what is the best artificial lighting design to avoid plasma glare?

Discussion in 'Home Cinema Building DIY' started by intv, Jan 11, 2008.

  1. intv

    intv
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    what is the best artificial lighting design to avoid plasma glare? im not talking about daylight here or watching tv in dimly lit rooms.
    ive searched the forums and even googled the net but the answers ive found seem to be quite vague. discussions often get dragged into an lcd vs plasma debate which lets face it have been done to death.

    so without mentioning lcds or moving plasmas, sunshine or dimly lit rooms, how would you layout your artificial lights

    im guessing you would not want a light shining directly at the screen.
    also guessing, if you replaced the plasma screen with an imaginary mirror you would not want to be able to see a light in this mirror from each viewing position, hence people tilting their plasma down a few degrees. this would make my imaginary mirror show a reflection of the area under a problem light. what if you can see a well lit area in this mirror, light from a reading or task light?
    how can you add a reading light, should a spotlight be used ? 12v or 220v, recessed or eyeball ?
    have you one light you live with but turn off for serious viewing.
    i think as trial and error wass probably the solution for most, gathering the results in a discussion might help some people. my own point of interest is im thinking of adding one downlighter in the ceiling to illuminate a seat which is used for reading and i am hoping it wont be a wasted install.
     
  2. stevelup

    stevelup
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    I had mine tilted down at the previous house because there was a window pointing directly at it.

    In the new house, that isn't a problem so I mounted it straight.

    I've got a square of downlighters running around the room and get no glare at all on the plasma.

    Have a look at my thread here.

    Steve
     
  3. MarkP80

    MarkP80
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    - intv, that's exactly the type of problem I've experienced in my lounge. We have a floor-standing lamp which we've tried in a number of positions, but there's always a seating position that sees the reflection. Like you say, the mirror idea is the way to see if you'll be affected when doing your layout. My tv isn't tilted.

    I actually use this lamp for reading, it's placed at the end of a sofa. The lights are small halogens, and it has a dimmer built-in, which is really useful. Turned off for films.

    MarkP
     
  4. MitsiTurbo

    MitsiTurbo
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    Are you talking about ambient lighting in this case?

    If so, the best solution would have to be a floating wall behind the plasma I would say. Something like Groove's design:

    [​IMG]

    As the lighting is behind the plasma then you get no reflections at all.

    Apologies if this is not what youre after.
     
  5. intv

    intv
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    @MitsiTurbo no, not ambient lighting, more along the lines of task lighting (eg reading lamp). ive seen grooves thread and the design is truly beautiful, (even his photos are professional looking).

    @MarkP80
    when you have the lamp on, do you see a reflection of the bulb, the lamp shade or do you also see the area that the lamp has illuminated. can you see any of the person who is reading.

    @stevelup
    i went thru your thread, amazing work,:thumbsup:
    your just using standard flush-fitting (not-recessed) 12v halogen downlighters , yes?
    could any of the actual fittings be seen from any of your viewing position, if the screen was a mirror, or is my mirror theory to stringent?
     
  6. stevelup

    stevelup
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    I used the satin chrome downlighters from here.

    I think if you make the assumption that your plasma is a mirror, you are adopting a very much worse case scenario.

    The front glass on plasma displays is coated with an anti reflective coating (same as you can get on a pair of glasses). The reflection from even a bright light appears as a blueish purple colour rather than a direct reflection.

    In my room and with the plasma off, you are aware of the presence of the downlighters but they are not invasive. Remember that they are shining straight down and not at the display. The ones I recommended above have the lamp recessed by about 10mm from the face of the fitting as well.

    With the plasma on, they cannot be seen at all.

    Steve
     
  7. intv

    intv
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    great info stevelup thanks for sharing.
    what i was trying to get across with the mirror theory thing was more to do with the angle of reflection than the intensity of the reflection itself. i didnt really explain myself properly. its very interesting to now know that the recessed lights you linked to wont show up reflection when the plasma (with anti-reflection coating) is on, even if the fittings would be viewable thru a mirrored-screen. knowing this, im going to add a few to the ceiling. what watt bulbs did you use?
     
  8. stevelup

    stevelup
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    Hi

    I understand where you are coming from with the reflections, I was just suggesting that a pure mirror is a bit extreme as a comparison point.

    You *can* see the lamps but they are a dull purple glow and not at all invasive for normal viewing.

    I used these 35W lamps.

    Steve
     
  9. MarkP80

    MarkP80
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    Hi,

    The light I read by is only visible on the screen if (as you suggest) the angle of reflection is just right. You can see the light, but obviously your eyes aren't focussed on it. However, if it distracts, then your eyes focus on it, and you can see a perfect reflection of the light (shade).

    If we're all watching, then it's turned off....

    MarkP
     

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