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Whats the difference between RGB and component?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by Alexg, Mar 31, 2005.

  1. Alexg

    Alexg
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    Why do you have to use a converter box to convert RGB to component? what would happen if I used a scart cable with red, green, blue phono connections on the end of it and plugged it straight into my projector from my sky box?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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    You would get a very green picture......well actually you probably wouldn't get any picure as the sync is on composite from a scart output.

    RGB is RED, GREEN and BLUE images with sync on composite video

    YPrPb is Y= BLACK AND WHITE IMAGE with Pr and Pb being mathematical colour difference signals. The Y channel has the sync embedded in it. YPrPb is a lossless analogue compressed version of the RGB signal.

    Gordon
     
  3. Chris5

    Chris5
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    What I never understood was why straight (interlaced at normal frequency) component is supposed to be better than RGB.

    Is it because more development is done by the Americians with Component so producing better quality circuits? .....or is just that Scart is a very bad connector.


    by the way Gordon, how are those codes doing?
     
  4. Alexg

    Alexg
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    Many thanks for the reply, that clears that up :)

    So is the RGB input on the back of a computer monitor the same as a RGB output of say a skybox, if I was to use a scart to bnc leed and then use composite as the sync connections, would I get a picture?
     
  5. binbag

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    I think the answer to your question might include the answer 'Syncblaster'.

    But I'm guessing - what devices are you trying to connect and how far apart are they?
     
  6. StooMonster

    StooMonster
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    Sort of...

    Sky Digibox outputs RGBS (red, green, blue, sync)

    VGA computer monitor accepts RGBHV (red, green, blue, horizontal sync, vertical sync)

    'Syncblaster' splits RGBS into RGBHV.

    StooMonster
     
  7. Gordon @ Convergent AV

    Gordon @ Convergent AV
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    Chris: YPrPb is NOT supposed to be better than RGB. The confusion arises because the data on a DVD is digital component. The data being transmitted by freeview and sky digital is again digital component. The ideal solution from a video processing point of view is to undergo as few transformations as possible on teh way to the display.

    In the case of your DVD and Sky box...if you output as RGB the source has done a conversion from digital component to analogue RGB. The video processor will then convert the RGB back to digital component then possibly even down to (y/c)svideo...then it'll do it's tricks before going back to digital component then to RGB to drive the display. If it could stay at component either digital or analogue out of the source you'd be doing less processing....which is usually a good thing.

    Gordon
     

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