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what is the correct zoom mode when watchin dvds?

Discussion in 'TVs' started by goonie007, Mar 12, 2002.

  1. goonie007

    goonie007
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    i have the jvc av28wft1 widescreen tv and when i hooked up the dvd player watching gladiator and gone in 60 secs region 2 the tv auto switched to the zoom mode full and there was huge black bars top n bottom is this correct for these films as the whole reason i got widescreen was to watch them in fullscreen id of stuck with my 4.3 tv if i knew it was gonna be like this.
     
  2. mjn

    mjn
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    ok , here we go again :)

    if a movie is 2.35:1 ratio, then there will still be black bars at the top and bottom of the screen.

    BUT you shouldn't be using any Zoom function, as this degrades quality somethign rotten!!
     
  3. graham.myers

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    "Widescreen TV" is a compromise. You normally have two modes on a telly; 14:9 and 16:9.

    14:9 works for most terrestrial channels that broadcast thier version of wide screen. Expect to see black bars down the side of the picture rather than above and below. This is equivalent to 1.55:1 aspect ratio

    16:9 is for satellite widescreen presentations and is equivalent to 1.77:1 aspect ratio.

    A lot of films are film are in what used to be called cinemascope. This is 2.35:1. Some films use a 1.85:1 aspect ration. Also films such as Disney cartoons, Back to the Future use an aspect ratio of 1.33:1

    A widescreen TV can't hope to support all these formats so a compromise was made. Only full widescreen (2.35:1) will produce siginicate bars above and below, most others will be covered to some extent by the two formats on your TV.

    Don't even start on anamorphic presentations :)
     
  4. goonie007

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    gladiator is 1.35 anamorphic
    gone 60 secs is 2.35

    seems most films are in this 2.35 format good job i didnt buy a 24inch widescreen or id of been watchin a 30cm ruler size pic

    16.9 zoom filled the screen but as u said it degrades quality badly

    i wonder how many peeps would have snubbed buying a widescreen tv if they knew before hand that alot of films wont fill the screen on default a bloody lot
     
  5. LV426

    LV426
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    But, surely, a widescreen TV (used properly) will have much SMALLER black bars than, with the same film, on a 4x3 TV. Like many others, I prefer to see the WHOLE film, as it was shown in Cinemas, rather than to have the left and right edges cropped off just so it fills the height of the screen. That's what Home Cinema is all about.

    Of course, if you could buy a Cinemascope (2.35:1) TV then there wouldn't be any black bars top & bottom. They'd be at the left and right (on 1.85:1 and 1.33:1 material).

    Of course, if all film makers made their films the same shape...... let's not go there; life would be dull, wouldn't it?
     
  6. Kevo

    Kevo
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    I've hardly seen any 14:9 programmes, 16:9 is used by most digi terrestrial broadcasters and not just satellite isn't it?

    I never knew BTTF was shot in 1.33:1, how dissapointing :(
     
  7. graham.myers

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    I'm sure bttf was 1.33:1 or at least thats what I remember on the LDs. I've just sold them so can't check.

    If you watch BBC1 through and arial, not $ky (not sure about ITV digital) then you'll get a picture that is 14:9. If you watch BBC1 on $ky it'll be 16:9

    Or at least thats what appears on my telly.
     
  8. Kevo

    Kevo
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    It's definatley 16:9 on Digital Cable TV.

    I'll investigate BTTF aspect ratio and let you know.

    Find it hard to believe it wasn't shot in WS.
    Maybe you have the full frame version, if it's shot in 1.85:1 open matte.
     
  9. goonie007

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    ok so what aspect ratio in the future are films gonna be shown in at the moment most dvds i see are in 2.35:1 so why arnt there tvs that are designed to accomodate this format as the norm and the others play second fiddle?and not the other way round? :confused:
     
  10. CWB

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    BTTF's intended viewing ratio was 1.85:1, so that LD version must have been pan and scam or open matte version.
     
  11. Kevo

    Kevo
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    goonie

    16:9 is a good compromise.
    Also, there are technical restraints with WS tube technology to take into account.
     
  12. Doubledoom

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    Because, as already has been said, the 16:9 ratio is a compromise ratio.

    Traditional television/Academy ratio is 4:3
    Cinematic films tend to have a whole range of ratios but the most common are 1.85:1 and 2.35:1.

    If televisions were 2.35:1, could you imagine how small the 4:3 image would look on a 2.35:1 ratio tv?

    The 16:9 is an ideal compromise. In the future you are more likely to see 2.35:1 films increase or perhaps go even wider to compete with widescreen televisions and home cinema set-ups.
     
  13. DavidT

    DavidT
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    I'm with you goonie, if I had known that a widescreen TV was still going to have black bars at the top and bottom I might have not bothered to buy one. Trouble is that now I have bought one its too late.

    Funny how you can have a 4:3 tv that displays 4:3 images really well and w/s images not that well but passable, and then you buy a w/s tv that shows 4:3 images poorly and w/s images not that well either. And all for £1000 plus.
     
  14. pointon

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    16:9 is the best compromise period. Not a compromise between the widescreen picture to fit on the screen and the cost of such a screen. It's a black bar compromise.

    So many people seem to be so bothered by black bars top and bottom on a 2.35:1 picture, but don't even seem to notice the black bars left and right on 4:3 pictures. Imagine such bars if TV's were designed to accomodate the 2.35:1 ratio, and imagine how much you'd complain then! Until a TV arrives which can morph between all screen ratios, then the 16:9 is the one that leaves on average the less amount of disused space both top and bottom and left and right in black barring.

    You'd never be able to afford a 2.35:1 tube, never be able to carry it and never be able to have it in your living room without knocking through a wall first to accomodate the tube.
     
  15. Kevo

    Kevo
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    Let's also not forget that we are talking about two completely different mediums (media?), TELEVISION and CINEMA.

    There's no reason why TV HAS to adopt the 2:35:1 format just beacuse it's the most poular cinema format.
     

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