When will a coronavirus vaccine be ready ?

Mike K

Active Member
There‘s still a lot of vulnerable people in group 6 including adults with learning difficulties so I would vaccinate them before moving onto the police and teachers
 

Luminated67

Distinguished Member
There‘s still a lot of vulnerable people in group 6 including adults with learning difficulties so I would vaccinate them before moving onto the police and teachers
Agreed, I have a son it that category.
Police are in contact with quite a lot of people so I would say they are at greater risk.
The average police person will deal with maybe a couple of dozen or so people in a shift compared to thousands in a supermarket, I’m not saying one is more important than the other but in all honesty few jobs come into contact with more people in a day than a supermarket assistant.
 

Mike K

Active Member
If that’s the case then the police should have been in phase one, but a young adult with learning difficulties is 6 times more likely to die if they catch Covid 19 than a healthy person. Also any police officers with underlying health conditions would also be included under group 6

 

Mike K

Active Member
Agreed, I have a son it that category.

Agreed, I have a son it that category.

The average police person will deal with maybe a couple of dozen or so people in a shift compared to thousands in a supermarket, I’m not saying one is more important than the other but in all honesty few jobs come into contact with more people in a day than a supermarket assistant.
Me too. At the end of the day reducing deaths has to take priority above all else.
 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
Agreed, I have a son it that category.

The average police person will deal with maybe a couple of dozen or so people in a shift compared to thousands in a supermarket, I’m not saying one is more important than the other but in all honesty few jobs come into contact with more people in a day than a supermarket assistant.

Supermarket workers do need to be prioritised as well, it’s people like this who have kept the country running. But largely speaking (not always the case I know), most supermarket workers are sitting behind a screen, socially distanced in a large ventilated building, often now with restricted numbers of customers who can’t enter without a mask (unless exempt). If people kick off in the supermarket, they can usually retreat and call the police. Police on the other hand are having to constantly enter small properties full of people that have no regard for covid or your safety and don’t wear masks, get spat at (a lot of this), having to frequently get hands on with people, put them in their car and drive miles with them (again often without masks), enforce c19 legislation with people who have no respect for it, take DNA samples from people, search people, deal with them in custody, attend and deal with sudden deaths where c19 is a factor, administer breath tests (people literally blowing at you), provide first aid on a regular basis... the list goes on. They also have to enter the homes of very vulnerable people, and might carry it in.

I’m just saying it’s not the numbers of interactions you have as such, but also the types of interactions and who with. I just hope everyone with a public facing role gets in soon.
 
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richp007

Distinguished Member
If that’s the case then the police should have been in phase one, but a young adult with learning difficulties is 6 times more likely to die if they catch Covid 19 than a healthy person. Also any police officers with underlying health conditions would also be included under group 6


Yes they were lobbying for this last week. It is a difficult decision of course to decide on the priority order, but I do think those with learning difficulties should be at the very top now as well.
 

Luminated67

Distinguished Member
Supermarket workers do need to be prioritised as well, it’s people like this who have kept the country running. But largely speaking (not always the case I know), most supermarket workers are sitting behind a screen, socially distanced in a large ventilated building, often now with restricted numbers of customers who can’t enter without a mask (unless exempt). If people kick off in the supermarket, they can usually retreat and call the police. Police on the other hand are having to constantly enter small properties full of people that have no regard for covid or your safety and don’t wear masks, get spat at (a lot of this), having to frequently get hands on with people, put them in their car and drive miles with them (again often without masks), enforce c19 legislation with people who have no respect for it, take DNA samples from people, search people, deal with them in custody, attend and deal with sudden deaths where c19 is a factor, administer breath tests (people literally blowing at you), provide first aid on a regular basis... the list goes on. They also have to enter the homes of very vulnerable people, and might carry it in.

I’m just saying it’s not the numbers of interactions you have as such, but also the types of interactions and who with. I just hope everyone with a public facing role gets in soon.
Very true, in most extreme cases police are exposed to the threat of Covid more than most. We are an independent supermarket so whilst we still be quite a lot of staff 60 in total at any one time we will only have about 24 on, and whilst there are screens we have quite a few floating staff that are on the shop floor and shift on to tills when required. In my opinion the ones behind the screens are the safest and it’s the ones on the floor most at risk.

At the high of the first lockdown we the owners and the management staff took it on ourselves to man the doors knowing full well we would be putting ourselves at most risk and in the end I was the one who caught it in May and ended up giving it to the wife and son who was shielding, luckily none of us needed hospital but for several months the affects of Covid were ever present and even to this day the son is still got some side effects of it.
 

krish

Distinguished Member
I saw in some papers the story of the “cure” using a cancer drug in Israel and 30 persons in first trial. Seems no coverage at all on the big news sites
EXO-CD24, yep it's had a bit of coverage
- only just gone through that trial (at the Tel Aviv hospital where the drug was originally developed) with no control group

29 of the 30 patients with moderate to severe symptoms were released from hospital in 3-5 days; nothing divulged about the one remaining patient.
 

rulocal

Well-known Member
Interesting thread on AZ efficacy vs SA Variant.

