Where should I do D/A conversion?

cribeiro

Novice Member
Hi!
I was reading another thread, and I realized about something I never questioned myself... I have a Yamaha RX-V530 amp, and a Sony cdp-530 player. I connect both via analog, so the cd player is doing the conversion...
Now, since electronics evolve so fast, and the cd player is "much older" (in the development sense) than the amp, maybe the amp has better d/a converter, so I should better use the optic output to connect them...
Opinions?
Thanks!
 

MarkE19

Moderator
In theory the CDP will do the best DA conversion, but in many situations this is not the case.
The best advise is to try both and see which you prefer. Others may disagree, but its your system and its your ears that need to be convinced.

Mark.
 

Reiner

Active Member
Note that most AV amps convert the analog inputs to digital first (so that bassmanagement / DSP can be applied) and then convert back to analog.
Thus the analog output from CD might undergo 2 additional conversions.
As said it depends very much on you equipment or preference, i.e. you need to try and find out by yourself.
 

cribeiro

Novice Member
I see. Well, I use plain stereo unless the dsp give me the result I like, that is, wider and deeper stage without echoes. This means that most of my music I listen to in stereo, BTW. I know that the RX-V630 has a complete digital amplification, but I think my model doesn't.
Well, your comments make me think that it deserves a try, although I didn't want to go and buy the cable if I am not sure about the improvement. Moreover, this takes me to the question which cable should I use.. I suppose that the cheapest will not do the job properly, right?
BTW, I have just realized that both cd player and receiver have the same number, 530! I promise you this happened completely by chance!
Thanks!
 

Reiner

Active Member
I see. Well, I use plain stereo unless the dsp give me the result I like, that is, wider and deeper stage without echoes.
Still the analog inputs may undergo conversion, no matter if you activate any DSP mode or not. Some amps do have a bypass function however and often the multichannel (5.1) input does not undergo conversion, so you could use that (even you only connect stereo). See the user manual for details.

BTW. I know that the RX-V630 has a complete digital amplification, but I think my model doesn't.
AFAIK neither does, "digital amplifiers" are just coming out and I am not aware of any Yamaha AV amplifier/receiver which is considered a true digital amplifier.
Note that sometimes they are called so because they do DD/DTS decoding, but there are also amps which amplify "digitally". Currently some all-in-one systems use that technology and the new Sony beast. A bit confusing I must admit.

Moreover, this takes me to the question which cable should I use.. I suppose that the cheapest will not do the job properly, right?
If you choose optical I think there won't be much difference but if you decide on a coax make sure it has an impedance of 75 Ohm (normal interconnects are 50 Ohm). They are called "Digital (Coax) cable" or something like that.
Alternatively you can also use a video cable (the ones with yellow RCA/phono connectors) since they are also 75 Ohm or solder one yourself from SAT cable and 2 plugs.
 

cribeiro

Novice Member
Ok, I will check my manual. Thanks. Actually, I do have 5.1 input, maybe I can make use of that.
Sorry, I don't know what "AFAIK" means... But I really read that the 630 and upper models have what they call "TOP-Art", which is a complete digital process of the sound in the amplification stages, as far as I remember. I think that now the new 440 and 540 also come with that. Maybe they mean another thing?
I only have optical output in the cd player, so it is all I can use.
Thank you again!
 

Reiner

Active Member
AFAIK = as far as I know

But I really read that the 630 and upper models have what they call "TOP-Art", which is a complete digital process of the sound in the amplification stages, as far as I remember.
It does do digital processing within the pre-amp stage, the power-amp stage is still analog.
Just before feeding the signal into the power amp stage it undergoes DA (digital-to-analog) conversion.
 

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