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Which DVD player is best for use with a projector

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by RanjanB, Jan 17, 2001.

  1. RanjanB

    RanjanB
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    I want to buy a dvd player with the intention of buying a projector in the summer.

    I realise that to get the best from a projector I will need a DVD player which is 'slighlty' better than can be found at Tesco!

    However, the Home Cinema dealers I have spoken to all seem to say I need to spend atleast £1200 for 'something half decent'.

    Is this really true or just dealer waffle?

    Why won't the Pioneer DV-737 or Sony DVP 735S do?

    What DVD players do you folks use with your projectors?

    Any recommendations welcome?

     
  2. Guest

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    Hey m8, dont mock the Tesco Wharfedale DVD player, its the player I have and its a mean machine for its price. It was the only decent player under £350 I could find that had all the specifications I required (CDR/CDRW playback, multi-region, ETC). Would be nice if played MP3 as well though.
    I think as long as you stay away from the likes of Matsui and Alba etc, DVD players are all pretty similiar with picture/sound quality, unless you make the leap and spend silly money. Its a matter of what spec's your looking for.
     
  3. RMCF

    RMCF
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    From having read many reviews over the last few years I would have to disagree with you Floyd. All DVD players are not the same in terms of quality. I agree that the likes of Matsui and Alba are best avoided, and also that the Wharfedale from Tescos was highly reviewed, but if you go with the likes of Sony and Toshiba you do get better sound and picture.

    RanjanB, I would take the advice you were given with a pinch of salt. I would consider it crazy to spend 1200 on a DVD player (there is only a handful of players at this price anyway). This is pure dealer waffle. The spec of the picture on these machines is not that far above the best players around 250-350. Personally speaking I own a Tosh 2109 and use it with a projector and am more than happy. The Tosh machines are among the best for picture and sound (sometimes lacking in features though) and are available for very reasonable prices. The newer version of my machine, the Tosh SD100E is available in the mags now for around 170, and some are even offering it at 200 for multi-region. If you check out the reviews of this player you will see that it will be hard to beat its pic & sound. Just promise you won't pay 1200 for a player !!

    Just remember that to maximise pic quality when using a projector that you invest in a good quality interconnect, be it Scart or S-Video.

    [This message has been edited by SOK (edited 17-01-2001).]
     
  4. ReTrO

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    Depends on what projector you are getting. If you are getting one with a decent data resolution, say 1024x768 or 1280x1024 +, then you might as well buy a decent HCPC. I would, and probably will in the future.

    Rick

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    'I am just a figment of your imagination.'
    MiB 1997

    Work Site: The Sound Gallery
    Home Site: WD A.V.
     
  5. Chris Frost

    Chris Frost
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    RajanB,
    The projector you plan to buy later should influence your choice of DVD player.

    If you intend to go for a budget “video only” projector (say, less than £1500), then DVD player features like progressive scan and Component/RGB output are less important. There is little point in buying an expensive DVD player with features you can't use.

    However, if you plan to buy a more advanced projector with Progressive Scan input (Sanyo PLV30, Sony VW10, Seleco HT200, Seleco SVD800) then choose a player that has this feature too. At the moment the Pioneer 737 and Sony 9000 are available, but more players are coming.

    Note: Prog Scan only works with R1 discs (at the moment). Any UK player will need chipping to multi-region and you'll need R1 discs to get the benefit of this feature. But there is a definite benefit in picture quality.

    If you feel brave (and your projector has a computer input) then investigate Home Theatre PC [HTPC]. DVDs played via a computer with a high quality graphics card can give stunning results with projectors.

    This isn't the most practical solution as a family DVD player, and HTPC is a new and fast developing area, so be prepared to do a lot of your own investigation work. Read the HTPC section in this forum and www.avsforum.com for more info.

    If you decide HTPC isn't for you, then you are back to regular DVD players.

    Decide which features are important to you. Look for players that will cope with RCE and play difficult films like the Matrix without problems. Don't waste time on features you won't use. MP3, CDR, CD-RW playback are of little value if you haven't got the ability to record your own CDs.

    Draw up a shortlist of three or four reputable players that span your price range. Audition them starting with the lowest priced player. Stop when you see no appreciable difference in quality.

    A word on dealers. If you are going to take up a dealers time demonstrating several players be courteous and honest with him. Tell him up front that you are looking to buy a player today and offer him the opportunity to compete on price before you sit down for the dem. If he has to price match against a mail order firm then allow him a small margin to cover the cost of doing the dem, say 5% (that’s £10 on a £200 player). After all, you wouldn’t be able to try different players if you were buying over the phone with your credit card.

    From personal experience I can say there is a difference between budget, mid market and high-end DVD players. On our large screen projection systems the Denon 5000, Toshiba 9000, Sony 7700, Pioneer Elite 05 & 09 all outperformed more modest players. The Meridian 8000 I used recently is in a class of its own.

    If I were buying a new player to replace my Tosh 9000, the Pioneer 737 would get first look in. The Sony 9000 is meant to be better, but I haven't used one yet so can't comment.

    As pure CD players, most of the above will be beaten by the £300-£500 CD players sold in specialist HiFi shops. If music is a priority, I would buy a £500 dedicated CD player and the £700 Pioneer. You'll get the best of both worlds!

    Good luck



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    Chris Frost
    Regional Sales Manager-N.England & Scotland
    Owl Video Systems Ltd
    www.owl-video.co.uk
     
  6. Jimmy the Saint

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    Ranjan,

    I would ignore the dealers suggestions of a £1200 DVD player, but ask you one question:
    What kind of system are you looking to build in the summer?
    Obviously,if you're spending vast sums of money, then it would make sense to buy a high end DVD player to match your system.
    Also, you should take into account current technology. Progressive scan is the fad at the moment, but coming just around the corner is DVD Audio.
    In the States players are already available with both DVD Audio and component progressive scan and all for just £300!!
    Soon these will filter down to the U.K.

    My advice would be to hang on for a few months and also audition a few units at a less pretentious dealerships.
    If you can't wait, the Pioneer 737 is probably your best bet and retails for half of your quoted price.


     

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