Which fan is system fan?

MikeS100

Standard Member
Hi, can anyone tell me which fan is the 'system fan' on a compaq presario? I don't know the model number off the top of my head unfortunately, I'm going to try to find the receipt tomorrow, but it's about 1 year old with duo processors and vista. When I turn it on now it says system fan failure, please service pc to prevent damage, but the power, case and cpu fan are all working. The cpu fan looks like it isn't running quite as fast as the case fan, but I've never really watched it before so I don't know how fast it's supposed to run. Any help or advice anyone could offer on this would be appreciated. If I can find out which fan it's talking about I can get another one and change it over. Thanks, Mike:lease:
 

LRk

Standard Member
HI im not expert but with u not getting any replies i thought id try

System fan usually refers to the fan/s attached to your pc case which isnt a big problem if they conk out(just take it out and replace) but if your cpu fan is on the fritz that could be a big problem. If your not used to getting into the guts of your machine( i.e. fixing it yourself) id suggest getting it looked at by someone in the know. Try calling a shop that sells pc parts for some advice about what parts/if any you might need.

Hope ive been of some help:)
 

overkill

Well-known Member
Sys fan can many any of them tbh. Whatever's attached to the header marked 'sys fan'. The case fan header is normally marked 'chas fan' (chassis fan). If you can get a manual for the PC with the motherboard layout on it, it will show you which fan headers are where. You can then trace back to which fan is connected to it.

It is probably that one fan has slowed it's RPM to below the systems 'acceptable range'. I.e. it's stopped spinning at say, 3,000 rpm and dropped to perhaps 500. Which means the fans about to fail. Or it could just be that the header is on the blink. It has been known to happen.

The CPU fan normally has a dedicated header and is identified as such in the BIOS.

If the CPU is going to overheat the modern CPU's normally have an auto shutdown.

However, this doesn't look like the case with your system.
 

Paul Shirley

Novice Member
1st: not all mboards have a system fan, in that case the system fan is whatever fan is connected to the System fan header.

Otherwise on most mboards the system fan is on the chipset, its the smallest fan on the mboard (usually the only fan mounted on it), usually making the most noise as well. Check its fan header is firmly seated and remove any dust or fluff and see if your problem goes away. Its worth noting modern boards have speed control and the system fan may not spin at all on an idle machine.

If its broken you may be able to replace it with a passive heatsink.
 

overkill

Well-known Member
1st: not all mboards have a system fan, in that case the system fan is whatever fan is connected to the System fan header.

Otherwise on most mboards the system fan is on the chipset, its the smallest fan on the mboard (usually the only fan mounted on it), usually making the most noise as well. Check its fan header is firmly seated and remove any dust or fluff and see if your problem goes away. Its worth noting modern boards have speed control and the system fan may not spin at all on an idle machine.

If its broken you may be able to replace it with a passive heatsink.
Good point. However, it's not usually connected to a 'named' header they have a smaller connector than the standard fan type.
 

Paul Shirley

Novice Member
Good point. However, it's not usually connected to a 'named' header they have a smaller connector than the standard fan type.
I'd guess its the most common option if you're buying a bare mboard, its been connected to 'Sys 1' and used a normal fan header on all the mboards I've owned with active chipset cooling.

But you're right, the custom boards used by Dell etc. tend to be different, mainly to make it difficult repairing them without a fat fee to the manufacturer!
 

overkill

Well-known Member
I'd guess its the most common option if you're buying a bare mboard, its been connected to 'Sys 1' and used a normal fan header on all the mboards I've owned with active chipset cooling.

But you're right, the custom boards used by Dell etc. tend to be different, mainly to make it difficult repairing them without a fat fee to the manufacturer!
Exactly. Dell boards for example, are still using technology that is outdated on most modern boards, simply to stop the user upgrading without Dell being in the loop. Compaq etc are the same.
 

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