day without covered windows), the contrast of the image may leave a little to be desired.

    The second problem with LED RGB is that receivers with this technology.... are thicker, practically the same as ordinary LCDs. Such "greasy" ones look much worse in advertisements, so there is not too much pressure from the marketing side. Another thing is that so far I haven't been complaining about the thickness of new monitors - for anyone who remembers huge boxes of CRT models, an ordinary LCD is already a sensational space saving.

    Here you can find out what's better: Desktop PC vs laptop
     
  9. EndlessWaves

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    You seem to be mixing together several different technologies there, under a name for a technology that's no longer used (RGB LED Backlighting got dropped because of ageing variation between the different LED colours).

    This behaviour is called local dimming and isn't much used in monitors, the high end (£1500+) HDR monitors do it but few others manage it in any effective way.

    What you're describing is a higher bit depth panel and nothing to do with the backlight at all. It's not a very interesting technology for most buyers as the extra shades are scattered between the existing ones and very similar to them. It's primary found on image editing monitors, partly for calibration purposes and partly to ensure the image is as accurate as possible.

    For new colours you need a wider colour gamut/volume, but it does need to be the programs you use to be aware of it or you get incorrect colours - so it's generally only been found in the past on specialist screens. Lately there have been a few monitors that have it for HDR mode and assume anything sent to them in normal mode is standard gamut and display it accordingly.

    I'm not sure where this one came from? Where the RGB LED backlights dimmer than normal when they were in production?
     

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