When will a coronavirus vaccine be ready ?

SteveAWOL

Distinguished Member
A relief to see that those reports earlier this week of a single dose regimen being only 33% effective are proving to have been premature...



 

SteveAWOL

Distinguished Member
Dr Fauci says that Johnson & Johnson’s single dose vaccine should be approved by FDA within a fortnight...


With 100 million doses expected to be ready by April...


 

Lee

Moderator
Dr Fauci says that Johnson & Johnson’s single dose vaccine should be approved by FDA within a fortnight...

We'll approve it and then split it into 2 doses, 6 months apart :devil:
 

Lee

Moderator
Wife is going to the hospital tomorrow for her jab. Was pleasantly surprised to see that, as well as daytime slots, there were also appointment slots available throughout the night.
 

MrFraggle

Distinguished Member
I see cracks are appearing in the decision to have a 12 week gap between vaccine doses with the BMA and Dr's in Wales and Scotland calling for the gap to be lowered to 6 weeks. I have never been comfortable with the 12 week gap, I could never understand why the decision to increase the original 3 week gap to 12 weeks was made a couple of weeks after vaccinations began rather than before.
 

SteveAWOL

Distinguished Member
Hopefully there’s plenty of data being gathered as to efficacy rates between those who got 2nd dose after 21 days and those who are waiting longer, as seems to be plenty of debate amongst doctors...



 

dUnKle

Member
I get confused and have not fully kept up to date and rely on you guys to explain ways it easy to understand ways. It’s appreciated

as for the “delay”

is there a know risk to waiting longer for that second dose ?
Does it “wear” off and does a delay make a second shot not as viable

I’d love my parents to have both theirs (dad is early 70s, mum not quite 70)
Know of a number of people who have had the vaccine now and even 2 who have had second dose

guess my question is, if we keep “locking down” and trying to protect those that are vulnerable, is there a risk to waiting a few more weeks for the second dose ?
 

Mevlock

Member
is there a know risk to waiting longer for that second dose ?
Does it “wear” off and does a delay make a second shot not as viable

The shorter answer is: we don't know.

The longer answer is: hopefully not and to be honest everything we know about vaccines suggest that it shouldn't be a problem. The 3 weeks between the two shots was tested simply so they could get results as quickly as possible. Normally there is a longer delay between shots, often months. But doing that would have delayed the results by a lot longer.

It's basically an educated guess by the JVCI.

The greater concern is not the delay affecting the overall efficacy but having tens of millions walking around with just partial protection. There is some worry that it will force the emergence of variants resistant to vaccines. However the JVCI consider this a small possibility that is outweighed by the benefit of giving a much larger number of people some protection.
 
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SteveAWOL

Distinguished Member
I get confused and have not fully kept up to date and rely on you guys to explain ways it easy to understand ways. It’s appreciated

as for the “delay”

is there a know risk to waiting longer for that second dose ?
Does it “wear” off and does a delay make a second shot not as viable

I’d love my parents to have both theirs (dad is early 70s, mum not quite 70)
Know of a number of people who have had the vaccine now and even 2 who have had second dose

guess my question is, if we keep “locking down” and trying to protect those that are vulnerable, is there a risk to waiting a few more weeks for the second dose ?
FWIW, here’s what a prominent infectious disease professor (Dr van Tulleken) has to say...



Whilst the latest data from Israel is showing that immunity amongst elderly recipients of single dose improves from week 2 to week 3...

 

starfarer

Well-known Member
The shorter answer is: we don't know.

The longer answer is: hopefully not and to be honest everything we know about vaccines suggest that it shouldn't be a problem. The 3 weeks between the two shots was tested simply so they could get results as quickly as possible. Normally there is a longer delay between shots, often months. But doing that would have delayed the results by a lot longer.

This may not be true. Current vaccine target on Spike of Cov2 is showing more immunity towards on Th1 pathway rather than Th2 which resulted in failed challenge trials for SARS1. Within 3 weeks booster is to help for clonal expansion of Cytotoxic T cells (Th1 response). This could explain for more severe reaction on 2nd dose than on 1st. I don't have links for studies but I'm certain the booster dose research was going on since SARS1 or MERS.
 

gavinhanly

Distinguished Member
Note that the Moderna response is very specifically the two-dose approach - and it's aware that a third may even be needed to improve things further. Which makes our current one-dose for 12 weeks approach a little concerning.
 

starfarer

Well-known Member
Novavax UK & S Africa Trial Results

Few interesting data there. Not much change in efficacy with UK variant (8% less) but wow SA one not looking good (Note: CI range is very wide with small sample numbers there).
 

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
The first blood draw was two months after the first injection rather then the standard three months.
I go for the second draw on Wednesday which makes it four months.
As far as I know the trial still lasts twelve months but we will see.
Either way I will complete the trial.
 

starfarer

Well-known Member
you'll be unblinded if the trial manage to get 152 events.
 

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
I had no reaction to the injections so I suspect I got the placebo but will complete the trial.
If it is shortened then that is fine.
 

apolloa

Distinguished Member
Dr Fauci says that Johnson & Johnson’s single dose vaccine should be approved by FDA within a fortnight...


With 100 million doses expected to be ready by April...



Hopefully this and the AZ one can help third world countries, being that they can be transported and stored at fridge temperatures. Although the J&J one may be best in some areas as it’s a single dose.

Still stunned we have 5 vaccines in a year.
 

Trollslayer

Distinguished Member
This has dwarfed the Manhattan project by orders of magnitude.

I know we have seen the evil in some people with this but we have also seen many ordinary people who turn out to be extraordinary.
 

acatweasel

Well-known Member
This has dwarfed the Manhattan project by orders of magnitude.

I know we have seen the evil in some people with this but we have also seen many ordinary people who turn out to be extraordinary.
Colossal amount of work packed into a year or so. Fantastic effort.
 

SteveAWOL

Distinguished Member
Hopefully this and the AZ one can help third world countries, being that they can be transported and stored at fridge temperatures. Although the J&J one may be best in some areas as it’s a single dose.

Still stunned we have 5 vaccines in a year.

Main stumbling block now seems to be getting those vaccines manufactured in sufficient volume so that developing nations can get their fair share and don’t become breeding grounds for mutations; as current projections are that most of Asia and South America won’t be immunised until next year whilst Africa could be waiting until 2023 and beyond.


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