What is the scope of DLNA on Panasonic recorders?

Timk

Standard Member
Hope I'm on the right forum:rolleyes:

After years with my trusty DMR-E100H (yes, they really did exist!), I've come into a little money and have decided to upgrade. I'm also buying my first HD TV.

I'm Looking at a Panasonic combination, to include a blue ray recorder. I've been catching up with recent developments and have discovered DLNA. I take it that, amongst other things, this would give me internet access, either through the TV or the Recorder, or both, to things like Youtube, LoveFilm and iPlayer. My question is whether it will also allow me to view movies downloaded to my computer from sites like BlinkBox.

More generally, I'm having trouble conceptualising how DLNA would work with my computer. How do I get access to it and exactly what kind of access do it get? Can I get access to all files on it, or only to certain ones, and how do I know which? How do I control what is happening on my computer using only a remote control with no keyboard.

I'm having trouble formulating the question properly, because there's a sort of black hole in my knowledge and understanding between what I can do with a TV and Recorder and what I do on my computer. Hopefully, someone out there has had this black hole themselves, or knows someone else who has, and can help me fill it in.

thanks

Tim
 

Timk

Standard Member
Thanks. That's very helpful. Light is beginning to dawn. I didn't mention it in the last post, but I have a Mac and run Windows virtually. Services like BlinkBox don't download to Mac, so it looks as if I could usefully use Mezzmo for Windows downloads. Any idea what I should use for the Mac?

Tim
 

Gavtech

Administrator
Beware of the Panasonic implementation of DLNA.

So crippled as to be near useless.

The unit can only act as a DNLA server - not a client... and probably to only very current Panasonic equipment that supports DLNA in a client role.
 

Gavtech

Administrator
Beware of the Panasonic implementation of DLNA.

So crippled as to be near useless.

The unit can only act as a DNLA server - not a client... and probably to only very current Panasonic equipment that supports DLNA in a client role.


All it allows you to do is play video or pictures [ not music ] that are on the hard drive of the BDR... and only on Panasonic compatible equipment.
Nothing the other way.

No doubt future machines will have better implementation but this bare minimum makes the claim of DLNA capable as somewhat of a liberty
 

Timk

Standard Member
I think I get it. So I couldn't, for instance, transfer a movie from my computer on to the BDR for subsequent viewing, but I could, still, presumably, stream it directly from the computer to my new Panasonic TV (when I get it!). If I've got that right, then whatever other virtues the BDR might have, it would be completely irrelevant in enabling me to stream stuff from my computer to the TV. Is that right?

Any other BDRs do better than Panasonic on this?

Tim
 

Gavtech

Administrator
I think I get it. So I couldn't, for instance, transfer a movie from my computer on to the BDR for subsequent viewing,

No. Its play only , not transfer, and only files that are on the BDR played on a suitable client. i.e. the BDR will only act as a DLNA server to a client it 'likes'.
but I could, still, presumably, stream it directly from the computer to my new Panasonic TV (when I get it!).

I don't know the answer to that - It would require checking the detail of the actual model. [ Model number?] .. and what its limitations are.

When it comes to restrictive issues like this you can assume nothing with Panasonic - Every model must be checked. It is easy to make the mistake of thinking because one device may have a facility - they all will.
If I've got that right, then whatever other virtues the BDR might have, it would be completely irrelevant in enabling me to stream stuff from my computer to the TV. Is that right?

I think that is right.
Any other BDRs do better than Panasonic on this?

There are no other BDR's ... so for the present we are stuck with these limitations.
I am not expecting others to be much better, when they arrive.
 

spinaltap

Distinguished Member
Thanks. That's very helpful. Light is beginning to dawn. I didn't mention it in the last post, but I have a Mac... Any idea what I should use for the Mac?

As a fellow Mac user, here's what I have...

Panasonic plasma hooked-up via HDMI to my Yamaha AVR. My Mac Mini is connected to my AVR by HDMI (video) and toslink (audio). I utilise PLEX software on my Mac Mini to access my video library from my Netgear ReadyNAS (DNLA capable, BTW). Movies are ripped to the ReadyNAS via the Mac Mini's disc drive via RipIt software. I have a Harmony remote and Logitech DiNovo Mini (controller/keyboard) to handle everything.

Thus, you can access iTunes for movie and television programme rentals and purchases. You can also access FrontRow for movie trailers.

I can also access BBC iPlayer, iTV Player, 4oD, Demand5, Sky Player, BlinkBox, SeeSaw, and, Tv.com for example.
 

Timk

Standard Member
Thanks. That's very helpful. A few questions:

1) It looks like your set up doesn't involve any other computer at all, just the Mac mini which is dedicated for the purpose. So you would download movies etc. or rip from disks directly to the Mac mini. Is that right?

