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Where can I buy bright LED light bulbs equivalent to 100 watts?

Stuart Wright

AVForums Founder
Staff member
I want to put a standard BC bayonet fitting LED light bulb in our driveway lights. I need them to be bright - the equivalent of 100 watts.
According to this website I need a 16 to 20 watt LED, but I can't find them. The most powerful I can find is this Philips 12w here equivalent to 60 watts.
Anyone know where I can buy 20 watt LED standard fitting bulbs?
 

IronGiant

Moderator
They do exist, but not in a UK bayonet format yet.

eg 22W LED "SUPER BRIGHT" PAR30, 100W EQUIVALENT, 60 DEG BEAM, 840 LUMEN: Amazon.co.uk: Lighting

They are hideously inefficient for an LED though, a normal bright LED is maybe 90 times more efficient than an incandescent, these things are only 5 times more efficient. You may as well use low energy compact fluorescents that cost a fraction of the price and have the same 5 fold energy saving as those LEDs.

Just my two pence worth :thumbsup:

Edit: just realised you may have problems switching some compact fluorescents in security lights, depending what switching they use but you can get switchable/dimmable ones. such as the 18W/90W equivelants here:

http://www.low-energy-lighting.com/dimmable-low-energy-bulbs.htm
 
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Stuart Wright

AVForums Founder
Staff member

John

Moderator
35 notes, holy crap
 

Demon Luci

Distinguished Member
Sorry to resurrect an old thread but does anyone have any new info on this?

The most powerful LED bayonet fitting bulbs I can find are 12W (supposedly equivalent to 75W incandescent) but I'd love to find a 100W equivalent (about 16W or so LED I guess).

TIA
 

bigiain

Standard Member
There are MiniSun LED bulbs on Amazon - they seem to be pretty new.

There's a bayonet socket 12W, 930 lumens (approx 100W equivalent) bulb for about £12.99. :-

MiniSun High Power 12w LED BC B22 SMD GLS Bulb - 930 Lumens - Warm White: Amazon.co.uk: Lighting

They've also got some 3W GU10 at over 400 lumens (approx 50W equivalent)

I've ordered some of both (as has a friend of mine) - I'll post again once we've had them in place for a few days.

Be careful though, there seems to have been a bit of a breakthrough recently that has increased efficiency - watch you don't accidentally pick up an older design - don't just go by actual bulb wattage, look at the lumens as well. Previously, GU10 bulbs at around 400 lumens were 5.5W - the new ones are only 3W - they seem to have more, smaller surface mount LEDs
 
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Demon Luci

Distinguished Member
There are MiniSun LED bulbs on Amazon - they seem to be pretty new.

There's a bayonet socket 12W, 930 lumens (approx 100W equivalent) bulb for about £12.99. :-

MiniSun High Power 12w LED BC B22 SMD GLS Bulb - 930 Lumens - Warm White: Amazon.co.uk: Lighting

They've also got some 3W GU10 at over 400 lumens (approx 50W equivalent)

I've ordered some of both (as has a friend of mine) - I'll post again once we've had them in place for a few days.

Be careful though, there seems to have been a bit of a breakthrough recently that has increased efficiency - watch you don't accidentally pick up an older design - don't just go by actual bulb wattage, look at the lumens as well. Previously, GU10 bulbs at around 400 lumens were 5.5W - the new ones are only 3W - they seem to have more, smaller surface mount LEDs
Yeah, there's quite a variety of bulb types and wattages these days, the best thing to look straight at is the luminosity (lumens) which should now be the most prominent figure displayed on bulb packaging IMHO. This lets us compare like for like. After you know the luminosity, seeing how many watts are used to produce it is the next consideration.
 

neilball

Well-known Member
As the previous post suggests, it is the lumen output that is important not the rated power. For example the 11W B22 classic LED from Megaman has an output of 1055 lumens, significantly higher than some of the other lamps listed above. However this is still not as bright as a 100w incandescent lamp which will have a lumen output of around 1500 lumens.
 

Confucius

Active Member
I've found LEDs (in ceiling mounts anyway) appear brighter than their stated output. Perhaps this is because LED bulbs emit most of their light in one hemisphere?

Replaced a 150 W equivalent CFL with a 12W LED and the room is just as bright. Previous to the CFL the room had a 100W incandescent bulb, the CFL was brighter and about a year old when substituted by the LED: most of the output is downwards with not so much up to the ceiling.
 

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