 

starfarer

Well-known Member
Pfizer's vaccine new name - COMIRNATY. Tozinameran will be used as non commercial.

Zyesami phase 2b/3 preliminary result managed to reduce hospital stay by median of 5 days across all patients who're on high flow nasal canula HFNC, non invasive positive ventilation NIPPV and mechanical ventilation MV. These are severely ill patients with respiratory failures likely to progress HFNC -> NIPPV -> MV. For patients on HFNC (kept as long as possible to avoid ventilators & complications), they've reported 11 days fewer stay in hospital. Report says discharged so assuming they've recovered in less time compared to max standard of care with placebo.

One thing to note on this release is it's Zyesami + max standard of care SOC vs placebo + max SOC. Placebo is what is currently used to treat patients (no details yet on what's used) and it's not placebo meanings from vaccine trial. There's no difference in mortality within 28 days between those 2 groups. The treatment works as good as current treatment plan and 40% better in reducing hospital stay. We have vaccines which will keep people off hospitals and treatments like this will hopefully keep ICUs free.
 

krish

Distinguished Member
Pfizer's vaccine new name - COMIRNATY. Tozinameran will be used as non commercial.
Not sure it's caught on yet, most just go with the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid vaccine. There are only two I recall the brand names of, Janssen's ENSEMBLE and Russia's Sputnik V - the former only because I'm on the trial and its similarity to the name of a genomic database I'm familiar with (minus one letter), and the latter because of Putin's Cold War bravado. On the other hand, BioNTech's brand awareness has skyrocketed.
 

tapzilla2k

Distinguished Member
Yes they were lobbying for this last week. It is a difficult decision of course to decide on the priority order, but I do think those with learning difficulties should be at the very top now as well.

There's a lot of anxiety amongst Asthmatics at the moment, the Government appear to have decided to only vaccinate Asthmatics who either use oral steroids on a daily basis or those who don't have controlled Asthma in group 6. Punting other Asthmatics out of the 9 priority groups altogether by the looks of it. Asthma UK has been valiantly trying to get clarity on this but it seems the Government haven't decided where the goal posts stand with Asthma. All based on a few studies that indicate Asthmatics are less prone to severe disease, ignoring the other studies that seem to indicate Asthmatics are at higher risk of long COVID. I know the concentration is on reducing the risk of death through vaccinations, but that vital short term goal might bite us up the backside later on with long COVID.

The last time I had a bad cold it caused a secondary bacterial infection which necessitated oral steroids (it's fun taking 7 or 8 steroid tablets at the same time several times a day) and antibiotics. My asthma has been out of control ever since. I feel lucky not to have been hospitalised. I should be in group 6 due to severe mental illness and a few other things.

My fear is the Government are going to sacrifice certain groups to achieve the vaccination target and then move onto the police etc before going through the rest of the population.
 

mitchec1

Distinguished Member
I'm a little bit confused as to how teachers have suddenly become a priority to get the vaccine or shouting the loudest

Surely before teachers, it should be police, the fire service, armed forces and key worker identified as working in critical infrastructure.

The government has a list of critical services and companies have provided lists of jobs who they can't run without.

The likes of National Grid, Gas,Water, Councils, Railways the list goes on.

Keep the lights on, critical infrastructure running and more importantly look at keeping our emergency services as safe as possible long before teachers
 
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DJDave87

Active Member
Public services and teachers etc only make up a few million people at most, 3/4 days vaccinations. Group 6 is a much broader category and will be nearer 10 million and a longer, more sporadic roll out. I can imagine it easier sending vaccines to medics at barracks/police hq than it is to send out appointments to everyone shielding.

I suppose it depends on the vaccines ability to reduce transmission? If it does, squeeze in public services (likely spreaders), if it doesn’t the priority has to be the most vulnerable?

Is there not also potential for the second dose catch up to start taking away supply to first dosers? It seems to be a little under 500,000 a day atm? Not really increasing too much and they’re mainly first dose.
 

acatweasel

Well-known Member
You can drive yourself nuts trying to come up with the "right order" for the vaccine roll-out. Personally, I think I'd have gone for the fastest way to slow transmission. So I'd have innoculated "the spreaders" rather than the vulnerable, or maybe just gone for the fastest logistics.
No right answer to it.
The evidence is building on transmission reduction from the vaccines in general, and specifically on the maximising of the first dose. Looks like we have that about right. The longer you take to build immunity, the more likely a difficult variant is to arise.
 

starfarer

Well-known Member
All of those services are still operating without any big impact. School openings are the priority to most as the first step out of this lockdown. On other workplaces Adults are able to do their own risk assessments and at least will have understanding of regulations (mask wearing, distancing & isolate if showing symptoms).
 

rulocal

Well-known Member
Well if the EU don’t want them... good to see the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine being welcomed in Ghana today.



Indeed, great news to see Covax delivering on its promise.

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Lee

Moderator
Well if the EU don’t want them... good to see the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine being welcomed in Ghana today.
Just flicked France24 on and GPs in France can now give the vaccine. They had a GP on who went to the chemist to collect his one vial of the Oxford vaccine to give to people in the age range of 50 - 64 with health conditions. He is allowed one vial a week!
 

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