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What is Filmmaker Mode?

Steve Withers

Reviewer
Theoretically it could be, but it doesn't look like any manufacturers are planning to add it to older TVs. I wouldn't worry, there's no Filmmaker Mode or Dolby Vision IQ on my C9 and I certainly won't miss either feature.
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
Can this mode be aded on older tv series....2019...2018?...
In theory, it is just a set of picture adjustments which should be easy enough to add. However, Panasonic has said that if they were to do that it would take away the THX picture modes in last years model due to how these things work and memory available. So, while it might be possible, I don't know of any manufacturer planning on adding this to older sets.
However, just put your TV in the Cinema/THX/Movie/True Cinema picture modes that are the closest to the standards, then switch off the frame interpolation, noise reduction and sharpening features and you have Filmmaker Mode.
The main idea is to give users across all TV brands a recognisable picture setting that is named the same and switches everything off with one button press.
 

MEGATAMA

Active Member
Theoretically it could be, but it doesn't look like any manufacturers are planning to add it to older TVs. I wouldn't worry, there's no Filmmaker Mode or Dolby Vision IQ on my C9 and I certainly won't miss either feature.
I would like to have it on q90r because i miss ISF from my ex B7....
 

MEGATAMA

Active Member
In theory, it is just a set of picture adjustments which should be easy enough to add. However, Panasonic has said that if they were to do that it would take away the THX picture modes in last years model due to how these things work and memory available. So, while it might be possible, I don't know of any manufacturer planning on adding this to older sets.
However, just put your TV in the cinema/THX/movie/True Cinema picture modes that are the closest to the standards, then switch off the frame interpolation, noise reduction and sharpening features and you have Filmmaker Mode.
The main idea is to give users across all TV brands a recognisable picture setting that is named the same and switches everything off with one button press.
Tnx,i already removed from movie mode all that extra processing wich i can remove.
Was thinking is something more in question......
 

berkeley384

Well-known Member
I just don’t see the general public caring about this or using it

Joe bloggs will carry on as they do today blissfully unaware of how a picture should look.

The TV will still arrive set to eco with a picture from hell and most people will just ignore 90% of the settings.

Stuff like this is for the enthusiastic weirdos (like me) who care about watching a film how it should be and the truth is that most people don’t care !

You only need to look at how many people are still buying DVD over Blu Ray and how many people don’t see the point in upgrading to a 4K player

or how many people think they are watching 4K on their new TV when it’s just 720p upscaled etc .

it’s more techy now than Joe blogs gives a crap about. My wife for example only tells me she doesn’t care if we watch Netflix on Sky or ATV4k ,the upgrade from 1080p to 4K Dolby vision goes right over her head so why would she care if it’s in film maker mode

And where is the incentive for the TV company to put money into this? It’s not going to be a selling point if essentially the mode looks the same across vendors? So why plumb a load of cash into it

Great idea - Won’t work ... IMO
 

NicolasB

Distinguished Member
In the case of standard dynamic range (SDR) content that means a white point which corresponds to D65, a colour gamut that matches Rec.2020 and a peak brightness of 100nits.
You mean rec.709, not rec.2020.

In order to retain that film-like motion a movie must be displayed at 24 or 48 frames a second. In the case of the latter, each frame is repeated to reduce judder, and this is actually how films are protected at the cinema.
1) Each film frame being shown twice is intended to reduce flicker, not judder. Reducing judder would require interpolated frames. 2) Most TVs use a sample-and-hold approach which means that displaying a film at 48Hz with simple frame doubling is physically identical to showing it at 24. 3) This approach is only used in cinemas where the projectors still actually run 35mm film through them; hardly any cinemas still use physical film any more. The movies are digital downloads and the projectors are DLP or some other form of pixel-based digital display. 4) You mean "projected" not "protected".

I'm really not sure what you're trying to say, there.
 

NicolasB

Distinguished Member
As for the merits of "film-maker mode", it's a step in the right direction, but only a small one. To be useful, the TV needs to default to film-maker mode out of the box; and I suspect it won't.
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
You mean rec.709, not rec.2020.