2) I presume your NAS is connected to your whole network. Is it an ethernet connection? Would it work just as well to have USB hard drive connected to the Mac mini (I happen to have a couple of those lying around)?

3) This is probably a naive question, but I take it that you access all those internet services you mention (iPlayer, 4oD, Blinkbox etc.) through an ordinary web browser running on the Mac mini (presumably Safari). Is that right?

4) Finally, do you ever have any problem with synchronising sound and picture when getting them from two different sources? I've had occasional problems with this.

Many thanks


Tim
 

spinaltap

Distinguished Member
A Netgear GS608 Ethernet hub is the centre of my system (£30). Attached to it is my Netgear ReadyNAS Duo. The cost of hard drives has plummeted in the 18 months of ownership, so 2x2Tb mirrored drives is the way to go. Also attached to the GS608 is my Mac Mini, Yamaha AVR and Squeezebox (for internet radio and music library).

If I were to buy again, I would purchase the recently released Netgear ReadyNAS Ultra (with either four or six bays, and Intel processor for better performance).

So, an uncompressed movie is ripped with RipIt software on the Mac Mini's internal SuperDrive. The ReadyNAS has iTunes Server on-board straight out of the box, so ripped movies are deposited there. Similarly, music is also ripped to iTunes Server on the ReadyNAS (music rather than video's folder).

The ReadyNAS is also Time Machine compliant out of the box.

I use the freely downloadable PLEX media server software on my Mac Mini. If funds permitted I would use an iPod Touch to control the lot. The Harmony remote and DiNovo Mini I have suffice meantime. Apple's FrontRow on the Mac is great for watching movie trailers, while accessing iTunes open's-up film and television programme rental and purchase.

I suggest any spare USB drives are used elsewhere - either for Mac data storage - or as a storage drive for something like the Humax Freeview+HD receiver (to record television programmes on).

You are correct; I view all the television catch-up services via the Safari web browser without issue.

I can't say that I have experienced the kind of synchronisation problems that you describe.
 
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Timk

Standard Member
Thanks again. i appreciate your taking the time to expand on this. I've got a couple more questions, if you don't mind:

1) I take it that the Netgear GS608 is what I know as a router. I have a Belkin router which seems adequate for my present needs. Does the GS608 have any distinct advantages. The promo material I've seen claims that it is very fast and specialises in transferring large file across the network. Is this right, or is it just sales talk, i.e. would I gain significantly from spending the extra £40 on it and dumping my Belkin - which is a few years old now?

2) I was surprised to read that your AV amp is connected to the GS608. It is also clearly connected to the Mac mini and the TV, so what is gained by connecting it to the GS608? I presume the amp must have an ethernet socket. I'm away from home at the moment, so I can't check if my 4 year old Pioneer AV amp has one.

Thanks again :smashin:

Tim
 

spinaltap

Distinguished Member
The GS608 is definitely NOT a router. It is an ethernet hub - eight sources shared amongst each other. Think of it as the equivalent of an electrical eight way adaptor.

My Netgear DG834N router resides upstairs with my main Mac Mini Server system while my AV (second) Mac Mini is downstairs in the lounge. This router presently transmits to the Mini, AVR and Squeezebox downstairs.

The Yamaha AVR is connected to the ethernet hub because it has v.Tuner derived internet radio on board - but the Squeezebox is far superior.

I am waiting on Netgear to launch their 500Gb capable PowerLine adaptors before moving away from wireless transmission through the house (which will, in my view, improve on video quality from catch-up services (and I will also buy the Netgear gigabit router).

BTW, in PLEX, BBC iPlayer and 4oD is integral to the media centre - with a more expansive range of programmes being available.
 

Timk

Standard Member
Ah, that's interesting. So, do I take it that you have a wireless signal from your router upstairs to the hub downstairs, to which are connected the AV dedicated Mac mini, the AV amp and the Squeezebox? If, so I think I've got the picture now.

I've got a flat, so I can run an ethernet cable easily enough from my study where the main computer is to the lounge. I imagine that this remains the best choice. I don't suppose the Powerline adaptors will improve on that, will they?

This has been very helpful for me; it has transformed a shadowy and a vague picture of what is necessary and possible into something much more concrete. Ta.

Tim :)
 

spinaltap

Distinguished Member
In your circumstances, go for 200Gb Netgear PowerLine adaptors (the Belkin equivalents reportedly are not as reliable).

Presently, my Squeezebox acts as a wireless bridge (although I do have an Airport Express, should I need it), plus the wireless capability of my second Mac Mini in the lounge.

Should you opt for buying a Humax FreeviewHD receiver in future, the PowerLine adaptors will provide flexibility in accessing catch-up TV services.
 

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