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What is edge tizzing, dot crawl, bleed, frequency response?

Discussion in 'Televisions' started by simon3d, Dec 17, 2002.

  1. simon3d

    simon3d
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    Hi

    Having just got a few mags with reviews of TVs, I've come accross terminology that has not been explained in any glossary within the mag. I've done searches on this site, and accross the net for edge tizzing, but can't find any meaning for it.

    So could someone please enlighten me on these commonly used terms by reviewers.

    Edge tizzing?

    dot crawl?

    bleeding - poor alignment of mask, adjacent pixels therefore influence each other, i.e. bleed into one another, which could be a problem for edges of an object???

    frequency response - is that for the tv or sound. I presume sound, but not sure. Typical example "clear to 5.8MHz".

    So what things should I be looking for to indicate its a good picture/ quality TV.

    Looking to get a 28"/32" widescreen, upgrading from 14" 4:3, with 2 RGB scarts & pal playback. Probably just nicam sound, as I'll get amp and speaker system to play 5.1/6.1 DS from dvd player (dxr3 - creative labs) at the moment. I'll get a standalone in future.

    Thanks in advance.

    Simon
     
  2. Squirrel God

    Squirrel God
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    Edge tizzing - Edges are fuzzy (might shake a little), image lacks sharp definition.

    Dot crawl - Aliasing in pixels causes pattern movement that looks like patterns of coloured pixels moving, i.e. dots crawling.

    Bleeding - No clear definition of edges between adjacent colours, hence they tend to overlap and "bleed" into each other.

    Frequency response - In the case of TV reviews, it's usually for images, not sound (although you could have similar freq. response measures for sound too!). The greater detail in an image, the higher the frequency tends to be. 4.8MHz is usually the problem boundary. Most TVs get up to this with no problem, after this, some TVs do better than others. If a TV can display all the way up to 5.8 MHz without any noise, then it should be nice and clear and be able to display great detail. Perfect for watching high-res sources like DVDs. As a rough example, to see the effect that higher frequency response has on an image, compare a VHS still with a DVD still from the same movie (best to pick a video frame that has great detail, e.g. a video frame from Cast Away that shows the beach and the leaves on the trees). VHS will not show up all the little bits of detail in the sand and the edges and fine detail in the leaves. DVD via RGB will.

    You might find this website useful for future reference:
    http://www.audiovideo101.com/dictionary/

    Hope that helps :)
     
  3. simon3d

    simon3d
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    Thanks for enlightening me Squirrel + for the useful URL.

    Simon
     

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