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What is Dolby Vision IQ?

Built To Chill

Well-known Member
Hi - any indication if this might come to pre-existing TVs that have Dolby Vision and ambient light sensors? Or whether it requires some sort or custom/calibrated sensor.

Thank in anycase for the write up.
 

popelife

Active Member
I get the impression it's more geared towards compensating for brightly-lit viewing rooms than getting picture levels right for blacked-out rooms.

Personally, I've never managed to get a direct-view TV (e.g. OLED) to look right in a completely blacked out room. The screen is just too bright and too small - even at 65" - which gradually causes eye-strain. Maybe I just haven't been daring enough to turn the picture brightness down as low as it needs to go - I would need more user-presets to do that (please LG). But I've always found a little bit of background lighting helps with viewing comfort. The trick is getting the lighting sufficiently dim and even, and not too yellow (and making sure that light sources aren't visible in the screen). I think the Philips Hue bulbs with adjustable colour temp are really good for this - although getting them dim enough can be a problem. I've had to be a bit creative with that.

Ultimately though, I'd like a projector and much bigger screen, which would make blackout conditions work without causing eyestrain.
 

v1c

Active Member
I'd be more interested to know how DV IQ compares to/works with professional ISF calibration. I.E would the purchase of a DV IQ TV negate the need for Professional Calibration as it's working to Director intended PQ , or would a professional calibration still be worth doing ?
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
Hi - any indication if this might come to pre-existing TVs that have Dolby Vision and ambient light sensors? Or whether it requires some sort or custom/calibrated sensor.

Thank in anycase for the write up.
From what I've been told DV IQ will only be added to 2020 TVs, although whether that's because of hardware limitations in 2019 TVs and earlier or a business decision I can't say.
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
I'd be more interested to know how DV IQ compares to/works with professional ISF calibration. I.E would the purchase of a DV IQ TV negate the need for Professional Calibration as it's working to Director intended PQ , or would a professional calibration still be worth doing ?
DV IQ just adjusts the image based on dynamic metadata and the amount of ambient light in the room. However a calibration will ensure the SDR, HDR10 and Dolby Vision modes are all accurate.
 

Built To Chill

Well-known Member
From what I've been told DV IQ will only be added to 2020 TVs, although whether that's because of hardware limitations in 2019 TVs and earlier or a business decision I can't say.
Thanks, appreciated.

Wouldn’t surprise me if it never comes to older sets even if it is possible. But it’s good to hear - if I correctly infer - that they haven’t been talking about a “special” ambient light sensor, which would categorically rule that out forever.
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
Thanks, appreciated.

Wouldn’t surprise me if it never comes to older sets even if it is possible. But it’s good to hear - if I correctly infer - that they haven’t been talking about a “special” ambient light sensor, which would categorically rule that out forever.
To be honest you don't need DV IQ, all Dolby Vision TVs have Cinema and Cinema Home settings, so just use the former in a darkened room and the latter when there's a lot of ambient light.
 

Phil Hinton

Editor
Staff member
To be honest you don't need DV IQ, all Dolby Vision TVs have Cinema and Cinema Home settings, so just use the former in a darkened room and the latter when there's a lot of ambient light.
Just be aware that some manufacturers, like Philips, add their own processing and motion smoothing to Dolby Vision Bright modes, so you will need to switch those off. Dolby allows image manipulation to the bright modes, but DV dark will always be as intended with no processing.
 

Toon Army

Well-known Member
Thanks Steve and look forward to you and Phil testing DV IQ in a home environment, opening and closing your curtains/blinds.

Whilst I appreciate the light levels are measured by the TV where it's located, could they not differ from the primary viewing position in a lit room? Our TV is against a south facing wall with 4 windows. The viewing position is on the opposite side of the room and thus more brightly lit during the day. Would the viewer be able to compensate for the difference whilst in this setting?
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
Whilst I appreciate the light levels are measured by the TV where it's located, could they not differ from the primary viewing position in a lit room? Our TV is against a south facing wall with 4 windows. The viewing position is on the opposite side of the room and thus more brightly lit during the day. Would the viewer be able to compensate for the difference whilst in this setting?
That's a good question. At the Panasonic demo they had to put a smartphone light under the sensor to actually get it to work because of the size of the room, which suggests it's very dependent on the ambient light falling directly on the TV. Unfortunately there's very little the viewer can do to compensate because ordinarily you'd increase the backlight/OLED light, but with HDR those settings are already maxed out. That only leaves manipulating the PQ curve, which isn't ideal and might not even be possible (depending on the mode and the manufacturer).
 

Built To Chill

Well-known Member
why sad fellow?
I didn’t do the sad face but personally I find it exhausting watching HDR on OLED in a pitch black room. I have a Phillips hue strip behind mine to provide some ambient light.

Each to their own though of course - I know it does look more stunning in the pitch black. I just find myself wanting to go to bed after about half an hour... :laugh:
 

Paul7777x

Distinguished Member
Aha...

I don’t have an HDR tv.

I have a rather old Panasonic 58AX802.

Never too bright, in fact just on a few occasions, I would prefer a little extra brightness.

As for watching in the dark, it’s essential For me. Much less atmosphere otherwise.
 

Steve Withers

Reviewer
Would this help with blooming on the soon to be released nanocells?
No, that's just a fundamental limitation of the technology. The local dimming on LG's NanoCell LCD TVs has been poor for years and given the company has spent the last decade investing in OLED, do you really think it's particularly bothered about LCD?
 

dan~

Standard Member
No, that's just a fundamental limitation of the technology. The local dimming on LG's NanoCell LCD TVs has been poor for years and given the company has spent the last decade investing in OLED, do you really think it's particularly bothered about LCD?
Good point, I’m still using a Samsung UE55B7020WW from 2009 and doesn’t have issues with blooming at all (unless i’ve got use to it)

I’m a bit worried about screen burn from OLEDS, so I was hoping this years nanocells would be better than last years
 

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