What's the best connection HDMI or Component or S-Video

Discussion in 'Blu-ray & DVD Players & Recorders' started by rpreston, Mar 7, 2006.

  1. rpreston

    rpreston
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    Hi... Can anyone help

    Since I've just started to upgrade my TV and DVD, I've been wondering about how best to connect them together so my question is:

    Is HMDI better than Component or S-VIDEO
    Is TOSLINK better than Coaxal...?

    I'm a little stumped. Can you please help...

     
  2. dgkp

    dgkp
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    It depends on your set up.

    HDMI should be best, but isn't always as it's quite new and thus not necessarily implemented correctly. It is relatively future proof though as HI-DEF will use it. HDMI is an all digital connection.

    Component is next. This will sometimes--on some systems--be better than HDMI; but they should be about equal. The reason why HDMI should be a bit better than component is that component has to convert digital to analogue and then back again, which can introduce errors.

    S-Video is pretty much obsolete now, and you shouldn't base your choice on it.

    Coaxial is better than toslink, I think.
     
  3. KraGorn

    KraGorn
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    Coax being better than optical is true but often the difference is marginal so don't let it be a 'deal breaker' for you, consider it as a minor 'positive' in a product.

    Note also that DVI into HDMI is fine, but not the other way round unless the receiver supports HDCP on its' DVI input.
     
  4. dontnomakeitup

    dontnomakeitup
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    HDMI uses 8 bit greyscale, component uses 10bit, so componet is better in this respect. Data loss with decent cable will be minimal and the data has to be converted to analoge at some point.

    HDMI is only regarded as being the best as Hollywood are pushing manuafctures to imply this as it is easier to protect their content (HDCP). I would alwaysd use YUV where possible.

    Coax digital is regarded as superior to optical but is more prone to interferance from nearby cables. If long runs or lot of other cables nearby, I would use optical. If short, uncongested runs I would use coax.
     
  5. neilmcl

    neilmcl
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    Actually HDMI can carry 8 bit RGB, 8, 10 & 12 bit YCbCr video signals.
     
  6. dontnomakeitup

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    Strickly speaking this is true. I should have put DVI is 8 bit rather than HDMI. 99% of all consumer HDMI equiped sources will only output DVI video protocol over HDMI - which will be 8 bit. Any device outputting component will be 10bit. Whilst HDMI can carry 10, 12, 14 bit YUV it would not be compatible with DVI display devices as much of the black info would be lost.

    Emphasises the point that all HDMI and all component connections are not all one and the same and it's aways best to use your own judgement to see which appears best to you.
     
  7. rpreston

    rpreston
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    Thanks for the help guys.
     
  8. Welwynnick

    Welwynnick
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    What! Where do you get that idea from? Are you talking about analogue or digital component? You can have component or RGB over HDMI, so it sounds like there is a bit of confusion here.

    For future reference, 10 bit video can be carried over DVI; HDMI cannot carry 14 bit YCbCr ( only 8, 10 or 12 as neilmcl said); and black info is not lost by any 8 bit receiver ( this is confusing dynamic range with depth of modulation, and the connection protocol would adapt itself to 8 bit anyway). Facts, not guesses, please!

    Well-implemented component or RGB connections can be comparable with DVI or HDMI, but the best option as dgkp says, will depend on which is implemented better in a particular system.

    Nick
     
  9. Ekko Star

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    Well my 989 is set to 12-bit via HDMI to a HS20 PJ. That makes the pallette of colours and gradations on display >64 billion. Pretty good in other words :)
     
  10. dontnomakeitup

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    Sorry, but thought as 99% of the info on here was absolute turd that I'd just post anything!

    Was trying to keep it simple but as you have gone into more depth than the first post required (something which all users on here seem to do to show how much they know - or don't know) I will post the facts - ALL of them:

    DVI is an 8 bit RGB signal. HDMI can be 8 bit RGB, or 8 bit, 10 bit, or 12 bit YCbCr - as said previosly 99% of consumer HDMI items will be 8 bit DVI. If you have a DVI source and DVI display, there will be no problem. If you have a DVI source and an HDMI display, again, no problem. If however, you have an HDMI source and a DVI display, the below-black video information may be lost in the translation. (This is due to a bug in the Silicon Image HDMI transmitter that occurs when converting YCbCr to RGB - this is used in many consumer HDMI products.)

    Even though source information (DVDs, HD) is all 8 bit color, if DSP is applied in 8 bit, such as in a video processor, rounding errors will toss out some of the data. On the other hand, if the data is 10 bit, such as with YCbCr, then the rounding errors don't occur. In fact, 14 - 16 bit is optimum for processing. Also, DVD data is YCbCr, and is converted to RGB in the player for the DVI output. RGB cannot represent all the data in YCbCr, and this is why the below-black information gets truncated.

    This means if you have a DVI display, and are buying a DVD player, you should probably get one that has a DVI output on it along with an HDMI output, as the DVI-DVI connection will give you the optimum picture. If you have a DVI source and an HDMI source, along with an HDMI display, then use an HDMI switcher and repeater rather than the DVI switcher and repeater. Use a DVI-HDMI converter cable between the DVI source and the HDMI switcher. Lastly, although DVI has better resolution and lower noise than component video, DVI can introduce posterization. Now to the main point - most DVD players have analogue component video outputs so taking all this into account it's well worth comparing this with the DVI image as it could be of a better make up and easier for your equipment to work with.;)
     
  11. neilmcl

    neilmcl
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    Where do you get this information from? - not saying you're wrong just not heard this before.

    So what, you don't actually want below-black information in the final image anyway. It's only helpful when calibrating displays to show where black should be.
     
  12. ahin4114

    ahin4114
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    Interesting point, but surely if you're using the DVD player as the source for the calibration test patterns, and the below black information is lost, then the point becomes relevant?
     
  13. neilmcl

    neilmcl
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    Most pluge patterns will still allow you to calibrate brightness level without having to see below black information. Knowing that usually the next black setting is 2% above video black you'd use this to set brightness slightly below this level.
     

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