What's The Difference Between 'Normal' & 'Studio' Subwoofers? - Is This One Any Good?

Suave

Distinguished Member
Hello All,


I am a novice on understanding subwoofers so please forgive my ignorance. I have been trying to learn about them and it is not as simple as one would think! Any way, I really would like a very small compact sub (mainly for home cinema but also music from time to time) and would like it to be 'out of the way' as much as possible.

I have found one I quite like but it is a 'Studio' Sub. How and what is the difference then, between a Studio Sub and a normal one(s) that one would get from any shop and which are advertised. (Studio subs are not normally advertised or reviewed by Hifi/Av folks/press?). The one I saw would be quite good for my needs but I do not know if Studio subs 'work' in normal applications or if there are bad issues or they do not sound good when used in the home? (it says that it can work in the product details but I thought it best to check).

The details on the one I have seen are below (apologies for the very long info but I thought I best put all of it there so you can get all the full facts). If a Studio sub or this one will not work or is not advisable, does anyone know of something of similar size with good performance that is reasonably priced? Here are the details:

Regards,

Suave.

TAPCO SW10 SUBWOOFER

Sometimes, you just got to have more bass
Developed by the renowned Mackie studio monitor team, the SW10 Active Studio subwoofer destroys anything in its class—both in sound quality and looks. The huge sounding, yet compact TAPCO SW10 "mini-sub" offers devastatingly loud, punchy, and precise low-end down to 34 Hz—which is pretty damn low. It can be used in a variety of applications, including small project studios, surround sound editing, home theater playback, and desktop audio workstations. With its huge bass, full, powerful sound, and superior performance, the SW•10 is the perfect compact subwoofer to add necessary thump to a stereo or surround monitoring system made up of S5 and S8 desktop monitors.

Control

The SW10 Active Studio Subwoofer employs an acoustic suspension design for tight, articulate bass, which provides an amazingly flat and linear low-frequency response down to 34 Hz. In other words, it's tight and low. Variable input sensitivity lets you adjust the volume so it's just right for your system. The onboard Active crossover is a Linkwitz-Riley design—usually found in much higher end speakers—providing a low end range of 55 Hz to 110 Hz at 24 dB/octave. The individual crossover controls for the left and right channels provide additional flexibility in surround sound applications with a subwoofer output and bass management (LFE). Finally, there's a polarity reverse switch for optimizing the performance of the SW10 with the other speakers in your system.

I/O Low-down

The SW10 hooks up easily with any system. Left and right inputs are provided on both balanced XLR and unbalanced RCA connectors. The SW10 also offers dual high-Pass Outputs (also on XLR and RCA connectors) for connecting Active monitors like the S5s and S8s, or passive speakers through a separate power amplifier. The SW10's crossover splits off all of the bass frequencies from the incoming audio signals and sends the mids and highs to separate studio monitors. This way, the SW10 focuses on the boom, and the other speakers handle the rest for improved efficiency and overall clarity.
Protecting your investment

Accidents happen, so we added some dope circuitry just to keep your SW10 performing its best. The SW10 is tuned to maximize efficiency, but it can get hot if you run it loud for long periods. If the electronics get too hot, a thermal switch activates and shuts down the amplifier until it's cool again. A peak limiter circuit also monitors the amplifier output signal to guard against clipping and overloading the amplifier. This allows for loud punchy bass performance without distortion, and ensures long-term reliability.

FEATURES:

· Flat frequency response (±3 dB, 34 Hz to 110 Hz)
· 10" high-precision woofer with dual-voice coil
· 120-watt power amplifier
· High-strength cabinet constructed of 5/8" MDF composite
· High-density adiabatic fiberfill absorbs internal reflections
· Balanced XLR and unbalanced RCA input and high-pass output connectors
· Individual left and right 24 dB/octave Linkwitz-Riley crossovers, adjustable from 55 Hz to 110 Hz
· Rear panel power switch and AC voltage select
· Rear panel power switch and AC voltage select

SPECIFICATIONS: SW10

Acoustic Performance
Free Field Frequency Response: 34 Hz – 110 Hz (±3 dB)
Lower Cutoff Frequency: -3 dB @ 34 Hz
Upper Cutoff Frequency: -3 dB @ 110 Hz
Max SPL @ 1 meter, 7.5 dBu into both Balanced Inputs: 103 dB SPL @ 1m

Transducer
Low Frequency Driver: 10 in/254 mm woofer with steel frame,dual voice coil, and paper cone

Amplifiers
Rated Power: 120 watts rms into a 4 ohm load (60 watts rms x 2)
Burst Power: 270 watts rms into a 4 ohm load (135 watts rms x 2)
Slew Rate: > 15 V/µs
Distortion (THD, SMPTE IMD, DIM 100): < 0.03%
Signal-to-Noise Ratio:
> 110 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz, A-weighted, referenced to 60 watts into 4 ohms
Type: Monolithic IC, Class AB

Electronic Crossover
Crossover Type: 24 dB/octave Linkwitz-Riley
Crossover Frequency: Variable, 55 Hz to 110 Hz
Input Impedance: 20 k&#937;, balanced bridging; 10 k&#937; unbalanced