1) Each film frame being shown twice is intended to reduce flicker, not judder. Reducing judder would require interpolated frames. 2) Most TVs use a sample-and-hold approach which means that displaying a film at 48Hz with simple frame doubling is physically identical to showing it at 24. 3) This approach is only used in cinemas where the projectors still actually run 35mm film through them; hardly any cinemas still use physical film any more. The movies are digital downloads and the projectors are DLP or some other form of pixel-based digital display. 4) You mean "projected" not "protected".

I'm really not sure what you're trying to say, there.
I should have used you to proof the copy!
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
You mean rec.709, not rec.2020.



1) Each film frame being shown twice is intended to reduce flicker, not judder. Reducing judder would require interpolated frames. 2) Most TVs use a sample-and-hold approach which means that displaying a film at 48Hz with simple frame doubling is physically identical to showing it at 24. 3) This approach is only used in cinemas where the projectors still actually run 35mm film through them; hardly any cinemas still use physical film any more. The movies are digital downloads and the projectors are DLP or some other form of pixel-based digital display. 4) You mean "projected" not "protected".

I'm really not sure what you're trying to say, there.
All I was trying to point out is that there's a difference between repeating the same frame which shouldn't change the perceived motion and adding interpolated frames which smooth out the motion causing it to look less like film and more like video. Seems pretty obvious to me.
 

James Thomas 75

Well-known Member
I just don’t see the general public caring about this or using it

Joe bloggs will carry on as they do today blissfully unaware of how a picture should look.

The TV will still arrive set to eco with a picture from hell and most people will just ignore 90% of the settings.

Stuff like this is for the enthusiastic weirdos (like me) who care about watching a film how it should be and the truth is that most people don’t care !

You only need to look at how many people are still buying DVD over Blu Ray and how many people don’t see the point in upgrading to a 4K player

or how many people think they are watching 4K on their new TV when it’s just 720p upscaled etc .

it’s more techy now than Joe blogs gives a crap about. My wife for example only tells me she doesn’t care if we watch Netflix on Sky or ATV4k ,the upgrade from 1080p to 4K Dolby vision goes right over her head so why would she care if it’s in film maker mode

And where is the incentive for the TV company to put money into this? It’s not going to be a selling point if essentially the mode looks the same across vendors? So why plumb a load of cash into it

Great idea - Won’t work ... IMO
Me neither. I just don’t see the general public using it.

One of my work colleagues bought my previous JS9000 TV off of me when I recently purchased a Q90 a few months back.

When he bought his current UHD player around 18 months ago. The first thing I noticed during playback on his old Samsung TV was that the motion settings were clearly ramped up severely.
It looked awful.

All of the motion settings on my TV’s are completely deactivated. And the first thing I was expecting to hear from him, was something along the lines of “why isn’t the picture on this as smooth as my old one?”

Few months on. He’s none the wiser :D
 

raduv1

Distinguished Member
Will not be used by Joe public or the AV enthusiast who know better . Waste of time , money and energy their end . A mode built for .....?
 

lgans316

Distinguished Member
Can't wait for non-OLED high nit loving crowd to say Why does this mode look so dull when they switch to this mode lol
 

raduv1

Distinguished Member
Can't wait for non-OLED high nit loving crowd to say Why does this mode look so dull when they switch to this mode lol
They won't. I have friends and family owners of OLED and LCD LED high end displays that only want the most vivid of modes.its a waste of effort on the manufacturers part . I once had a member on here tell me ( on this forum ! ) that having a pro calibration on your display was to be de tuning it ! This was on the Pana DX902 thread , one of the finest FALD displays made . I'm LG OLED now and do not see the point of this mode .
 

Prizm

Novice Member
Oh, not more “this is how the filmmaker intended” fanboy BS. Ever notice that the filmmakers themselves almost never initiate these obsessions about how their films *should* look?

Every time a film get re-released it gets regraded, recolored, remastered, whatever. The colors look wrong on one release, but appear more balanced in the next. Which one is the director’s true vision? Did the director intend for waxy-faced digital noise reduction and pink lightsabers? I’ll bet you the director doesn’t check every one of these re-releases, and if anything it’s just a rubber stamp approval after watching 5 minutes of the latest remaster.

Watch the film how you think it looks best. And stop wasting time obsessing over whether the director ‘intended’ for the blue setting to be 48 or 49.
 

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