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What's best practice for connecting 2 active subs to 1 output?

joffy1780

Established Member
There are 2 options toward the bottom of this page.One is the same as what you suggest,only more expensive,and the other would only work if your subs are on top of each other or very close.I would suspect the ones from my link would be of good quality,but I'm sure someone else will suggest a more expensive one from QED or the likes :rolleyes: .
 

Anfield

Established Member
Thanks for the input, joffy. :smashin:

I guess it comes down to a Y-splitter, or a Y-cable then.

Funnily enough my cables to the subs are Canare LV-77S, which would suggest the splitter route.

Surprised there aren't others with an x.2 setup. :thumbsdow


;)
 

asdonk

Established Member
I will be using 2 MJ reference 1 subs on the LFE connected with a splitter
this is to get a better bass in my room because of its size
the room is about 13 m x 5 m, I had the the choice between 1 big sub or 2 smaller subs
I have already done some listening with 1 Rel Stadium II, which is now connected with a neutrik cable for stereo use
the LFE signal is now at the moment connected to Rel storm 1 but is not capable to fill the room with enouth bass

playing with 2 subs should give a boost off 3 db in bass
 

Nimby

Distinguished Member
asdonk said:
I will be using 2 MJ reference 1 subs on the LFE connected with a splitter
this is to get a better bass in my room because of its size
the room is about 13 m x 5 m, I had the the choice between 1 big sub or 2 smaller subs
I have already done some listening with 1 Rel Stadium II, which is now connected with a neutrik cable for stereo use
the LFE signal is now at the moment connected to Rel storm 1 but is not capable to fill the room with enouth bass

playing with 2 subs should give a boost off 3 db in bass

Or 6 dB if you place them close enough together.
 

Neil Davidson

Prominent Member
AVForums Sponsor
The main advantage of the two subs would be the ability to position them properly to smooth out the frequency response in your large room. You are right to look for subs with real power to shift the required amount of air though!

Y splitters work fine but there is no point buying rubbish if you have already invested in good quality cables. A system will only be as good as it's weakest point.

Neil
 

Nimby

Distinguished Member
ceenhad said:
Y splitters work fine but there is no point buying rubbish if you have already invested in good quality cables. A system will only be as good as it's weakest point.

Neil

Woah there! Do you meant to tell me a solid splitter behaves differently from a cheapo Y splitter cable (or anything else) in the context of a low-level subwoofer feed? :)
 

Neil Davidson

Prominent Member
AVForums Sponsor
It shouldn't make a difference but I have seen some total rubbish out there. Flimsy and badly fitting sockets in particular.

If people want to go to the lengths of purchasing Canare cables (presumably terminated in 75 ohm Canare terminals a la Mark Grant) it doesn't seem to make sense to save tenner to avoid buying a Y cable made to a similar standard.

Now as to whether this makes an audible difference - I haven't 'scoped the signals to check for electrical difference and so far I haven't measured a noticable signal loss or frequency response change I could attribute to the splitter alone.

Neil
 

joffy1780

Established Member
I think the OP has lost interest in this,but I would say that BlueJeans seem to use quality materials (Canare,Belden) and are cheaper than Mark Grant for the same products,and I wouldn't recommend spending any more.
 

Anfield

Established Member
No, no! Haven't lost interest at all; some very interesting and informative posts here.

I'd like to get the best quality splitter I can, though I doubt it'll make a difference compared with the cheapo one. I read somewhere on this forum that Black Rhodium supply a splitter just like the one in my original post. Couldn't find a picture of the BlueJeans one.

Hell, I might even go the extra mile and spend the additional 85 pence and compare them both. ;)

BTW - my subs are Anthony Gallo MPS-150s and my room size is 6.7 x 5.2m.
 

joffy1780

Established Member
Anfield said:
Hell, I might even go the extra mile and spend the additional 85 pence and compare them both. ;)
You have more money than sense :rolleyes: :D .
 

eviljohn2

Prominent Member
ceenhad said:
Now as to whether this makes an audible difference - I haven't 'scoped the signals to check for electrical difference and so far I haven't measured a noticable signal loss or frequency response change I could attribute to the splitter alone.

Neil
I havn't noticed any response problems using a splitter but I do get an impedence mismatch between my subs which causes one to click when not in use (and probably whilst it's in use. :rolleyes: )

I've used a splitter which goes into both channels of my BFD so that my subs see the correct impedence. Not relevant to the OP in this case but I guess what I'm saying is that the best way of splitting audio signals is with some kind of active distributor although a simple Y-connection is functional too. :)
 

AleXsr700

Established Member
Why do you guys want to use splitters? Surely every sub nowadays has outputs.

I know the MJ Ref1s do, because I own a pair and I have one feeding the other. One QED subwoofer cable into sub A and then out of Sub A into sub B via another QED subwoofer cable.

By the way, I'm not sure why you would want to gain 3dB with two subwoofers. You will calibrate it to match the rest of the system anyway. So in the end you will be using two subwoofers and turn them both down a bit to end up with the same amount of bass.
All you gain is a better response in your room. A slightly more even bass spread.
 

Nimby

Distinguished Member
damenace said:
By the way, I'm not sure why you would want to gain 3dB with two subwoofers. You will calibrate it to match the rest of the system anyway. So in the end you will be using two subwoofers and turn them both down a bit to end up with the same amount of bass.
All you gain is a better response in your room. A slightly more even bass spread.

The theory goes that if you can gain ~6dB by placing two subs together then neither has to work so hard. The pair will provide lower distortion and higher dynamic peaks after turning them both down to match the speakers.

Seperating two subs widely in the same room will offer ~3dB extra with rather less to gain from the exercise.

Gaining 3dB by connecting two phono cables (one to each input socket of a sub) gains nothing. Since you must turn the sub down to match the speakers. With no compensating advantage in lowered distortion or increased dynamic range.
 

AleXsr700

Established Member
Didn't understand the last bit about the phono cables. Are you talking "bi-amping/wiring"? If so, I wasn't.

In the end, yes, we agree, that all you gain is less work for the individual subwoofer. However, usually this can be ignored as the subwoofers should be chosen according to the room anyway and hence should not really struglle at any volume. At least none that won't damage your ears.

Spreading the subwoofers in the room however will give a better room response, so I would prefer to spread them and fill the room more evenly.
 

AleXsr700

Established Member
Nimby said:
You haven't heard of stacking? (or co-location as our American cousins call it)
Me? No. I know that "to stack" means putting them on top of each other. But not as a hifi term, no.
 

Nimby

Distinguished Member
Stacking subwoofers increases the performance considerably. The more you add the more overall power and the lower the distortion. Several good subs stacked together will outperform almost any single top quality sub. Stacking can mean the subs are arranged horizontally as well as vertically. Or both.

Seperating subwoofers in a room may help the response. Or it may not. They will all be competing with each other. Cancellation and reinforcement are almost inevitable. Certain geometric arrangements involving several subwoofer are supposed to be beneficial.
 

AleXsr700

Established Member
Has anybody actually ever played around with the phase settings?

Still don't know why there is always a poti to regulate the phase if you only need 0°,90° and 180°. Why be able to select phases in between.

And is 90° always right for downfiring subs? It should be, theoretically, but for some reason they still have 0° and 180° available as settings. Why?
 

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