AC Power Requirements
US: 120 VAC, 60 Hz
Europe: 240 VAC, 50 Hz
Korea (AC Power Select at 230 V): 220 VAC, 60 Hz
Japan (AC Power Select at 115 V): 100 VAC, 50/60 Hz
AC Connector: 2-pin IEC 250 VAC, 16 A male
Fuse: 115 VAC: T 1.6 A/250 V, 230 VAC: T 800 mA/250 V
Power Consumption: 80 watts with music, loud mix 20 watts quiescent (idle)

Physical Dimensions and Weight
Enclosure: 0.625 in/16 mm thick MDF
Damping: Adiabatic fiberfill
Dimensions:
Height: 11.8 in/300 mm/12.3 in/312 mm (with feet) Width: 12.0 in/295 mm
Depth: 12.4 in/315 mm
Weight: 28 lb/12.7 kg
 

Ian J

Banned
Tapco is a brand name owned by Mackie who are well known in the professional marketplace.

The major difference between consumer models and professional ones is that studios aren't generally worried about the cosmetic appearance of the sub so the manufacturer doesn't have to spend loads of money making it's appearance fit for a living room and this can often result in a cheaper sub.

The bulk of what you have quoted is just marketing blurb which tells you absolutely nothing and whilst even the specs are fairly meaningless I would guess that it doesn't go particularly deep - but there again it's only £235
 

Crustyloafer

Distinguished Member
and precise low-end down to 34 Hz&#8212;which is pretty damn low

Yeah and so are my council tax bills.:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:........................................................Not.

My floorstanders go lower than that at -3dB. That's a joke.
 

Sniper

Active Member
This particular sub is aimed at ppl doing stereo mixes - if you look at the back you'll see there's a seperate input (and crossover) for the left & right channels so if you'de be using it for LFE work you'de have to use a splitter and connect both channels. Also - since this is more of a music mix sub, it's bass extention of around 30hz (given it's true) is more suited for music rather than movies.

For the money it doesn't look bad (IMO). You might want to consider looking at a BK XLS200, which, althou' I haven't heard personally, comes "highly" reccommened at a slightly higher price.
 

HiFiRuss71

Distinguished Member
The bulk of what you have quoted is just marketing blurb which tells you absolutely nothing and whilst even the specs are fairly meaningless I would guess that it doesn't go particularly deep - but there again it's only £235
Before a slight domestic disaster took place, I was thinking exactly the same.

Then I found it for £99. At that price, it would seem hard to critisise.

The actual specs don't seem too outrageous (although they're a bit vague) and with corner loading it may actually go a fair bit deeper than the specs suggest. I wouldn't expect too much on the distortion front, or expect it to be able to endanger your houses fabric though.

Russell
 
S

skinnyfat

Guest
There's good value to be found in the 'studio' market if you can over come the stigma attached to not buying a 'designed for HC' sub. Something like this http://www.soundz.co.za/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=MAHRS120 is great value, is endlessly adjustable (enough to keep any tweaker busy) and may just surprise you ITO output.
 

Attachments

  • HRS120_Rear.jpg
    HRS120_Rear.jpg
    95 KB · Views: 2,924

Tom3316

Active Member
arnt those mackie subs about 900 pound or close to.

like people have already said a good sub is a good sub regardless of if its a studio or home sub.

studio subs have more inputs making it easier to use with active moniters. having slave outputs and a variety of ins and outs.

for instence i have a monolith and im wanting to use it with my active moniters but the source only has outputs for left and right so im having to use y adapters to do what i want.

if a studio sub id just conect the outputs to the sub and then my moniters from the sub.

but a bad sub is a bad sub and a good sub is a good sub regardless if its a studio incarnation or home.

hope ive helped and not just waffled.

Tom
 

Tom3316

Active Member
oh and a lot of people say that tapco stuff is not verywell made etc as its mackies budget stuff.

Tom
 

Sniper

Active Member
There's good value to be found in the 'studio' market if you can over come the stigma attached to not buying a 'designed for HC' sub. Something like this http://www.soundz.co.za/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=MAHRS120 is great value, is endlessly adjustable (enough to keep any tweaker busy) and may just surprise you ITO output.

Indeed that's one monster sub (was actually considering one) - but at &#163;969 is a tad over the &#163;99 the other one costs! :smashin:

EDIT: actually for &#163;99 ... get two!
 

Suave

Distinguished Member
Hello All,

I am glad I asked for your help & opinions! I think I had better play it safe and get something that does not sound too good to be true (it does look very professional to me though!). What is a very good sub that is small and forward firing - I heard some Paradigms at a show a long time ago and thought they were great - I also thought of REL Q150? Is this a good one or is it too small to give real impact when watching movies etc?

Thank you all,

Suave!
 
S

skinnyfat

Guest
Hello All,
I also thought of REL Q150? Is this a good one or is it too small to give real impact when watching movies etc?

Thank you all,

Suave!

The BK mentioned earlier is best bang for buck in its price range IMO
 

The latest video from AVForums

Star Wars Andor, Woman King, more Star Trek 4K, Rings of Power & the latest TV, movies & 4K releases
Subscribe to our YouTube channel

Full fat HDMI teeshirts

Support AVForums with Patreon

Top Bottom