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What's the definition of a conservatory?

p1tse

Prominent Member
Keeping an eye on house market I've seen some houses with some nice conservatories, but some at first glance I thought they were single storey extension as only one side had windows, one even had a flat ceiling with flush lighting?

So curious what definition of conservatory are?
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Sounds like some of the 'conservatories' you have seen could be extensions built without planning permission.

Not sure how much risk there is once they are in place and passed onto a second owner, but in theory the council might be allowed to demand it is taken down.

Cheers,

Nigel
 

Vitalija

Prominent Member
Why anyone would want a conservatory is beyond me. My business reception is a conservatory and I hate it. Hot as hell in the summer and an ice box in the winter.
 

WeegyAVLover

Distinguished Member
Why anyone would want a conservatory is beyond me. My business reception is a conservatory and I hate it. Hot as hell in the summer and an ice box in the winter.

Agree always scorching during the summer and never used in the winter because of cold.

Although I seen a house renovation program a few years back and they built a conservatory-ish thing that was called a "garden room" (that could well be very wrong!) instead of a conservatory. I had glass on all 3 sides (the other side was attached to the house) and the roof was pitched & windowless except for an oval-like section in the middle (say a 1/4 of the size of the total roof) that rose up again and had windows all round that again.

Was much cooler in the summer but because they have heating in the room and insulation in roof space it was warmer in winter.
 

FZR400RRSP

Banned
nheather said:
Sounds like some of the 'conservatories' you have seen could be extensions built without planning permission.

Not sure how much risk there is once they are in place and passed onto a second owner, but in theory the council might be allowed to demand it is taken down.

Cheers,

Nigel

Why would the way they look lead you to think some of them have been built without permission?
A preference for a proper roof over a glass one is hardly a sign of 'dodgy dealings'.
 

MIghtyG

Prominent Member
Sounds like some of the 'conservatories' you have seen could be extensions built without planning permission.

Sounds to me like they are sun rooms rather than conservatories.

A home report should indicate if any work was done on the house by the previous owners and if anything has been done, they should be able to provide all the relevant documentation to prove its legal and above board.

Saying they are likely built without permission sounds a little 'jump to conclusion-y' :)
 

nheather

Distinguished Member
Why would the way they look lead you to think some of them have been built without permission?
A preference for a proper roof over a glass one is hardly a sign of 'dodgy dealings'.

Only because from the OP I thought the seller's were describing them as a conservatory.

If i was selling a house I would refer to it as a morning room or sun room rather than a conservatory as it adds more valuable.

If someone describes a morning\sun room as a cheaper conservatory it would cause me think why they had done that.

Cheers,

Nigel
 
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FZR400RRSP

Banned
WeegieAVLover said:
That is what I was thinking - they are called Sun rooms - much better than a conservatory.

I agree with that, if we ever go down this route it will be a sunroom with a proper roof.
 

ldoodle

Distinguished Member
From Wikipedia:

In the UK the legal definition of a conservatory is a building that has at least 50% of its side wall area glazed and at least 75% of its roof glazed with translucent materials, either polycarbonate sheeting or glass.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conservatory_(greenhouse)

In other words, a poor-mans extension :smashin: ****ing hate the things, with the utmost passion.
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
My inlaws are putting one in - predominently so they can sit in a decent amount light as the MIL is very poorly sighted now. It's going to run the with of most of the rear of the house from what I can tell and be 100% glass, except a couple of feet of wall at the bottom - they are paying a pretty penny - will be interested to see how it turns out.
 

nvingo

Distinguished Member
The legal definition is probably there only to clarify whether the extension room falls on the side of requiring planning permission.
 

Inked

Distinguished Member
We have just had one built with a full height solid wall on one side and dwarf walls on two sides. It does get warm if the sun is beating down but the roof and window blinds keep it bearable and opening the windows is enough to keep it cool. We removed the original external doors so that it is completely open to the kitchen as it is used as our dining room.

We have gone with underfloor heating so will see what it is like come winter as we haven't needed to put it on yet. We thought about an extension, but didn't feel the extra cost was worth it and that a conservatory would let more light in.
 

shoemaker666

Distinguished Member
my extension has french doors one side, window at the end and a window and door the other side. and it lets on loads of light in the summer but as the walls and roof are insulated its stays nice and warm in the winter. would rather have it than a conservatory can use it all year round
 

Dony

Distinguished Member
I was reading this thread earlier and agree about sunroom's being a better option than a conservatory. That's because I have one :D (so I would say that).
Anyway, I was in the garden taking some pictures and remembered about the thread so here's mine. Double's up well as a Chinese laundry. :thumbsup:

Sunroom.jpg
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
nice
 

imightbewrong

Distinguished Member
would you not want some nice bi-folding doors along the front though, to really open it up?
 

shoemaker666

Distinguished Member
yeah the french doors onto the patio are enough. it looks really nice better than a conservatory. really like the windows that go up into what usually would be the roof space really makes it stand out :thumbsup:
 

la gran siete

Distinguished Member
conservatories need have decent blinds on them otherwise the heat is overwhelming if facing south or west.Sun room with a proper roof would be better or an extension with nice bifold doors which let a lot of light in
 

Ian J

Banned
Agree always scorching during the summer and never used in the winter because of cold.

Not necessarily as it depends on which direction the house faces. Ours is great in the afternoons and evenings as the sun is round the front of the house and it's also pretty good in the mornings but will get hot at middday when the sun is out.

It's great at any time of the day in Winter too if the sun is out as it's warm but not scorching
 

Inked

Distinguished Member
Wore Nowt said:
Not necessarily as it depends on which direction the house faces. Ours is great in the afternoons and evenings as the sun is round the front of the house and it's also pretty good in the mornings but will get hot at middday when the sun is out.

It's great at any time of the day in Winter too if the sun is out as it's warm but not scorching

Sounds the same as ours, had blinds fitted to help with the heat and cut the glare down while keeping the room very light.
 

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