Question Which cable to connect 1Gb socket to modem router

Such

Well-known Member
I'm sure there is an easy answer, but perhaps it's too early for me..
In order for my daughter to use an Amazon Echo in her university room I have to setup a wireless network due to the security protocols and type of network in the university halls.
There is a 1 Gb socket in the room that works when connected directly to my laptop.

I took an old Dlink router (TalkTalk) and setup a wireless network in the room, but I'm unable to get any internet via the socket. I have connected using the supplied measly thin grey cable from the socket to the "broadband" input on the router but it does not work - the light indicating broadband connection is unlit. I did did not have another cable to try - Is there a specific cable to use - i would have thought the supplied cable would work? The plug on the end is RJ11 2 pin and RJ45 at the other.
Thanks
 
Last edited:

Such

Well-known Member
Ok I think I sorted it - high speed rj11 modem cable....
 

maf1970

Well-known Member
Given your daughter is in a room in the University Halls then the RJ-45 socket in the room will probably provide a direct connection to the University's network allowing her to work from her room. Hence the reason it works when connected to a laptop. If you are looking to do anything else then I would strongly advise you contact the Uni's IT dept as there are usually rules regarding what you can and cannot use in their halls.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Ok I think I sorted it - high speed rj11 modem cable....

No that's to plug the router into a telephone line with ADSL\VDSL. RJ-11 will actually fit into an RJ45 socket (by design) however it will not work properly and not at gigabit even if it did as it does not have not have 4 pairs.

You would need to use a router designed for a cable or separate modem for it to work as intended.

However as Maf rightly says you would need to check with uni policy as routers are often prohibited for a whole variety of reasons. Some will restrict ports to a given MAC that needs registering before Internet access is granted.
 

Such

Well-known Member
Thanks for the replies. The IT dept are ok with using a router as long as it’s secure. Looks like a need a router and not a modem router - unless there is a way to use the modem router as a router only.
 

noiseboy72

Distinguished Member
There is. Just plug an RJ45 cable from one of the LAN ports into the socket. In most cases, that's all you need to do, or you may need to set it into AP mode using the web interface.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
There is. Just plug an RJ45 cable from one of the LAN ports into the socket. In most cases, that's all you need to do, or you may need to set it into AP mode using the web interface.

It could be and its certainly worth trying, however some unis will only allow one active device per port so you have to use it in router mode rather than switch, so it might not work either.
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
There is. Just plug an RJ45 cable from one of the LAN ports into the socket. In most cases, that's all you need to do, or you may need to set it into AP mode using the web interface.

If you do that, the IT dept. and the rest of the students will hate you beyond belief - you'll introduce an additional DHCP Server onto the LAN segment and carnage could break out and many people will be very sad.

You will need to turn off the DHCP Server in your router and give it a non-conflicting (with the rest of the college) IP address for the router's "LAN" IP address. The latter may need the cooperation of the college IT Dept to assign you an IP address, so you'll need to go talk to them. If they look puzzled, you might care to refer them to the "Using Two Routers Together" FAQ pinned in this forum.

...or you may need to set it into AP mode using the web interface.

Though not many SOHO routers offer this - you'll need to check the router's manual.

Or you could buy a stand alone AP if the college are happy with you using it.
 

Such

Well-known Member
I'll have to check if I can use my talktalk modem router as a router only. I have the same one that I use as a modem only with an ASUS router as its much better.
There is wifi in the room but cannot connect Amazon Echo to it.
 

ChuckMountain

Distinguished Member
Usually, you cannot use the ISP provided routers as routers only unless they accept a 3rd party firmware and even then it might not work correctly. Much more likely that it can support modem only mode as you already know.

There is wifi in the room but cannot connect Amazon Echo to it.

Is it a eduroam Wi-Fi network? Echo does not support WPA2-Enterprise in the "home" version and so won't authenticate. However I say "home" version as it appears that Amazon support WPA2-Enterprise for businesses so I might look into that as I would like to see if I get it working too.
 

Such

Well-known Member
Usually, you cannot use the ISP provided routers as routers only unless they accept a 3rd party firmware and even then it might not work correctly. Much more likely that it can support modem only mode as you already know.



Is it a eduroam Wi-Fi network? Echo does not support WPA2-Enterprise in the "home" version and so won't authenticate. However I say "home" version as it appears that Amazon support WPA2-Enterprise for businesses so I might look into that as I would like to see if I get it working too.

spot on it is a eduroam network. I'm not going down there for a while to try a fix, so if you do come up with one please share.
Thanks
 

mickevh

Distinguished Member
I'll have to check if I can use my talktalk modem router as a router only. I have the same one that I use as a modem only with an ASUS router as its much better.

Be sure to understand that things like "router" "modem" "access point" have specific meaning in the field of data networking - "routing" has nothing to do with Wi-Fi, it's just that in a SOHO "get-you-on-the-Internet" omni-box, router, (Wi-Fi) Access Point, modem, et al are packaged in the same box. (Incidentally, as SOHO modem/router does not become a "modem only" just by "saying so" - it needs a specific "modem only" operating mode in it's UI.)

In a SOHO "modem router" with A/VDSL Internet connection, the "routing" happens between the WAN/Internet port and everything else. If you don't connect anything to the WAN/Internet port and connect up using a LAN port, then your router isn't doing any "routing" (or firewalling, or NAT translating) at all as no traffic passes through it's routing engine therein. But that could be fine, if...

You can use a "crippled" SOHO router as a combination Wi-Fi Access Point and ethernet switch as described in the aforementioned "Using Two Routers Together" FAQ. That FAQ also has a block diagram of a SOHO router attached showing how all the constituent parts hang together (at least conceptually.)
 

Such

Well-known Member
I’ll have a read....
 

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