1. Join Now

    AVForums.com uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

What's inside Cinemateq?

Discussion in 'Projectors, Screens & Video Processors' started by cybersoga, Jul 27, 2004.

  1. cybersoga

    cybersoga
    Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2002
    Messages:
    1,628
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Location:
    UK
    Ratings:
    +25
    What inside Cinemateq, in particular what deinterlacer does it use?
     
  2. simoncope

    simoncope
    Guest

    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Don't know, but don't you think it's odd that they can't handle a progressively scanned input?
     
  3. Liam @ Prog AV

    Liam @ Prog AV
    Well-known Member AVForums Sponsor

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2002
    Messages:
    8,498
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    136
    Location:
    Kent
    Ratings:
    +827
    I spoke to Cinemateq about this when it was first launched in the UK. The official line is Cinemateq are not gonna tell anyone what processor they use, end of story! I figure Trident or SIL, possibly with their own additions. What I did get is that Cinemateq reckon it's the best deinterlacing chip for movies and provides save function up to 150MHz pixelclock (I'm not gonna pretend to know what that means).

    When questioned on scaling PS or HD they simply said why would you wanna do that!! If it's from a DVD stick it into interlaced mode since the Cinemteq is gonna be better at processing, if it's 720 or 1080 running from HDTV then use the pass thru function since that's what it's there for and displays should scale that as well as a scaler could! Interesting.... there will be a Pro version of some sort when HDTV is launched which will likely try to compete with the Lumagen ProHDP by offering HD scaling. Can't see it competing really but time will tell I guess.

    My stance on it is specific implementations will require different scalers to do the job. If you want the top functions (HD processing, interlaced HDMI compatiblilty, videophile build quality) get a Lumagen HDP or wonder into Crystalio territory. If you're not big money processing then run an iScan if you want audio switching as well as video. Or go for the Cinemateq if you like a simpler product or the high number of inputs. It has quite a comprehensive support base for less advanced users, is a shiny silver box with cool blue on black LCD, and can switch a pile of sources accross up to three displays.
     
  4. oferlaor

    oferlaor
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2004
    Messages:
    10
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Ratings:
    +0
    from what I gather, it's their own brand of deinterlacer. The algorithms for this are quie well known and there are also several other manufacturers (e.g., Zoran) that have pretty decent deinterlacers now, so who knows...
     
  5. garmtz

    garmtz
    Standard Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2002
    Messages:
    305
    Products Owned:
    0
    Products Wanted:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    Location:
    Netherlands
    Ratings:
    +1
    Cinemateq has been Cinematrix in the past, so it probably takes the technology from the PSM-1 in an external scaler.
     

Share This Page

Loading...