When will a coronavirus vaccine be ready ?

pcaddy

Well-known Member
I am one of the lucky ones I had my first vaccine dose yesterday, I'm waiting 12 weeks for the second dose now. :)
 

krish

Distinguished Member
Excellent interview with Prof Sarah Gilbert on Marr this morning. Very clear, informative and measured responses to current concerns. No sensationalism or scaremongering.

Interview @ ~32m:30s
 
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raduv1

Distinguished Member
Now there are swings and roundabouts to this roll out and reducing death rate being the main concern .

For folks that can not work from home and as it seems we are deemed non essential even though we have to go out to work .

One wonders If we are the forgotten ones that keeps the economy rolling whilst risking our lives in doing so .

Seems that factory work that has been found to be a major concern for infection rates is not enough to be vaccinated.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Even though I'm close to being next on the list, I'm happily sat at home ( just going out when absolutely necessary to pick up prescriptions, get medical tests etc) so I'd be happy to give up my place to teachers, retail staff, supermarket delivery drivers, factory workers etc.

Given that the vaccines do seem to reduce transmission, then now that the very most vulnerable have been covered we should perhaps be targeting the most likely spreaders next?
 

raduv1

Distinguished Member
Maybe factories workers should be somewhere in the priorities list.
I would put store workers above this as they not only have to deal with workmates but also the public.
 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
Maybe factories workers should be somewhere in the priorities list.

Good luck. They don’t even want to prioritise police officers.

But someone who is not likely to catch it because they are retired and safely at home get the jab. Doesn’t make much sense to me.
 

raduv1

Distinguished Member
Good luck. They don’t even want to prioritise police officers.

But someone who is not likely to catch it because they are retired and safely at home get the jab. Doesn’t make much sense to me.
Well it make sense in the largest percentage of deaths are in this group .

I'm not asking for the most vulnerable to be dismissed or forego vaccination .

I'm not really asking for anything apart from if the workplace is now the major concern for infection . Should it now be addressed ?
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Good luck. They don’t even want to prioritise police officers.

But someone who is not likely to catch it because they are retired and safely at home get the jab. Doesn’t make much sense to me.
Not necessarily safe, if they got it they were far more likely to be hospitalised and die. And many of them did. As I said, now the most vulnerable have been covered, I would support a case for you front line guys being next.
 

IronGiant

Moderator
Well it make sense in the largest percentage of deaths are in this group .

I'm not asking for the most vulnerable to be dismissed or forego vaccination .

I'm not really asking for anything apart from if the workplace is now the major concern for infection . Should it now be addressed ?
I would even if it means I miss out for a while, although I'm in a vulnerable group.
 

Tight Git

Distinguished Member
I see the South African variant as a major stumbling block in getting back to normal.

The manufacturers are talking about adapting their vaccines by autumn but that's over 6 months away.

The Kent variant spread across the UK in half that time, so where does that leave us?
 

Mevlock

Member
I see the South African variant as a major stumbling block in getting back to normal.

The manufacturers are talking about adapting their vaccines by autumn but that's over 6 months away.

The Kent variant spread across the UK in half that time, so where does that leave us?

The Kent variant quickly took over because it was more transmissible than the original.

As far as I know the South African variant is just the same as the Kent variant when it comes to how transmissible it is.

So I don't see any reason at all for it to become the dominant strain. Certainly not in a short time scale.

In fact if it doesn't have any advantages over the Kent variant (other than evading the Oxford vaccine) then it should take a long long time for it to spread. Not while we are still in lockdown and still in the middle of vaccinating the country anyway.

Eventually yes if it's vaccine resistant it would spread more but not right now.

At least this is just my limited understanding. I could be wrong.
 
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Mevlock

Member

Let hope it doesn’t take hold here.

What have the other vaccine manufacturers said about the SA variant?

I think I'm right in saying that both Pfizer and Moderna have seen just a small drop in efficiacy when it comes to the South African variant.

