1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Whats is 96khz?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers & Amplifiers' started by Jack the lad, Jun 16, 2005.

  1. Jack the lad

    Jack the lad
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    Messages:
    2,033
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Location:
    New Zealand was Nottingham
    Ratings:
    +86
    What is 96khz?

    I ask this because I have connexted my Pioneer 868 to my Pioneer AX5iS via i-link and in the manual it states:

    "Copy protected 96khz DVD-video discs can be heard through the i-link connection, but they will be down sampled to 48hz." :confused:

    Any help appreciated :)
     
  2. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    7,529
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Near London.
    Ratings:
    +208
    96kHz is the sampling frequency explained here.

    It basically represents the number of times an analogue sound was sampled per second (96000 as opposed to 48000). Naturally doubling the sampling frequency significantly increases the amount of data that needs to be transmitted and I assume that iLink doesn't have the bandwidth required to carry this higher resolution signal - hence it being downconverted before it's transmitted to your amp. :)
     
  3. ancientgeek

    ancientgeek
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    I may be wrong, but I think it is just a licensing issue. You can use optical for full resolution audio from such DVD-video disks. It's no big deal, just that they weren't permitted to send decoded 96KHz audio over i-Link, because it would enable bit-for-bit recovery of the full audio data by plugging th other end into a computer instead of an amp. Rather than having the sound "not work" if you've configured i-Link for it, they give you a downsampled version. If you're keen to get the full resolution, you will use optical/co-ax digitial instead, and have it decoded in the amp.

    i-Link has 20 times the bandwidth required for 96KHz 24 bit uncompressed surround sound, so it's not that.
     
  4. Reiner

    Reiner
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2000
    Messages:
    3,315
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    61
    Location:
    Germany
    Ratings:
    +13
    Optical or coaxial are also digitial and thus would allow a 1:1: recovery, so it wouldn't make sense to restrict it on the i-Link connection and not on the optical/coaxial one.
    However it is correct that copyright issues are the reason for the restriction (downsampling) imposed.

    If the restriction is imposed depends on the make/model, i.e. some players do output 96kHz digitally.
     
  5. Jack the lad

    Jack the lad
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    Messages:
    2,033
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Location:
    New Zealand was Nottingham
    Ratings:
    +86
    Cheers guys.

    I also have the amp and DVD player connected via coaxial so am covered.

    Is there many discs out there that are 96khz encoded then?

    I have had a look at a few of mine but am none the wiser.
     
  6. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    7,529
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Near London.
    Ratings:
    +208
    There are a few - look out for DTS 96/24 which are sampled at 96kHz. I think the catalogue consists of the Queen back-catalogue and that's about it though. :)
     
  7. ancientgeek

    ancientgeek
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Well of course you can't restrict it on optical/coax, as that would preclude the use of an AV processor/amp. But I presume the available i-Link format is fully decoded standard firewire audio, so no special software is needed to capture it, whereas the optical/coax audio is still encoded, and requires a DTS decoder to convert it to generic digital audio data, so capturing the optical/coax is no different to stripping the audio stream directly off the DVD.
     
  8. Reiner

    Reiner
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2000
    Messages:
    3,315
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    61
    Location:
    Germany
    Ratings:
    +13
    Sure it can be restricted on optical / coax, too - my Yamaha DVD player does so. It would preculde the use of an AV processor/amp but then the player can decode the 96kHz internally.

    96kHz audio on DVD-video (which jack daws asked about) is not DTS, it's PCM. Such titles are pretty rare however.
    There are DTS titles with 96kHz, too, but it's an entirely different format.
     
  9. Jack the lad

    Jack the lad
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2003
    Messages:
    2,033
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    51
    Location:
    New Zealand was Nottingham
    Ratings:
    +86
    So in a nustshell, Im not likely to miss anything? :)
     
  10. eviljohn2

    eviljohn2
    Well-known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    7,529
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    86
    Location:
    Near London.
    Ratings:
    +208
    Not really, as with HDCD although it will technically sound better on the right equipment I think it's a better guide that some care has gone into the mastering and recording processes. :)
     

Share This Page

Loading...