When would I need eARC if all devices are connected to receiver?

moonslice

Novice Member
I have all devices, including my TV connected to my A/V receiver for all incoming and outgoing video and audio.

When would I need eARC if this is the case?
  • When watching TV through my Smart TV?
  • When watching TV through my firestick / dvr / bluray?
I can't quite figure out a situation when signal is both going in and out of the hdmi cable connection between the TV and Receiver.

I have a Sony X950G (x905H firmware) and I'm planning on getting a Sansumg QN90A which doesn't have eARC on the hdmi 2.1 connection
 

mikej

Well-known Member
eARC allows you to hear sound from the TV's inbuilt tuners and smart apps (and any external devices connected directly to the TV) through your AV amp / surround sound system, provided your AV amp is also eARC-enabled. It's an alternative to using the TV's optical audio output and saves using that additional cable, plus had other benefits including support for more-advanced audio formats and the ability to control the amp's volume using the TV remote (via HDMI-CEC)

There's further explanation and a table of the differences between optical, ARC and eARC here.

Most TVs these days have at least one ARC or eARC-enabled HDMI port.
 

Jamie

Distinguished Member
I can't quite figure out a situation when signal is both going in and out of the hdmi cable connection between the TV and Receiver.
There isn't a situation where that can happens, it's one or the other.

E-arc is the latest take on this technology and allows uncompressed formats whereas the older standard ARC is limited to lower bitrate compressed formats.

Arc or EARC can be useful for internal apps and the tuner, TBH most apps are nowhere near uncompressed audio so ARC is generally sufficient.

Where EARC is really useful would be if you had for example a new console that supports newer features of HDMI 2.1 (for example 120Hz) but your amp doesn't, you'd connect the console directly to the TV and pass audio to the AVR back using ARC or EARC
 

moonslice

Novice Member
eARC allows you to hear sound from the TV's inbuilt tuners and smart apps (and any external devices connected directly to the TV) through your AV amp / surround sound system, provided your AV amp is also eARC-enabled. It's an alternative to using the TV's optical audio output and saves using that additional cable, plus had other benefits including support for more-advanced audio formats and the ability to control the amp's volume using the TV remote (via HDMI-CEC)

There's further explanation and a table of the differences between optical, ARC and eARC here.

Most TVs these days have at least one ARC or eARC-enabled HDMI port.
So if I'm using a universal remote (that controls my AV receiver then I probably don't need eARC?

If I'm watching my smart TV, the only signal being transferred through a hdmi cable is the audio ( from TV to the Receiver) so eARC isn't necessary. And If I'm watching something on my firestick (or DVR) then only the video signal is going from the Receiver to the TV, so eARC isn't necessary there either - right?
 

mikej

Well-known Member
If I'm watching my smart TV, the only signal being transferred through a hdmi cable is the audio ( from TV to the Receiver) so eARC isn't necessary.
What do you mean ? You'll need ARC or eARC in order to send audio from the TV to the AVR if you don't have an optical cable.
And If I'm watching something on my firestick (or DVR) then only the video signal is going from the Receiver to the TV, so eARC isn't necessary there either - right?
Yes, you don't need ARC or eARC for audio from any devices plugged directly into your AVR.
 

moonslice

Novice Member
Oh - so it's not just an issue of sending signal both directions at the same time. If I ever send audio TO the AVR (watching smart TV) - I need eARC - because at other times (through the same cable) I'm sending audio FROM the AVR (to the TV, like when I'm watching firestick). Is that right?
 

mikej

Well-known Member
Oh - so it's not just an issue of sending signal both directions at the same time.
As Jamie said above, you are either sending audio from the TV to the AVR (eg. when watching the TV's apps) or sending video from the AVR to the TV (eg. when watching your Firestick) - never both at the same time.
If I ever send audio TO the AVR (watching smart TV) - I need eARC - because at other times (through the same cable) I'm sending audio FROM the AVR (to the TV, like when I'm watching firestick). Is that right?
No - if you have your Firestick connected to the AVR, the AVR will receive audio directly from the device and only send video via HDMI to the TV. This is not making use of eARC.
 

MultiRoom

Well-known Member
I thought you needed earc/arc in order to lip sync effectively. If OP is considering using an HDMI input that doesn’t support this they risk having lip sync discrepancies.
 

ashenfie

Well-known Member
Never imho. I have the feature, I use Apple TV or uhd player for everything. If you wanted live tv via tuner the arc will do as tv sound is so crappy.
 

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