I'd still prefer to see a much more robust study. The current one seems very small and limited.

So I'm not overly panicking just yet.
 

gavinhanly

Distinguished Member
According to what I've read (on the BBC) the concern on AZ and the SA variant is that the limited efficacy is against moderate and mild versions of the disease - and that there's still a good chance that it prevents severe versions of COVID (i.e. those that require hospitalisation).

Is that the case? I would have thought that preventing hospitalisation was really the main concern here.
 

Philly112

Distinguished Member
According to what I've read (on the BBC) the concern on AZ and the SA variant is that the limited efficacy is against moderate and mild versions of the disease - and that there's still a good chance that it prevents severe versions of COVID (i.e. those that require hospitalisation).

Is that the case? I would have thought that preventing hospitalisation was really the main concern here.

The average age of the study was too low to know if it prevents hospitalisation, as very few of them would have required hospital even without vaccination. But the feeling appears to be that the vaccine should have a reasonable effect to prevent serious illness. But they really don't know.
 

Autopilot

Distinguished Member
According to what I've read (on the BBC) the concern on AZ and the SA variant is that the limited efficacy is against moderate and mild versions of the disease - and that there's still a good chance that it prevents severe versions of COVID (i.e. those that require hospitalisation).

Is that the case? I would have thought that preventing hospitalisation was really the main concern here.

I thought that. If it’s reduced to effectively a bad cold, then surely that would be sufficient. At least on an individual level.

However I guess it’s also about transmission. Even if you only have minor illness then your also going to be contagious. However if the vaccine is good enough to get your body to eliminate the virus, thus not develop into COVID-19, you are much less likely to spread it. And that’s ultimately what we need to end a pandemic, as otherwise it will just continue to circulate around the population, perhaps even more so if people see it as being less dangerous, with a risk of further mutations.

Pure speculation on my behalf of course, I’m sure others will have more to say about this :).
 
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Tight Git

Distinguished Member
So I'm not overly panicking just yet.

Neither am I, just a bit concerned but assured by your response, thank you.

Incidentally, the Government often tell us there's no need to panic, but would they ever tell us when there is a need to panic? !!!
 

dUnKle

Member
The lady on Andrew Marr and the description using the two pyramids I thought was very helpful and simple

deaths at the top, asymptotic cases at bottom, and how the vaccine will effect those pyramids, either chopping off the top almost completely or reducing the size of them dramatically

have to question why the media seem to be pushing this story so much
I saw in some papers the story of the “cure” using a cancer drug in Israel and 30 persons in first trial. Seems no coverage at all on the big news sites
 

Luminated67

Distinguished Member
Am I the only one that gets a bit p1ssed when you hear the debate on the news that teachers need to get the vaccine ahead of others, especially when the science suggests children don’t spread it as easily as adults. :mad:

I’m in the supermarket business and we have been working none stop throughout this whole pandemic with little to no advice or support and are coming into contact with thousands of the public on a daily basis, if it were to get into the staff then chances are it could go through a store in no time and potentially close the business for a period. I reckon the food supply chain business who have been at the front line of this really need to get this vaccine before the variants start to spread like wildfire.
 

Mevlock

Member
Am I the only one that gets a bit p1ssed when you hear the debate on the news that teachers need to get the vaccine ahead of others, especially when the science suggests children don’t spread it as easily as adults. :mad:

I’m in the supermarket business and we have been working none stop throughout this whole pandemic with little to no advice or support and are coming into contact with thousands of the public on a daily basis, if it were to get into the staff then chances are it could go through a store in no time and potentially close the business for a period. I reckon the food supply chain business who have been at the front line of this really need to get this vaccine before the variants start to spread like wildfire.
Once we hit phase two I'd put the police, teachers, and any shop workers first in line.

Anyone dealing with the lots of different people on a daily basis.

Children do still spread it.

The evidence is pretty flimsy showing that they don't to be honest. And what evidence there is only applies to very young primary school age kids.
 

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