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What's the point of image processing?

Discussion in 'TVs' started by adaw, Nov 27, 2003.

  1. adaw

    adaw
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    Hi All,

    First of all great forum, great place to get information.

    I'm looking into getting a 32" widescreen TV.

    I'm a little confused about the image processing that new TVs seem to do (e.g pixel plus on phillips, etc)

    The amount of data from digital TV broadcasts (I've got sky+ and is brilliant) and DVD players is probably fixed. So what is the advantage of doubling the number of pixels and lines on the screen. There isn't any extra data which could be displayed, the extra data must be made up some how which seems to create 'artifacts' on the screen

    So maybe I should save some cash and get a standard TV which doesn't try to increase the resolution.

    But I'm probably missing something obvious, I'm new to all this. Any help?.

    Thanks

    Andy
     
  2. gbmitie

    gbmitie
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    andy

    tv's have become a pain but the bottom line must mean these GIMMICKS sell!

    All the cr==p u hear is supposed to improve pic quality but I have yet to see this in practice. A 50hz tv set up properly will knock spots of all these top of the range tv's BUT if u watch lots of DVD's then maybe these fancy dan sets will give an improvement.

    Image processing = gimmick = supposed to improve image.

    gbmitie
     
  3. Dimmy

    Dimmy
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    Adaw - I started a similar thread in the video processing forum.

    Basically, the purpose of Image Processing is to fool your eyes - as best a manufacturer can - into believing you're watching a perfect analogue source, and not a rough RF signal or blocky DVD or Sky Digital one.
     
  4. Pug72

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    I agree with the fact 50hz tv's without digital jiggery-pokery have a much sharper, natural looking screen.

    I recently bought a 36inch sony set, it was returned coz my 4 year old Grundig set had a much better picture.
     
  5. gbmitie

    gbmitie
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    thanks pug72:clap: :clap:

    gb--
     
  6. cerebros

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    So what 50Hz widescreen in 28 or 32" do you guys recommend then?
     
  7. fatbob

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    Hi Andy,

    While 50hz tv's can look fantastic with a good source, they do have a limitation, in that 50hz pictures tend to look pretty bad if expanded beyond 32" without some kind of processing.

    If you watch a non-anamorphic NTSC dvd in zoom mode on a 28" 50hz set, then you'll notice how bad the line structure is, so you can imagine how bad the same picture would look on a 50hz 36" or bigger set. Good processing, such as progressive scan will (when properly done) eliminate line structure on large images, and will also smooth out jagged edges on horizontal pans, generally making the image look more film like.

    On a 28" tv, processing isn't really required. On 32" sets, it's more a matter of taste, as most programming will still look good at 50hz, but you will also get the benefits of progressive scan, especially with NTSC. 36" or bigger is badly marred by line structure without some kind of processing, although some sets have badly implemented processing, so you wave goodbye to one set of problems, but say hello to a group of others (Pixel Plus springs to mind).

    Another point is that NTSC benefits more from processing than PAL does, so if you watch a lot of region 1 dvds, then it might be worth comparing 50hz sets to those with progressive scan or Sony's DRC, to see which you prefer.
     

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